Audit

WEEKLY ACCIDENT REVIEW

Another successful week for safety! The week of July 8, 2013 we reported no new injuries that required medical treatment. We did, however, have a minor first aid injury in Northern California.

A sheet metal apprentice working at the project in Pacifico, California suffered a bruise to his face. The apprentice was using a retractable lanyard on a loading dock. When he was removing the fall restraint system the yo-yo swung and struck him on the side of his head. The injury was caused by inattention and poor positioning of the retractable lanyard. Please be sure to anchor all lanyards above you.

WEEKLY TOPIC

SEVEN COMMON SAFETY ACCIDENTS

Consider this statistic: 80 of of every 100 accidents are the fault of the person involved in the incident. Unsafe acts cause four times as many accidents and injuries as unsafe conditions.

Accidents occur for many reasons. In most industries people ten to look for "things" to blame when an accident happens, because it's easier to look for "root causes", such as those listed below. Consider the underlying accident causes described. Have you been guilty of any of these attitudes or behaviors? If so, you may not have been injured...but next time you might not be so lucky.

1. TAKING SHORTCUTS

Every day we make decisions we hope will make the job faster and more efficient. But do time savers ever risk your own safety, or that of crew members? Short cuts that reduce safety on the job are not short cuts but an increased chance for injury.

2. BEING OVER-CONFIDENT

Confidence is a good thing. Overconfidence is too much of a good thing. "It'll never happen to me" is an attitude that can lead to improper procedures, tools, or methods in your work. Any of these can lead to an injury.

3. STARTING A TASK WITH INCOMPLETE INSTRUCTIONS

To do the job safely and right the first time you need complete information. Have you ever seen a worker sent to do a job, having been given only a part of the job's instructions? Don't be shy about asking for explanations about work procedures and safety precautions. It isn't dumb to ask questions...it's dumb NOT to.

4. POOR HOUSEKEEPING

When clients, managers, or safety professionals walk through your work site, housekeeping is an accurate indicator of everyone's attitude about quality, production, and safety. Poor housekeeping creates hazards of all types. A well maintained area sets a standard for other to follow. Good housekeeping involves both pride and safety.

5. IGNORING SAFETY PROCEDURES

Purposely failing to observe safety procedures can endanger you and your co-workers, You are being paid to follow the company safety policies - not to make your own rules. Being "casual" about safety can lead to a casualty!

6. MENTAL DISTRACTIONS FROM WORK

Having a bad day at home and worrying about it at work is a hazardous combination. Dropping your mental guard can pull your focus away from safe work procedures. You can also be distracted when you're busy working and a friend comes by to talk while you are trying to work. Don't become a statistic because you took your eyes off the machine "just for a minute".

7. FAILURE TO PRE-PLAN THE WORK

There is a lot of talk today about Job Hazard Analysis. JHA's are an effective way to figure out the smartest ways to work safely and effectively. Being hasty in starting a task, or not thinking through the process can put you in harms way. Instead, plan your work then WORK THE PLAN!

"it's better to be careful 100 times than to get killed once" - Mark Twain

OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVEMENT

Opportunities for improvement are ALWAYS welcome! Use the Opportunity for Improvement template on iAuditor to submit.

JOBSITE SAFETY CHECKLIST
Select date

Job Name:

Job Number:

Checked By:

Signature:
1. RECORDKEEPING

a. Notices, Posters (5-in1, OSHA Notice, Payroll)

b. Emergency Contacts

c. OSHA 300 Log

2. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

a. In use: Safety glasses, Hard hats, Work boots, Gloves

b. Face shields or goggles used for overhead work

c. Respirators available

d. Welding screens

3. FIRST AID KITS

a. Available in gang box and job site trailer

b. Stocked adequately with gloves, bandages, and antiseptics

c. CPR and First Aid trained personnel

d. Medical facility location and contact information communicated

4. SCAFFOLDS

a. Competent person certified

b. Scaffold grade planking

c. Fall protection

d. Clear of debris / trash

5. LADDERS

a. Free from defects with safety feet, blocked, cleated, or otherwise secured.

b. Straight ladders at 1:4 pitch

6. CYLINDERS

a. Capped, stored in an upright position

b. Oxygen / Acetylene properly separated

c. Empty gas cylinders marked

7. TOOLS / EQUIPMENT

a. Inspected to ensure safe operating condition

b. Hand tools free from defects

c. Unsafe / Unusable tools / equipment tagged "Do Not Use"

d. Tools / Equipment properly guarded

8. HOUSEKEEPING

a. Maintained

b. Aisles and exit ways clear with 24" clearance

c. Work areas uncluttered and debris removed

9. ELECTRICAL

a. Electrical equipment grounded

b. Tools double insulated

c. Cords in good condition

d. Electrical panels covered if energized

10. FALL PROTECTION

a. Guard rails, mid rails, toe boards

b. Fall restraint systems

c. Open sides floors or platforms equipped with standard railing

d. Openings (interior / perimeter) properly barricaded or covered

11. FIRE PREVENTION

a. Flammable and explosive materials stored safely

b. Adequate number of fire extinguishers available with tags and clips

c. Vehicles and mobile equipment provided with extinguishers

12. EXCAVATIONS

a. Over 4 ft shored, benched, or sloped as required

b. Steps or ladders at 25 ft intervals

c. Competent person on site

13. HAZARD COMMUNICATION

a. MSDS and Labels available

b. Employees briefed on HAZCOM

c. HAZCOM information poster posted

d. Employees familiar with MSDS books and their location

COMMENTS

Type comments here or use "Sign" function to write:

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PRE-TASK PLAN

Ensure a Pre-Task Plan is completed on paper or via the iAuditor app.

CREW SIGNATURES
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Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.