Audit

WEEKLY ACCIDENT REVIEW

The week of May 20th we reported one new injury. The injury occurred in the Mid-Atlantic division.

A journeyman detailer was walking in a crouched position to pass underneath a low hanging piece of duct that was suspended over a designated walkway. He passed underneath the duct but did not see a pipe that was hidden by the duct and struck his head. He initially denied medical treatment, but after some continued discomfort was seen by a physician. He was diagnosed with a neck strain and released to work. This is a recordable, no lost time injury. The injury was attributed to in attention, haste, and could have been prevented by identifying low hanging materials with cation tape.

WEEKLY TOPIC

Complacency is defined by Webster's Dictionary as: self-satisfaction when accompanied by unawareness of actual dangers or deficiencies.

Complacency is perhaps one of the biggest problems we face in completing our day to day tasks. We are "used" to things being a certain way each time and unless the obvious comes right out and hits us...we can be oblivious to it all. This state of mind can affect many things such as productivity , quality, and safety.

Here is an example: aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it doesn't matter in waht order the ltteers in a wrod are, the only important thing is that the first and last letter be in the right place. The rest can be a total mess and you can still read it without a problem. This is because the human mind does not read every letter by itself, but the word as a whole.

You probably didn't have much trouble reading that paragraph. It probably took you back at first, but then you were able to zip rig through the text and understand the content. This is an example of how complacency works with our mind. We get used to words starting with certain letters and being a certain length and we skip right over it "thinking" we know what the word is.

In reading paragraphs it's not a big deal....however when it comes to safety, complacency can be a literal "killer" on the job. Each moment we are working with hazardous energy, whether it be a large production machine, forklift, automobile, power tools, electricity, or even walking from one end of the facility to the other, we must keep focused on the task at hand.

There is much danger in going into "autopilot" when working on the job. All too often we don't realize how complacent we are until a near miss or close call. Those events tend to jump our hearts and focus our attention....at least for a little while on the task at hand.

On e technique found to be effective in battling complacency in your own actions is to watch the actions of of others while they work. It's has a dual-fold effect in that it raises your awareness as you examine the actions of a coworker as they are working and it may raise your coworkers awareness if you share with them some of the observations you made that would allow them to do their job in a safer manner. It can be a win-win.

Try this technique today as you are working and feel yourself going into the complacent state of autopilot. You'll find it can truly work well...for everyone.

OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVEMENT

Opportunities for improvement are ALWAYS welcome! Use the Opportunity for Improvement template on iAuditor to submit.

JOBSITE SAFETY CHECKLIST
Select date

Job Name:

Job Number:

Checked By:

Signature:
1. RECORDKEEPING

a. Notices, Posters (5-in1, OSHA Notice, Payroll)

b. Emergency Contacts

c. OSHA 300 Log

2. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

a. In use: Safety glasses, Hard hats, Work boots, Gloves

b. Face shields or goggles used for overhead work

c. Respirators available

d. Welding screens

3. FIRST AID KITS

a. Available in gang box and job site trailer

b. Stocked adequately with gloves, bandages, and antiseptics

c. CPR and First Aid trained personnel

d. Medical facility location and contact information communicated

4. SCAFFOLDS

a. Competent person certified

b. Scaffold grade planking

c. Fall protection

d. Clear of debris / trash

5. LADDERS

a. Free from defects with safety feet, blocked, cleated, or otherwise secured.

b. Straight ladders at 1:4 pitch

6. CYLINDERS

a. Capped, stored in an upright position

b. Oxygen / Acetylene properly separated

c. Empty gas cylinders marked

7. TOOLS / EQUIPMENT

a. Inspected to ensure safe operating condition

b. Hand tools free from defects

c. Unsafe / Unusable tools / equipment tagged "Do Not Use"

d. Tools / Equipment properly guarded

8. HOUSEKEEPING

a. Maintained

b. Aisles and exit ways clear with 24" clearance

c. Work areas uncluttered and debris removed

9. ELECTRICAL

a. Electrical equipment grounded

b. Tools double insulated

c. Cords in good condition

d. Electrical panels covered if energized

10. FALL PROTECTION

a. Guard rails, mid rails, toe boards

b. Fall restraint systems

c. Open sides floors or platforms equipped with standard railing

d. Openings (interior / perimeter) properly barricaded or covered

11. FIRE PREVENTION

a. Flammable and explosive materials stored safely

b. Adequate number of fire extinguishers available with tags and clips

c. Vehicles and mobile equipment provided with extinguishers

12. EXCAVATIONS

a. Over 4 ft shored, benched, or sloped as required

b. Steps or ladders at 25 ft intervals

c. Competent person on site

13. HAZARD COMMUNICATION

a. MSDS and Labels available

b. Employees briefed on HAZCOM

c. HAZCOM information poster posted

d. Employees familiar with MSDS books and their location

COMMENTS

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PRE-TASK PLAN

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Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.