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Fumigation of Bulk and Bagged Cargo in Ship’s Holds with Phosphine

Before Fumigant Application

All the cargo spaces to be fumigated are suitable for fumigation.

The master or his trained representatives have been made familiar with the fumigant label, detection methods, safety procedures and emergency procedures.

The fumigator in charge verified that gas detection and respiratory protection equipment (as required by IMDG and IMO recommendations) carried on the ship are all in good working order and are suitable and appropriate for the task, and that adequate fresh supplies of consumable items for this equipment are available to allow proper measurement.

In the event that sufficient quantities of effective safety equipment are not on board, the fumigator-in-charge should remind the master in writing of his responsibility to carry this and should assist the master wherever possible by either supplying the equipment or making arrangements for it to be supplied so that the ship fulfills its responsibility to carry sufficient items.

The vessel carries the necessary medicines and medical equipment, and the latest version of the Medical First Aid Guide for Use in Accident lnvolving Dangerous Goods (MFAG).

The fumigator-in-charge should remind the master in writing of his responsibility to carry this and assist him wherever possible to obtain these items so that the ship fulfills its responsibility to carry these items.

The master has been notified in writing of the spaces containing cargo to be fumigated.

The master has been notified in writing of any other spaces that are considered unsafe, or could become unsafe to enter during the fumigation.

Fumigant Application

The fumigator applied the appropriate efficacy criteria in relation to the required minimum effective dosage, method of treatment and exposure time.

After Fumigant Application

Each hold has been checked for leakage and secured properly.

The spaces adjacent to (or with a possible connection to) the treated cargo spaces have been checked and found to be gas-free.

The master or his trained representatives have been made aware of the specific areas to be checked for gas concentrations throughout the fumigation period.

Responsible crew members have been shown how to take gas readings correctly when gas is present, and they are fully conversant with the use of gas-detection equipment provided.

The master or trained representatives have been made aware that even though the initial check may not indicate any leaks.

It is essential that monitoring is to be continued in the accommodation, engine–room, etc. because concentrations may reach their highest levels after several days.

The master or trained representatives have been made aware of the possibility of gas diffusing throughout the duct keel and/or ballast tanks and/or fire warning system.

The master or trained representatives have been made aware that the master is responsible for all aspects of the safety of the fumigation once the fumigator-in-charge has formally handed over responsibility to him, and left the vessel.

Monitoring

Make sure gas is not leaking from the enclosure.

Confirm that nearby crew members and bystanders are not exposed to levels above the allowed limits.

During aeration, corrective action must be taken if gas levels exceed the allowed levels in an area where crew members and bystanders may be exposed.

Make sure the gas detector tubes and associated pumps do not leak.

Always purge every sampling line before taking a sample of gas.

Make sure the sampling line is not blocked or broken.

Always use the correct number of pump strokes for the tube you are using.

Take phosphine readings to ensure proper gas concentrations.

If the phosphine concentrations have fallen below the targeted level, the fumigators may reenter the vessel, following proper entry procedures.

Find out if the treatment has been a success or a failure at the end of the exposure period.

Sign Off

Additional Comments

Officer in Charge Name & Signature

Fumigation Checklist Template

Created by: SafetyCulture Staff | Industry: General | Downloads: 2

A fumigation checklist is used by the vessel’s captain, officer-in-charge, or trained crew members to follow proper fumigation procedure before, during, and after fumigant application. This 22-item fumigation checklist includes critical inspection points for monitoring such as exposure limits, gas detector tubes, and gas concentrations. Accurately capture temperature or humidity using iAuditor temperature sensors and easily manage risks through proactive alerts to the right people when something goes wrong.

Signup for a free iAuditor account to download and edit this checklist. It will be added to your free account and you will be able to conduct inspections from your mobile device.

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Fumigation of Bulk and Bagged Cargo in Ship’s Holds with Phosphine

Before Fumigant Application

All the cargo spaces to be fumigated are suitable for fumigation.

The master or his trained representatives have been made familiar with the fumigant label, detection methods, safety procedures and emergency procedures.

The fumigator in charge verified that gas detection and respiratory protection equipment (as required by IMDG and IMO recommendations) carried on the ship are all in good working order and are suitable and appropriate for the task, and that adequate fresh supplies of consumable items for this equipment are available to allow proper measurement.

In the event that sufficient quantities of effective safety equipment are not on board, the fumigator-in-charge should remind the master in writing of his responsibility to carry this and should assist the master wherever possible by either supplying the equipment or making arrangements for it to be supplied so that the ship fulfills its responsibility to carry sufficient items.

The vessel carries the necessary medicines and medical equipment, and the latest version of the Medical First Aid Guide for Use in Accident lnvolving Dangerous Goods (MFAG).

The fumigator-in-charge should remind the master in writing of his responsibility to carry this and assist him wherever possible to obtain these items so that the ship fulfills its responsibility to carry these items.

The master has been notified in writing of the spaces containing cargo to be fumigated.

The master has been notified in writing of any other spaces that are considered unsafe, or could become unsafe to enter during the fumigation.

Fumigant Application

The fumigator applied the appropriate efficacy criteria in relation to the required minimum effective dosage, method of treatment and exposure time.

After Fumigant Application

Each hold has been checked for leakage and secured properly.

The spaces adjacent to (or with a possible connection to) the treated cargo spaces have been checked and found to be gas-free.

The master or his trained representatives have been made aware of the specific areas to be checked for gas concentrations throughout the fumigation period.

Responsible crew members have been shown how to take gas readings correctly when gas is present, and they are fully conversant with the use of gas-detection equipment provided.

The master or trained representatives have been made aware that even though the initial check may not indicate any leaks.

It is essential that monitoring is to be continued in the accommodation, engine–room, etc. because concentrations may reach their highest levels after several days.

The master or trained representatives have been made aware of the possibility of gas diffusing throughout the duct keel and/or ballast tanks and/or fire warning system.

The master or trained representatives have been made aware that the master is responsible for all aspects of the safety of the fumigation once the fumigator-in-charge has formally handed over responsibility to him, and left the vessel.

Monitoring

Make sure gas is not leaking from the enclosure.

Confirm that nearby crew members and bystanders are not exposed to levels above the allowed limits.

During aeration, corrective action must be taken if gas levels exceed the allowed levels in an area where crew members and bystanders may be exposed.

Make sure the gas detector tubes and associated pumps do not leak.

Always purge every sampling line before taking a sample of gas.

Make sure the sampling line is not blocked or broken.

Always use the correct number of pump strokes for the tube you are using.

Take phosphine readings to ensure proper gas concentrations.

If the phosphine concentrations have fallen below the targeted level, the fumigators may reenter the vessel, following proper entry procedures.

Find out if the treatment has been a success or a failure at the end of the exposure period.

Sign Off

Additional Comments

Officer in Charge Name & Signature