Harness Inspection

Harness
Harness Information

Is Label Attached to Harness?

Is Label Fully Legible?

Take photo of label or enter information below.
Harness Date of Manufacture

Manufacturer of Harness

Serial Number of Harness

Model # of Harness

Webbing
Inspect the entire surface of webbing for damage. Beginning at one end, bend the webbing in an inverted “U.” Holding the body side of the belt toward you, grasp the belt with your hands six to eight inches Apart. This surface tension makes the damaged fibers or cuts easier to see. Watch for frayed edges, broken fibers, pulled stitches, cuts, burns and chemical damage.

Free of Cuts?

Free of Frays?

Free of Broken Fibers?

Free of Broken Stitches?

Free of Tears?

Free of Abrasions?

Free of Punctures?

Free of Burns?

Hardware Condition:
“D” Rings/Back Pads: Check “D” rings for distortion, cracks, breaks and rough or sharp edges. The “D” ring should pivot freely. “D” ring back pads should also be inspected for damage.
Attachment of Buckles: Note any unusual wear, frayed or cut fiber, or distortion of the buckles.
Tongue/Grommet: The tongue receives heavy wear from repeated buckling and unbuckling. Inspect for loose, distorted or broken grommets. The webbing should not have any additional punched holes.
Tongue Buckle: Buckle tongues should be free of distortion in shape and motion. They should overlap the buckle frame and move freely back and forth in their socket. The roller should turn freely on the frame. Check for Distortion or sharp edges.
Friction and Mating Buckles: Inspect the buckle for distortion. The outer bars and center bars must be straight. Pay special attention to Corners and attachment points of the center bar.

Free of Damaged or Worn Parts?

Free of Broken or Bent Parts?

Free of Any Sharp Edges?

Free of Burrs?

Free of Cracks?

Parts Free of Distortion and Elongation?

Free of Corrosion?

Free of Loose, Distorted or Missing Grommets?

Do Buckles Function Correctly?

Hardware

Buckles in Place?

D-Rings in Place?

Back Pad in Place?

Loop Keepers in Place?

Comments / Further Action Required:

Does the harness meet requirements for use by Ecoserv personnel?

Date Equipment Destroyed:
Proof of Destruction

Comments:

Lanyard Inspection

Lanyards
Lanyard Information

Is Label Attached to Lanyard?

Is Label Fully Legible?

Take photo of label or enter information below
Lanyard Date of Manufacture

Manufacturer of Lanyard

Serial Number of Lanyard

Model # of Lanyard

Shock Pack
Absorbing lanyards should be examined as a web lanyard. However, also look for signs of Deployment. If the lanyard shows signs of having been put under load (e.g., torn out stitching), remove it from service and destroy.

Any signs of being placed under load?

Torn Stitching?

Webbing
Inspect the entire surface of webbing for damage. Beginning at one end, bend the webbing in an inverted.” Holding the body side of the belt toward you, grasp the belt with your hands six to eight inches apart. This surface tension makes the damaged fibers or cuts easier to see. Watch for frayed edges, broken fibers, pulled stitches, cuts, burns and chemical damage.

Free of Cuts?

Free of Frays?

Free of Broken Fibers?

Free of Broken Stitches?

Free of Tears?

Free of Abrasions?

Free of Punctures?

Free of Burns?

Hardware Condition
“D” Rings/Back Pads: Check “D” rings for distortion, cracks, breaks and rough or sharp edges. The “D” ring should pivot freely. “D” ring back pads should also be inspected for damage.
Hook and Hook Gate: Both the hook and the hook gate receive heavy wear from repeated anchorage connecting and latching. Inspect for loose, distorted or signs of wear that are damaging to the overall use of the equipment. The connecting webbing should not have any damaged fibers or cuts. Watch for frayed edges, broken fibers, pulled stitches, cuts, burns and chemical damage.

Free of Damaged or Worn Parts?

Free of Broken or Bent Parts?

Free of Any Sharp Edges?

Free of Burrs?

Free of Cracks?

Free of Distortion and Elongation?

Free of Corrosion?

Hook and Hook Gate are Functional?

Comments / Further Action Required:

Does the lanyard meet requirements for use by Ecoserv personnel?

Date Equipment Destroyed:
Proof of Destruction

Comments:

Self Retracting Lifeline (SRL) Inspection

Self Retracting Lifeline (SRL)
Self Retracting Lifeline Information

Condition of SRL

Company performing last service / calibration of SRL

SRL Date of Last Service / Calibration
Take photo of labels or enter information below
SRL Date of Manufacture

Manufacturer of SRL

Serial Number of SRL

Model Number of SRL

Housing / Cover

Casing Bolts Tight / Snug

Loose Fasteners

Missing Parts

Cracks or Wear

No Deformation at Connecting Areas

Corrosion

Overall Deterioration

Modification by User

Physical Damage

Bent, Cracked, Distorted, Worn or Malfunctioning Parts

Snap Hooks

Distortion (twist/bends)

Rust or Corrosion

Modification by Users

Rough or Sharp Edges

Latch / Keeper Seated in Nose Properly Without Binding

Latch / Keeper is not Distorted or Obstructed

Overall Deterioration / Excessive Wear

Any Cracks

Any Missing Parts

Locking Mechanism is Working Properly

Snap Hook Keeper Mechanism is Working Properly

Wire Rope / Lanyard Retraction & Tension Test
Do not pull lifeline out of the housing or let it retract while the unit is lying flat. Always inspect and operate the unit in a mounted position. The purpose of the lanyard retraction & tension test is to ensure the lifeline is retracting smoothly into and out of the housing.

Cuts / Frayed Areas

Worn or Broken Strands / Wires

Overall Deterioration / Excessive Outside Wear

Modifications by the User

Corrosion / Pitting

Crushed / Jammed or Flattened Strands

Bulges in the Rope

Gaps Between Strands

Heat Damage / Torch Burns / Electrical Arc Strikes

Kinks / Bird Caging

Core Protrusion

SRL Retraction & Tension Test
The purpose of the lanyard retraction & tension test is to ensure the lifeline is retracting smoothly into and out of the housing.
Steps:
1.) Mount retractable on anchorage point
2.) Pull out 50% of the lifeline length
3.) Maintain a light tension on the lifeline (approx. 1 lb. (0.45kg)
4.) Allow lifeline to retract back into housing.
5.) Repeat Steps 2 to 4 this time pulling out 100% of lifeline length
Do not allow lifeline to retract into housing uncontrolled – this could result in injury and damage to the unit.
Note: If lifeline does not pull out smoothly or sticks when retracting, pull the entire lifeline out of the housing and allow it to retract slowly under tension. Then repeat the above test.
Result – The lifeline should pull out freely and retract all the way back into the unit. Remove from service if device does not pass this test.

Does SRL Pass the Requirements of the Retraction & Tension Test?

Date SRL is removed from service?
Braking Test
The purpose of the braking test is to ensure that the retractable braking mechanism is working and engaging.
Steps:
1.) Mount retractable on anchorage point
2.) Grasp lifeline and apply a sharp steady pull downward until brakes engage
3.) Keep tension on lifeline until brakes are fully engaged
4.) Release tension
5.) Allow lifeline to retract into housing under light tension
Result – Brakes should engage. There should be no slippage of the lifeline while the brakes are engaged. Once tensions released, the brakes should disengage and the unit should return to retractable mode. Remove from service if device does not pass this test.

Does SRL Pass the Requirements of the Braking Test?

Date SRL is removed from service?

Comments / Further Action Required:

Does the SRL meet requirements for use by Ecoserv personnel?

Date SRL is removed from service:
Date SRL is sent for repair / servicing:

Comments:

Inspection Completion / Signatures

If inspections reveal any defective condition / deficiencies, remove items from service and destroy or send for servicing as required.
Person-In-Charge Signature:

Person-In Charge Comments:

Inspector's Signature:

Inspector's Comments:

Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.