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  • THIS AUDIT QUESTIONAIR IS BASED ON COMMISSION REGULATION (EC) No 2042/2003 of 20 November 2003 With amendment (EC) No 707/2006 of 8 May 2006, (EC) No 376/2007 of 30 March 2007, (EC) No 1056/2008 of 27 October 2008, (EC) No 127/2010 of 5 February 2010, (EC) No 962/2010 of 26 October 2010 (Not affected) and (EU) No 1149/2011 of 21 October 2011

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SECTION A TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS

SUBPART G - CONTINUING AIRWORTHINESS MANAGEMENT ORGANISATION

M.A.701 Scope

  • This Subpart establishes the requirements to be met by an organisation to qualify for the issue or continuation of an approval for the management of aircraft continuing airworthiness

M.A.702 Application

  • An application for issue or change of a continuing airworthiness management organisation approval shall be made on a form and in a manner established by the competent authority.

  • AMC M.A.702 Application <br>An application should be made on an EASA Form 2 (Appendix AMC IX to AMC M.A.602 and AMC M.A.702) or equivalent acceptable to the competent authority. The EASA Form 2 is valid for the application for M.A. Subpart F, Part-145 and M.A. Subpart G organisations. Organisations applying for several approvals may do so using a single EASA Form 2.

M.A.703 Extent of approval

  • (a) The approval is indicated on a certificate included in Appendix VI issued by the competent authority. <br>(Part M subpart G godkendelse + redegørelse for omfanget af godkendt arbejde?)

  • (b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), for commercial air transport, the approval shall be part of the air operator certificate issued by the competent authority, for the aircraft operated. <br>(Udgør Part MG godkendelsen en del af AOC’en?)

  • (c) The scope of work deemed to constitute the approval shall be specified in the continuing airworthiness management exposition in accordance with point M.A.704

M.A.704 Continuing airworthiness management exposition - (CAME Part 5)

  • (a) The continuing airworthiness management organisation shall provide a continuing airworthiness management exposition containing the following information:

  • 1. a statement signed by the accountable manager to confirm that the organisation will work in accordance with this Part and the exposition at all times, and; - (CAME Part 0.1, 0.2) <br>(Statement underskrevet af accountable manager)

  • 2. the organisation's scope of work, and; <br>(Beskrivelse af organisationens arbejdsområde)

  • 3. the title(s) and name(s) of person(s) referred to in points M.A.706(a), M.A.706(c), M.A.706(d) and M.A.706(i); - (CAME Part 0.3) <br>(Titel + navn på Acc. Manager + Part MG ansvarlige personer + review staff)

  • 4. an organisation chart showing associated chains of responsibility between all the person(s) referred to in points M.A.706(a), M.A.706(c), M.A.706(d) and M.A.706(i). - (CAME Part 0.4, 5.2) <br>(Management organisations diagram)

  • 5. a list of the airworthiness staff referred to in point M.A.707, specifying, where applicable, the staff authorised to issue permits to fly in accordance with point M.A.711(c). <br>(List of Review Staff)

  • 6. a general description and location of the facilities, and;procedures specifying how the continuing airworthiness management organisation ensures compliance with this Part, and; <br>(Facilitetsbeskrivelse + beliggenhed) <br>(Procedurebeskrivelse for compliance med Part MG)

  • 7. the continuing airworthiness management exposition amendment procedures. - (CAME Part 2.2) <br>(Procedurebeskrivelse for ændring af compliance med Part MG)

  • 8. the list of approved aircraft maintenance programmes, or, for aircraft not involved in commercial air transport, the list of “generic” and “baseline” maintenance programmes - (CAME Part 0.6)

  • (b) The continuing airworthiness management exposition and its amendments shall be approved by the competent authority. - (CAME Part 0.6) <br>(SLV godkendelse af procedurebeskrivelse + ændring)

  • (c) Notwithstanding paragraph (b), minor amendments to the exposition may be approved indirectly through an indirect approval procedure. The indirect approval procedure shall define the minor amendment eligible, be established by the continuing airworthiness management organisation as part of the exposition and be approved by the competent authority responsible for that continuing airworthiness management organisation.

  • AMC M.A.704 Continuing airworthiness management exposition<br><br>1. The purpose of the continuing airworthiness management exposition is to set forth the procedures, means and methods of the M.A. Subpart G organisation. Compliance with its contents will assure compliance with Part-M requirements.<br>2. A continuing airworthiness management exposition should comprise:<br>Part 0 General organisation<br>Part 1 Continuing airworthiness procedures<br>Part 2 Quality system or organisational review (as applicable)<br>Part 3 Contracted maintenance (for operators) – management of maintenance (liaison with maintenance organisations in the case of non commercial air transport)<br>Part 4 Airworthiness review procedures (if applicable)<br>3. Where a M.A. Subpart G organisation is also approved to another Part, the exposition or manual required by the other Part may form the basis of the continuing airworthiness management exposition in a combined document. <br><br>Example for a combined Part-145 and M.A. Subpart G organisation:<br>Part-145 Exposition (see equivalent paragraphs in AMC 145.A.70(a))<br>Part 1 Management<br>Part 2 Maintenance procedures<br>Part L2 Additional line maintenance procedures<br>Part 3 Quality system and/or organisational review (as applicable)<br>Part 4 Contracts with owners/operators<br>Part 5 Appendices (sample of documents)<br>Part 7 FAA supplement (if applicable)<br>Part 8 TCCA supplement (if applicable)<br><br>Part 3 should also cover the functions specified by M.A.712 quality system.<br><br>Part 4 should also cover contracted maintenance (for operators) – Management of maintenance (liaison with maintenance organisations in the case of non commercial air transport)<br><br>Additional parts should be introduced covering the following (see equivalent paragraphs in Appendix V to AMC M.A.704, which may have a different numbering system):<br>Part 0 General organisation<br>Part 6 Continuing airworthiness management procedures<br>Part 9 Airworthiness review procedures (if applicable)<br><br>Example for a combined M.A. Subpart F and M.A. Subpart G organisation: <br>M.A. Subpart F Maintenance Organisation Manual (see equivalent paragraphs in Appendix IV to AMC M.A.604, which have a different numbering system)<br>Part 1 General <br>Part 2 Description <br>Part 3 General Procedures <br>Part 4 Working Procedures. This Part contains, among other things, procedures for Organisational Reviews. <br>Part 5 Appendixes <br><br>Part 4 should also cover the functions specified by M.A.712 quality system (or organisation review, as applicable). <br>Additional parts should be introduced covering the following (see equivalent paragraphs in Appendix V to AMC M.A.704, which may have a different numbering system): <br>Part 0 General organisation <br>Part 6 Continuing airworthiness management procedures <br>Part 7 Airworthiness review procedures (if applicable)<br>4. Personnel should be familiar with those parts of the exposition that are relevant to their tasks.<br>5. The M.A. Subpart G organisation should specify in the exposition who is responsible for the amendment of the document.<br>6. Unless otherwise agreed by the approving competent authority, the person responsible for the management of the quality system or for the organisational review should be responsible for monitoring and amending the exposition, including associated procedures manuals, and the submission of proposed amendments to the approving competent authority. The approving competent authority may agree a procedure, which will be stated in the amendment control section of the exposition, defining the class of amendments which can be incorporated without the prior consent of the competent authority.<br>7. The operator may use electronic data processing (EDP) for publication of the continuing airworthiness management exposition. The continuing airworthiness management exposition should be made available to the approving competent authority in a form acceptable to the competent authority. Attention should be paid to the compatibility of EDP publication systems with the necessary dissemination of the continuing airworthiness management exposition, both internally and externally.<br>8. Part 0 “General organisation” of the continuing airworthiness management exposition should include a corporate commitment by the M.A Subpart G organisation, signed by the accountable manager confirming that the continuing airworthiness management exposition and any associated manuals define the organisation compliance with Part-M and will be complied with at all times.<br>9. The accountable manager's exposition statement should embrace the intent of the following paragraph and in fact this statement may be used without amendment. Any modification to the statement should not alter the intent:<br>This exposition defines the organisation and procedures upon which the competent authority* M.A. Subpart G continuing airworthiness management approval is based.<br>These procedures are approved by the undersigned and should be complied with, as applicable, in order to ensure that all continuing airworthiness tasks of..... (Quote operator's name)...... fleet of aircraft and/or of all aircraft under contract in accordance with M.A.201 (e) with..... (Quote organisation's name)...... are carried out on time to an approved standard.<br>It is accepted that these procedures do not override the necessity of complying with any new or amended regulation published from time to time where these new or amended regulations are in conflict with these procedures.<br>It is understood that the competent authority* will approve this organisation whilst the competent authority * is satisfied that the procedures are being followed and the work standard is maintained. It is understood that the competent authority* reserves the right to suspend, vary or revoke the M.A. Subpart G continuing airworthiness management approval of the organisation or the air operators certificate, as applicable, if the competent authority* has evidence that the procedures are not followed and the standards not upheld.<br>Signed .....................................<br>Dated .....................................<br>Accountable Manager and ...(quote position).......<br>For and on behalf of .....(quote organisation's name)...... "<br>*. Where it states competent authority please insert the actual name of the approving competent authority organisation or administration delivering the M.A. Subpart G continuing airworthiness management approval or the air operators certificate. - (CAME Part 0.1)<br>10. Whenever the accountable manager is changed it is important to ensure that the new accountable manager signs the paragraph 9 statement at the earliest opportunity as part of the acceptance by the approving competent authority.<br>Failure to carry out this action invalidates the M.A. Subpart G continuing airworthiness management approval or the air operators’ certificate.<br>11 The exposition should contain information as applicable, on how the continuing airworthiness management organisation complies with CDCCL instructions.<br>Appendix V contains an example of an exposition lay-out.<br><br>Appendix V to AMC M.A.704 Continuing airworthiness management organisationexposition - (CAME Part 0.2)<br>Kan ses i “DECISION NO. 2003/19/RM OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE AGENCY of 28 November 2003” med ændringer i “ED Decition 2010/002/R”

M.A.705 Facilities

  • The continuing airworthiness management organisation shall provide suitable office accommodation at appropriate locations for the personnel specified in M.A.706. <br>(Lys + varme + ingen unødig støj + god rumstørrelse <br>Gældende dokumentation (sidste revision) + tekniske logs + PC + net)

  • AMC M.A.705 Facilities <br>Office accommodation should be such that the incumbents, whether they be continuing airworthiness management, planning, technical records or quality staff, can carry out their designated tasks in a manner that contributes to good standards. In the smaller M.A.Subpart G organisations, the approving competent authority may agree to these tasks being conducted from one office subject to being satisfied that there is sufficient space and that each task can be carried out without undue disturbance. Office accommodation should also include an adequate technical library and room for document consultation.

M.A.706 Personnel requirements

  • AMC M.A.706 Personnel requirements <br>1.​The person or group of persons should represent the continuing airworthiness management structure of the organisation and be responsible for all continuing airworthiness functions. Dependent on the size of the operation and the organisational setup, the continuing airworthiness functions may be divided under individual managers or combined in nearly any number of ways. However, if a quality system is in place it should be independent from the other functions.<br>2.​The actual number of persons to be employed and their necessary qualifications is dependent upon the tasks to be performed and thus dependent on the size and complexity of the organisation (general aviation aircraft, corporate aircraft, number of aircraft and the aircraft types, complexity of the aircraft and their age and for commercial air transport, route network, line or charter, ETOPS) and the amount and complexity of maintenance contracting. Consequently, the number of persons needed, and their qualifications may differ greatly from one organisation to another and a simple formula covering the whole range of possibilities is not feasible.<br>3.​To enable the approving competent authority to accept the number of persons and their qualifications, an organisation should make an analysis of the tasks to be performed, the way in which it intends to divide and/or combine these tasks, indicate how it intends to assign responsibilities and establish the number of man/hours and the qualifications needed to perform the tasks. With significant changes in the aspects relevant to the number and qualifications of persons needed, this analysis should be updated.<br>4.​Nominated person or group of persons should have:<br>4.1.​practical experience and expertise in the application of aviation safety standards and safe operating practices;<br>4.2.​a comprehensive knowledge of:<br>(a).​relevant parts of operational requirements and procedures;<br>(b).​the AOC holder's Operations Specifications when applicable;<br>(c).​the need for, and content of, the relevant parts of the AOC holder's Operations Manual when applicable;<br>4.3.​knowledge of quality systems;<br>4.4.​five years relevant work experience of which at least two years should be from the aeronautical industry in an appropriate position;<br>4.5.​a relevant engineering degree or an aircraft maintenance technician qualification with additional education acceptable to the approving competent authority. ‘relevant engineering degree’ means an engineering degree from aeronautical, mechanical, electrical, electronic, avionic or other studies relevant to the maintenance and continuing airworthiness of aircraft/aircraft components;<br>The above recommendation may be replaced by 5 years of experience additional to those already recommended by paragraph 4.4 above. These 5 years should cover an appropriate combination of experience in tasks related to aircraft maintenance and/or continuing airworthiness management (engineering) and/or surveillance of such tasks.<br>4.6.​thorough knowledge with the organisation's continuing airworthiness management exposition;<br>4.7.​knowledge of a relevant sample of the type(s) of aircraft gained through a formalised training course; These courses should be at least at a level equivalent to Part-66 Appendix III Level 1 General Familiarisation and could be imparted by a Part-147 organisation, by the manufacturer, or by any other organisation accepted by the competent authority.<br>“Relevant sample” means that these courses should cover typical systems embodied in those aircraft being within the scope of approval.<br>For all balloons and any other aircraft of 2730 Kg MTOM and below the formalised training courses may be replaced by demonstration of knowledge. This knowledge may be demonstrated by documented evidence or by an assessment performed by the competent authority. This assessment should be recorded.<br>4.8.​knowledge of maintenance methods.<br>4.9.​knowledge of applicable regulations.<br>

  • (a) The organisation shall appoint an accountable manager, who has corporate authority for ensuring that all continuing airworthiness management activities can be financed and carried out in accordance with this Part. - (CAME Part 0.3.1)<br>(Udpeget Accountable Manager)

  • AMC M.A.706 (a) Personnel requirements<br>Accountable manager is normally intended to mean the chief executive officer of the continuing airworthiness management organisation approved under M.A. Subpart G, who by virtue of position has overall (including in particular financial) responsibility for running the organisation. The accountable manager may be the accountable manager for more than one organisation and is not required to be knowledgeable on technical matters. When the accountable manager is not the chief executive officer, the competent authority will need to be assured that such an accountable manager has direct access to the chief executive officer and has a sufficiency of continuing airworthiness funding allocation.

  • (b) For commercial air transport the paragraph (a) accountable manager shall be the person who also has corporate authority for ensuring that all the operations of the operator can be financed and carried out to the standard required for the issue of an air operator's certificate. - (CAME Part 0.3.1)<br>(Kan Acc Mgr sikre at part MG bliver udført overens med AOC krav)

  • (c) A person or group of persons shall be nominated with the responsibility of ensuring that the organisation is always in compliance with this Subpart. Such person(s) shall be ultimately responsible to the accountable manager. - (CAME Part 0.3.2, 0.3.4, 0.3.5.1, 2.6)<br>(Udpeget ansvarlig, som sikre at Part MG altid bliver opfyldt)

  • (d) For commercial air transport, the accountable manager shall designate a nominated post holder. This person shall be responsible for the management and supervision of continuing airworthiness activities, pursuant to paragraph (c). - (CAME Part 0.3.2)<br>(Udpeget ansvarlig for adm. + overvågning af vedvarende luftdygtighed)

  • (e) The nominated post holder referred to in paragraph (d) shall not be employed by a Part-145 approved organisation under contract to the<br>operator, unless specifically agreed by the competent authority.<br>((d) må ikke være ansat i Part 145)<br>

  • AMC M.A.706 (e) Personnel requirements<br>1. The competent authority of the operator should only accept that the nominated post holder be employed by the organisation approved under Part-145 when it is manifest that he/she is the only available competent person in a position to exercise this function, within a practical working distance from the operator’s offices.<br>2. This paragraph only applies to contracted maintenance and therefore does not affect situations where the organisation approved under Part-145 and the operator is the same organisation.

  • (f) The organisation shall have sufficient appropriately qualified staff for the expected work. - (CAME Part 0.3.4, 0.3.5, 0.3.5.2)<br>(Tilstrækkelig kvalificeret personale til at adm. vedvarende luftdygtighed)

  • AMC M.A.706(f) Personnel requirements (Note: Appendix AMC XII)<br>Additional training in fuel tank safety as well as associated inspection standards and maintenance procedures should be required of continuing airworthiness management organisations’ technical personnel, especially the staff involved with the management of CDCCL, Service Bulletin assessment, work planning and maintenance programme management. EASA guidance is provided for training to Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisations’ continuing airworthiness personnel in Appendix AMC XII to AMC to M.A.706(f) and M.B.102(c).

  • (g) All paragraph (c) and (d) persons shall be able to show relevant knowledge, background and appropriate experience related to aircraft continuing airworthiness. - (CAME Part 0.3.5, 0.3.5.2)<br>(Har (c) + (d) relevant viden + erfaring med vedvarende luftdygtighed)

  • (h) The qualification of all personnel involved in continuing airworthiness management shall be recorded. - (CAME Part 0.3.5, 0.3.5.1)<br>(Kvalifikationsregister på personel der star for vedvarende luftdygtighed)

  • (i) For organisations extending airworthiness review certificates in<br>accordance with points M.A.711(a)4 and M.A.901(f), the organisation shall nominate persons authorised to do so, subject to approval by the competent authority. - (CAME Part 4.2)

  • AMC M.A.706(i) Personnel requirements<br>The approval by the competent authority of the exposition, containing in M.A.704(a)3 the list of M.A.706(i) personnel, constitutes their formal acceptance by the competent authority and also their formal authorisation by the organisation.<br>Airworthiness review staff are automatically recognised as persons with authority to extend an airworthiness review certificate in accordance with M.A.711(a)4 and M.A.901(f).

  • (j) The organisation shall define and keep updated in the continuing airworthiness management exposition the title(s) and name(s) of person(s) referred to in points M.A.706(a), M.A.706(c), M.A.706(d) and M.A.706(i). - (CAME Part 4.2)

  • (k) For all large aircraft and for aircraft used for commercial air transport the organisation shall establish and control the competence of personnel involved in the continuing airworthiness management, airworthiness review and/or quality audits in accordance with a procedure and to a standard agreed by the competent authority.<br>- (CAME Part 4.2)

  • AMC M.A.706(k) Personnel requirements<br>Adequate initial and recurrent training should be provided and recorded to ensure continued competence.

  • Appendix AMC XII to AMC to M.A.706(f) and M.B.102(c)<br>Fuel Tank Safety training<br>This appendix includes general instructions for providing training on Fuel Tank Safety issues.<br>A) Effectivity:<br>• Large aeroplanes as defined in Decision 2003/11/RM of the Executive Director of the Agency (CS25) and certified after 1 January 1958 with a maximum type certified passenger capacity of 30 or more or a maximum certified payload capacity of 7500 lbs (3402 kg) cargo or more, and<br>• Large aeroplanes as defined in Decision 2003/11/RM of the Executive Director of the Agency (CS25) which contains CS25 amendment 1 or later in their certification basis.<br>B) Affected organisations:<br>• M.A. Subpart G approved organisations involved in the continuing airworthiness management of aeroplanes specified in paragraph A).<br>• Competent authorities responsible for the oversight as per M.B.704 of aeroplanes specified in paragraph A) and for the oversight of the M.A. Subpart G approved organisations specified in this paragraph B).<br>C) Persons from affected organisations who should receive training:<br>Phase 1 only:<br>• The quality manager and quality personnel.<br>• Personnel of the competent authorities responsible for the oversight as per M.B.704 of aeroplanes specified in paragraph A) and in the oversight of M.A. Subpart G approved organisations specified in paragraph B).<br>Phase 1 + Phase 2 + Continuation training:<br>• Personnel of the M.A. Subpart G organisation involved in the management and review of the continuing airworthiness of aircraft specified in paragraph A);<br>D) General requirements of the training courses<br>Phase 1 – Awareness<br>The training should be carried out before the person starts to work without supervision but not later than 6 months after joining the organisation. The persons who have already attended the Level 1 Familiarisation course in compliance with ED decision 2007/001/R Appendix XII are already in compliance with Phase 1.<br>Type:​Should be an awareness course with the principal elements of the subject. It may take the form of a training bulletin, or other self study or informative session. Signature of the reader is required to ensure that the person has passed the training.<br>Level:​It should be a course at the level of familiarisation with the principal elements of the subject.<br>Objectives:<br>The trainee should, after the completion of the training:<br>1. Be familiar with the basic elements of the fuel tank safety issues.<br>2. Be able to give a simple description of the historical background and the elements requiring a safety consideration, using common words and showing examples of non conformities.<br>3. Be able to use typical terms.<br>Content:​The course should include:<br>- A short background showing examples of FTS accidents or incidents,<br>- The description of concept of fuel tank safety and CDCCL,<br>- Some examples of manufacturers documents showing CDCCL items,<br>- Typical examples of FTS defects,<br>- Some examples of TC holders repair data<br>- Some examples of maintenance instructions for inspection.<br>Phase 2 Detailed training<br>A flexible period may be allowed by the competent authorities to allow organisations to set the necessary courses and impart the training to the personnel, taking into account the organisation’s training schemes/means/practices. This flexible period should not extend beyond 31 December 2010.<br>The persons who have already attended the Level 2 Detailed training course in compliance with ED decision 2007/001/R Appendix XII either from a M.A. Subpart G approved organisation or from a Part147 training organisation are already in compliance with Phase 2 with the exception of continuation training. Staff should have received Phase 2 training by 31 December 2010 or within 12 months of joining the organization, whichever comes later.<br>Type:​Should be a more indepth internal or external course. It should not take the form of a training bulletin or other self study. An examination should be required at the end, which should be in the form of a multi choice question, and the pass mark of the examination should be 75%.<br>Level:​It should be a detailed course on the theoretical and practical elements of the subject.<br>The training may be made either:<br>- In appropriate facilities containing examples of components, systems and parts affected by Fuel Tank Safety (FTS) issues. The use of films, pictures and practical examples on FTS is recommended; or<br>- By attending a distance course (e-learning or computer based training) including a film when such film meets the intent of the objectives and content here below. An e-learning or computer based training should meet the following criteria:<br>- A continuous evaluation process should ensure the effectiveness of the training and its relevance;<br>- Some questions at intermediate steps of the training should be proposed to ensure that the trainee is authorized to move to the next step;<br>- The content and results of examinations should be recorded;<br>- Access to an instructor in person or at distance should be possible in case support is needed.<br>A duration of 8 hours for phase 2 is an acceptable compliance.<br>When the course is provided in a classroom, the instructor should be very familiar with the data in Objectives and Guidelines. To be familiar, an instructor should have attended himself a similar course in a classroom and made additionally some lecture of related subjects.<br>Objectives:<br>The attendant should, after the completion of the training:<br>- Have knowledge of the history of events related to fuel tank safety issues and the theoretical and practical elements of the subject, have an overview of the FAA regulations known as SFAR (Special FAR) 88 of the FAA and of JAA Temporary Guidance Leaflet TGL 47, be able to give a detailed description of the concept of fuel tank system ALI (including Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations CDCCL, and using theoretical fundamentals and specific examples;<br>- Have the capacity to combine and apply the separate elements of knowledge in a logical and comprehensive manner;<br>- Have knowledge on how the above items affect the aircraft;<br>- Be able to identify the components or parts or the aircraft subject to FTS from the manufacturer’s documentation,<br>- Be able to plan the action or apply a Service Bulletin and an Airworthiness Directive.<br>Content:​Following the guidelines described in paragraph E).<br>Continuation training:<br>The organisation should ensure that the continuation training is performed in each two years period. The syllabus of the training programme referred to in the Training policy of the Continuing Airworthiness Management Exposition (CAME) should contain the additional syllabus for this continuation training.<br>The continuation training may be combined with the phase 2 training in a classroom or at distance.<br>The continuing training should be updated when new instructions are issued which are related to the material, tools, documentation and manufacturer’s or competent authority’s directives.<br>E) Guidelines for preparing the content of Phase 2 courses.<br>The following guidelines should be taken into consideration when the phase 2 training programme are being established:<br>(a) understanding of the background and the concept of fuel tank safety,<br>(b) how the mechanics can recognise, interpret and handle the improvements in the instructions for continuing airworthiness that have been made or are being made regarding fuel tank systems,<br>(c) awareness of any hazards especially when working on the fuel system, and when the Flammability Reduction System using nitrogen is installed.<br>Paragraphs a) b) and c) above should be introduced in the training programme addressing the following issues:<br>i) The theoretical background behind the risk of fuel tank safety: the explosions of mixtures of fuel and air, the behavior of those mixtures in an aviation environment, the effects of temperature and pressure, energy needed for ignition etc, the ‘fire triangle’, Explain 2 concepts to prevent explosions:<br>(1) ignition source prevention and<br>(2) flammability reduction,<br>ii) The major accidents related to fuel tank systems, the accident investigations and their conclusions,<br>iii) SFAR 88 of the FAA and JAA Interim Policy INT POL 25/12: ignition prevention program initiatives and goals, to identify unsafe conditions and to correct them, to systematically improve fuel tank maintenance),<br>iv) Explain briefly the concepts that are being used: the results of SFAR 88 of the FAA and JAA INT/POL 25/12: modifications, airworthiness limitations items and CDCCL,<br>v) Where relevant information can be found and how to use and interpret this information in the various instructions for continuing airworthiness (aircraft maintenance manuals, component maintenance manuals…),<br>vi) Fuel Tank Safety during maintenance: fuel tank entry and exit procedures, clean working environment, what is meant by configuration control, wire separation, bonding of components etc,<br>vii) Flammability reduction systems when installed: reason for their presence, their effects, the hazards of an Flammability Reduction System (FRS) using nitrogen for maintenance, safety precautions in maintenance/working with an FRS,<br>viii) Recording maintenance actions, recording measures and results of inspections.<br>The training should include a representative number of examples of defects and the associated repairs as required by the TC / STC holders maintenance data.<br>F) Approval of training<br>For M.A. Subpart G approved organisations the approval of the initial and continuation training programme and the content of the examination can be achieved by the change of the CAME exposition. The modification of the CAME should be approved as required by M.A. 704(b). The necessary changes to the CAME to meet the content of this decision should be made and implemented at the time requested by the competent authority.

M.A.707 Airworthiness review staff

  • (a) To be approved to carry out airworthiness reviews and, if applicable, to issue permits to fly, an approved continuing airworthiness management organisation shall have appropriate airworthiness review staff to issue airworthiness review certificates or recommendations referred to in Section A of Subpart I and, if applicable, to issue a permit to fly in accordance with point M.A.711(c):<br>1. For all aircraft used in commercial air transport, and aircraft above 2 730 kg MTOM, except balloons, these staff shall have acquired:<br>(a) at least five years’ experience in continuing airworthiness; and<br>(b) an appropriate license in compliance with Annex III (Part-66) or an aeronautical degree or a<br>national equivalent; and<br>(c) formal aeronautical maintenance training; and<br>(d) a position within the approved organisation with appropriate responsibilities.<br>(e) Notwithstanding points (a) to (d), the requirement laid down in point M.A.707(a)1(b) may be<br>replaced by five years of experience in continuing airworthiness additional to those already<br>required by point M.A.707(a)1(a).<br>2. For aircraft not used in commercial air transport of 2 730 kg MTOM and below, and balloons, these<br>staff shall have acquired:<br>(a) at least three years’ experience in continuing airworthiness, and<br>(b) an appropriate license in compliance with Annex III (Part-66) or an aeronautical degree or a<br>national equivalent; and<br>(c) appropriate aeronautical maintenance training; and<br>(d) a position within the approved organisation with appropriate responsibilities;<br>(e) Notwithstanding points (a) to (d), the requirement laid down in point M.A.707(a)2(b) may be<br>replaced by four years of experience in continuing airworthiness additional to those already<br>required by point M.A.707(a)2(a). - (CAME Part 4.1)

  • AMC M.A.707 (a) Airworthiness review staff<br>1.​Airworthiness review staff are only required if the M.A. Subpart G organisation wants to be granted M.A.711 (b) airworthiness review and, if applicable, M.A.711 (c) permit to flyprivileges.<br>2.​““experience in continuing airworthiness” means any appropriate combination of experience in tasks related to aircraft maintenance and/or continuing airworthiness management (engineering) and/or surveillance of such tasks.<br>3​. A person qualified to the AMC M.A.706 subparagraph 4.5 should be considered as holding the equivalent to an aeronautical degree.<br>4. An appropriate licence in compliance with Annex III (Part-66) is any one of the following:<br>- a category B1 licence in the subcategory of the aircraft reviewed, or<br>- a category B2 or C licence, or<br>- in the case of piston-engine non-pressurised aeroplanes of 2 000 kg MTOM and below, a category B3 licence.<br>It is not necessary to satisfy the experience requirements of Part-66 at the time of the review.<br>5.​To hold a position with appropriate responsibilities means the airworthiness review staff should have a position in the organisation independent from the airworthiness management process or with overall authority on the airworthiness management process of complete aircraft.<br>Independence from the airworthiness management process may be achieved, among other ways, by:<br>• Being authorised to perform airworthiness reviews only on aircraft for which the person has not participated in their management. For example, performing airworthiness reviews on a specific model line, while being involved in the airworthiness management of a different model line.<br>• M.A. Subpart G organisations with Part-145/M.A.Subpart F approval, may nominate maintenance personnel from their Part-145/M.A. Subpart F organisation as airworthiness review staff, as long as they are not involved in the airworthiness management of the aircraft. These personnel should not have been involved in the release to service of that particular aircraft (other than maintenance tasks performed during the physical survey of the aircraft or performed as a result of findings discovered during such physical survey) to avoid possible conflict of interests.<br>• Nominating as airworthiness review staff personnel from the Quality Department of the continuing airworthiness management organisation.<br>Overall authority on the airworthiness management process of complete aircraft may be achieved, among other ways, by:<br>• Nominating as airworthiness review staff the Accountable Manager or the Maintenance Postholder.<br>• Being authorised to perform airworthiness reviews only on those particular aircraft for which the person is responsible for the complete continuing airworthiness management process.<br>• In the case of one-man organisations, this person has always overall authority. This means that this person can be nominated as airworthiness review staff.

  • AMC M.A.707 (a)(1) Airworthiness review staff<br>For all aircraft used in commercial air transport and any other aircraft, other than balloons, above 2730 kg MTOM, formal aeronautical maintenance training means training (internal or external) supported by evidence on the following subjects:<br>• Relevant parts of initial and continuing airworthiness regulations.<br>• Relevant parts of operational requirements and procedures, if applicable.<br>• The organisation’s continuing airworthiness management exposition.<br>• Knowledge of a relevant sample of the type(s) of aircraft gained through a formalised training course. These courses should be at least at a level equivalent to Part-66 Appendix III Level 1 General Familiarisation and could be imparted by a Part-147 organisation, by the manufacturer, or by any other organisation accepted by the competent authority.<br>“Relevant sample” means that these courses should cover typical systems embodied in those aircraft being within the scope of approval.<br>• Maintenance methods.

  • AMC M.A.707 (a)(2) Airworthiness review staff<br>For all balloons and any other aircraft of 2730 Kg MTOM and below, not used in commercial air transport:<br>1.​“experience in continuing airworthiness” can be full-time or part-time, either as professional or on a voluntary basis.<br>2.​Appropriate aeronautical maintenance training means demonstrated knowledge of the following subjects:<br>• Relevant parts of initial and continuing airworthiness regulations.<br>• Relevant parts of operational requirements and procedures, if applicable.<br>• The organisation’s continuing airworthiness management exposition.<br>• Knowledge of a relevant sample of the type(s) of aircraft gained through training and/or work experience. Such knowledge should be at least at a level equivalent to Part-66 Appendix III Level 1 General Familiarisation and could be imparted by a Part-147 organisation, by the manufacturer, or by any other organisation accepted by the competent authority.<br>“Relevant sample” means that these courses should cover typical systems embodied in those aircraft being within the scope of approval<br>• Maintenance methods.<br>This knowledge may be demonstrated by documented evidence or by an assessment performed by the competent authority or by other airworthiness review staff already authorised within the organisation in accordance with approved procedures. This assessment should be recorded.

  • (b) Airworthiness review staff nominated by the approved continuing airworthiness organisation can only be issued an authorisation by the approved continuing airworthiness organisation when formally accepted by the competent authority after satisfactory completion of an airworthiness review under supervision. - (CAME Part 4.1)

  • AMC M.A.707 (b) Airworthiness review staff<br>The formal acceptance by the competent authority of the airworthiness review staff is granted through the corresponding EASA Form 4.<br>An airworthiness review “under supervision” means under the supervision of the competent authority. If the organisation has already properly authorised airworthiness review staff, the competent authority may accept that the supervision be performed by this existing airworthiness review staff in accordance with an approved procedure. In such case, evidence of the airworthiness review performed under supervision should be provided to the competent authority together with the EASA Form 4. If satisfied, the competent authority will issue the formal acceptance through the EASA Form 4.<br>Once the airworthiness review staff have been accepted by the competent authority, the inclusion of their name in the exposition (refer to M.A.704(a)5) constitutes the formal authorisation by the organisation.

  • (c) The organisation shall ensure that aircraft airworthiness review staff can demonstrate appropriate recent continuing airworthiness management experience. - (CAME Part 4.1)

  • AMC M.A.707 (c) Airworthiness review staff<br>In order to keep the validity of the airworthiness review staff authorisation, the airworthiness review staff should have either:<br>• been involved in continuing airworthiness management activities for at least six months in every two year period, or<br>• conducted at least one airworthiness review in the last twelve month period.<br>In order to restore the validity of the authorisation, the airworthiness review staff should conduct at a satisfactory level an airworthiness review under the supervision of the competent authority or, if accepted by the competent authority, under the supervision of another currently valid authorised airworthiness review staff of the concerned continuing airworthiness management organisation in accordance with an approved procedure.

  • (d) Airworthiness review staff shall be identified by listing each person in the continuing airworthiness management exposition together with their airworthiness review authorisation reference. - (CAME Part 4.1)

  • (e) The organisation shall maintain a record of all airworthiness review staff, which shall include details of any appropriate qualification held together with a summary of relevant continuing airworthiness management experience and training and a copy of the authorisation. This record shall be retained until two years after the airworthiness review staff have left the organisation. - (CAME Part 4.1)

  • AMC M.A.707(e) Airworthiness review staff<br>The minimum content of the airworthiness review staff record should be:<br>- Name,<br>- Date of Birth,<br>- Basic Education,<br>- Experience,<br>- Aeronautical Degree and/or Part-66 qualification and/or nationally-recognised maintenance personnel qualification,<br>- Initial Training received,<br>- Type of Training received,<br>- Continuation Training received,<br>- Experience in continuing airworthiness and within the organisation,<br>- Responsibilities of current role in the organisation,<br>- Copy of the authorisation.

M.A.708 Continuing airworthiness management - (CAME Part 0.3.4)

  • (a) All continuing airworthiness management shall be carried out according to the prescriptions of M.A Subpart C.<br>Sikring af vedvarende luftdygtighed udføres til M.A subpart C (300 serien)

  • (b) For every aircraft managed, the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation shall:<br>1. develop and control a maintenance programme for the aircraft managed including any applicable reliability programme, - (CAME Part 2.3)<br>(Vedligeholdelsesprogram på hvert enkelt fly + dokumentationsplan)<br>2. Present the aircraft maintenance programme and its amendments to the competent authority for approval, unless covered by an indirect approval procedure in accordance with point M.A.302(c), and provide a copy of the programme to the owner of aircraft not involved in commercial air transport, - (CAME Part 2.4, 2.5) <br>(Vedligeholdelsesprogram godkendt af SLV (+ ikke erhvervsmæssig ejer))<br>3. manage the approval of modification and repairs, - (CAME Part 1. 9)<br>(Varetager Part MG org. godkendelse af rep. + ændringer?)<br>4. ensure that all maintenance is carried out in accordance with the approved maintenance programme and released in accordance with M.A. Subpart H,<br>(Vedligehold udføres i henhold til vedligeholdelsesprogram + frigives fly i henhold til M.A. subpart H? (800 serien))<br>5. ensure that all applicable airworthiness directives and operational directives with a continuing airworthiness impact, are applied,<br>- (CAME Part 1. 4)<br>(Anvendes gældende AD-notes + OD-notes?)<br>6. ensure that all defects discovered during scheduled maintenance or reported are corrected by an appropriately approved maintenance organisation,<br>(Ved planlagt vedligehold sikrer Part MG Org. at alle fejl rettes på et 145 værksted?)<br>7. ensure that the aircraft is taken to an appropriately approved maintenance organisation whenever necessary,<br>(Sikrer Part MG Org. at flyet kommer på et 145 værksted, hvis nødvendigt?) <br>8. coordinate scheduled maintenance, the application of airworthiness directives, the replacement of service life limited parts, and component inspection to ensure the work is carried out properly,<br>(Planlagt vedligehold + AD notes + komponentudskift skal styres af Part MG)<br>9. manage and archive all continuing airworthiness records and/or operator's technical log.<br>(Part MG Org. skal admin. + arkivere W/O + luftfartsforetagenets tekniske logs)<br>10. ensure that the mass and balance statement reflects the current status of the aircraft.<br>(Part MG Org. sikrer at vægt/balance er “up to date” (hvert 4. år på EU-Ops fly )(ref. OPS 1.605))

  • AMC M.A.708(b)3. Continuing Airworthiness Management<br>When managing the approval of modifications or repairs the organisation should ensure that Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations are taken into account.

  • (c) ​In the case of commercial air transport, when the operator is not appropriately approved to Part-145, the operator shall establish a written maintenance contract between the operator and a Part-145 approved organisation or another operator, detailing the functions specified under M.A.301-2, M.A.301-3, M.A.301-5 and M.A.301-6, ensuring that all maintenance is ultimately carried out by a Part-145 approved maintenance organisation and defining the support of the quality functions of M.A.712(b). The aircraft base, scheduled line maintenance and engine maintenance contracts, together with all amendments, shall be approved by the competent authority. <br>However, in the case of: - (CAME Part 3.1)<br>(Skriftlig vedligeholdelseskontrakt mellem Part MG og Part 145 )<br>1. an aircraft requiring unscheduled line maintenance, the contract may be in the form of individual work orders addressed to the Part-145 maintenance organisation.<br>(Kræver flyet ikke planlagt rutevedligehold, er der W/O?)<br>2. component maintenance, including engine maintenance, the contract as referred to in paragraph (c) may be in the form of individual work orders addressed to the Part-145 maintenance organisation.<br>(Komponent og motorvedligehold, er der W/O?)

  • AMC M.A.708 (c) Continuing airworthiness management (Note: Appendix AMC XI)<br>1. Where an operator is not approved under Part-145 or an operator’s maintenance organisation is an independent organisation, a contract should be agreed between the operator and a maintenance organisation approved under Part-145, which specifies, in detail, the work to be performed by the maintenance organisation. Appendix AMC XI to this AMC gives further details on the subject.<br>2. Both the specification of work and the assignment of responsibilities should be clear, unambiguous and sufficiently detailed to ensure that no misunderstanding should arise between the parties concerned (operator, maintenance organisation and the competent authority) that could result in a situation where work that has a bearing on the airworthiness or serviceability of aircraft is not or will not be properly performed.<br>3. Special attention should be paid to procedures and responsibilities to ensure that all maintenance work is performed, service bulletins are analysed and decisions taken on accomplishment, airworthiness directives are completed on time and that all work, including non-mandatory modifications is carried out to approved data and to the latest standards.<br>4. For line maintenance, the actual layout of the contract the IATA Standard Ground Handling Agreement may be used as a basis, but this does not preclude the competent authority of operator from ensuring that the content of the contract is acceptable to them, and especially that the contract allows the operator to properly exercise its maintenance responsibility. Those parts of a contract that have no bearing on the technical or operational aspects of airworthiness are outside the scope of this paragraph.<br>5. It is possible to contract another operator that is not directly approved under Part-145. In this case the operator’s continuing airworthiness management exposition should include appropriate procedures to ensure that all this contracted maintenance is ultimately performed on time by organisations approved under Part-145 in accordance with the contracting operator’s data. In particular the quality system procedures should place great emphasis on monitoring compliance with the above. The list of Part-145 approved contractors, or a reference to this list, should be included in the operator’s continuing airworthiness management exposition.<br>6. Such a maintenance arrangement does not absolve the operator from its overall continuing airworthiness responsibility. Specifically, in order to accept the maintenance arrangement, the competent authority should be satisfied that such an arrangement allows the operator to ensure full compliance with responsibilities pursuant to M.A.201.<br>7. The purpose of M.A.708(c) is to ensure that all maintenance is carried out by properly approved Part-145 organisations. This does not preclude a primary maintenance arrangement with an operator that is not such an organisation, when it proves that such an arrangement is in the interest of the operator by simplifying the management of its maintenance, and the operator keeps an appropriate control of it. Such an arrangement should not preclude the operator from ensuring that all maintenance is performed by a Part-145 approved organisation and complying with the M.A.201 continuing airworthiness responsibility requirements. Typical examples of such arrangements follow:<br>- Component maintenance:<br>The operator may find it more appropriate to have a primary contractor, that would despatch the components to appropriately approved organisations, rather than sending himself different types of components to various maintenance organisations approved under Part-145. The benefit for the operator is that the management of maintenance is simplified by having a single contact point for component maintenance. The operator remains responsible for ensuring that all maintenance is performed by maintenance organisations approved under Part-145 and in accordance with the approved standard.<br>- Aircraft, engine and component maintenance:<br>The operator may wish to have a maintenance contract with another operator of the same type of aircraft not approved under Part-145. A typical case is that of a dry-leased aeroplane between operators, where the parties, for consistency or continuity reasons (especially for short term lease agreements) find it appropriate to keep the aeroplane under the current maintenance arrangement. Where this arrangement involves various Part 145 approved contractors, it might be more manageable for the lessee operator to have a single contract with the lessor operator. Such an arrangement should not be understood as a transfer of responsibility to the lessor operator: the lessee operator, being the approved operator of the aircraft, remains responsible for the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft in performing the M.A.708 functions, and employing the M.A.706 continuing airworthiness management group of persons and staff.<br>In essence, this does not alter the intent of M.A.201 (h) in that it also requires that the operator has to establish a written maintenance contract acceptable to the competent authority of operator and, whatever type of acceptable arrangement is made, the operator is required to exercise the same level of control on contracted maintenance, particularly through the M.A.706 (c) continuing airworthiness management group of persons and quality system as referred to in M.A.712.

  • AMC M.A.708 (c) (1) Continuing airworthiness management –unscheduled maintenance<br>The intent of this paragraph is that maintenance contracts are not necessary when the operator’s continuing airworthiness system, as approved by the competent authority of operator, specifies that the relevant maintenance activity may be ordered through one time work orders. This includes for obvious reasons unscheduled line maintenance and may also include aeroplane component maintenance up to engines, so long as the competent authority of operator considers that the maintenance is manageable through work orders, both in term of volume and complexity. It should be noted that this paragraph implies that even where base maintenance is ordered on a case-by-case basis, there should be a written maintenance contract.

  • Appendix AMC XI to AMC to M.A.708(c)<br><br>CONTRACTED MAINTENANCE<br><br>1.​Maintenance contracts<br><br>The following paragraphs are not intended to provide a standard maintenance contract but to provide a list of the main points that should be addressed, when applicable, in a maintenance contract between an Operator and a Part-145 approved organisation. As only the technical parts of the maintenance contracts have to be acceptable to the competent authority, the following paragraphs only address technical matters and exclude matters such as costs, delay, warranty, etc...<br><br>When maintenance is contracted to more than one Part-145 approved organisation (for example aircraft base maintenance to X, engine maintenance to Y and line maintenance to Z1, Z2&Z3), attention should be paid to the consistency of the different maintenance contracts.<br><br>A maintenance contract is not normally intended to provide appropriate detailed work instruction to the personnel (and is not normally distributed as such). Accordingly there should be established organisational responsibility, procedures and routines in the operator’s M.A. Subpart G & Part-145 organisations to take care of these functions in a satisfactory way such that any person involved is informed about his/her responsibility and the procedures which apply. These procedures and routines can be included/appended to the operator’s CAME and maintenance organisation’s MOE or consist in separate procedures. In other words procedures and routines should reflect the conditions of the contract.<br><br>2.​Aircraft/Engine maintenance<br><br>The following subparagraphs may be adapted to a maintenance contract that applies to aircraft base maintenance, aircraft line maintenance and engine maintenance.<br><br>Aircraft maintenance also includes the maintenance of the engines and APU while they are installed on the aircraft.<br><br>2.1.​Scope of work<br><br>The type of maintenance to be performed by the Part-145 approved organization should be specified unambiguously. In case of line and/or base maintenance, the contract should specify the aircraft type and, preferably include the aircraft’s registrations.<br><br>In case of engine maintenance, the contract should specify the engine type.<br><br>2.2.​Locations identified for the performance of maintenance/ Certificates held<br><br>The place(s) where base, line or engine maintenance, as applicable, will be performed should be specified. The certificate held by the maintenance organisation at the place(s) where the maintenance will be performed should be referred to in the contract. If necessary the contract may address the possibility of performing maintenance at any location subject to the need for such maintenance arising either from the unserviceability of the aircraft or from the necessity of supporting occasional line maintenance.<br><br>2.3.​Subcontracting<br><br>The maintenance contract should specify under which conditions the Part-145 approved organisation may subcontract tasks to a third party (whether this third party is Part-145 approved or not). At least the contract should make reference to 145.A.75. Additional guidance is provided by the AMC 145.A.75. In addition the operator may require the Part-145 approved organisation to obtain the operator’s approval before subcontracting to a third party. Access should be given to the operator to any information (especially the quality monitoring information) about the Part-145 approved organisation’s subcontractors involved in the contract. It should however be noted that under operators responsibility both the operator and its competent authority are entitled to be fully informed about subcontracting, although the competent authority will normally only be concerned with aircraft, engine and APU subcontracting.<br><br>2.4.​Maintenance programme<br><br>The maintenance programme under which the maintenance has to be performed has to be specified. The operator should have that maintenance programme approved by its competent authority. When the maintenance programme is used by several operators, it is important to remember that it is the responsibility of each operator to have that maintenance programme approved under its own name by its competent authority.<br><br>2.5.​Quality monitoring<br><br>The terms of the contract should include a provision allowing the operator to perform a quality surveillance (including audits) upon the Part-145 approved organisation. The maintenance contract should specify how the results of the quality surveillance are taken into account by the Part-145 approved organization (See also paragraph 2.22. ‘Meetings’).<br><br>2.6.​Competent authority involvement<br><br>When the operator’s competent authority and the Part-145 approved organisation’s competent authority is not the same, the operator and the Part-145 approved organisation have to ensure together with their competent authority that the respective competent authority’s responsibilities are properly defined and that, if necessary, delegations have been established.<br><br>2.7.​Airworthiness data<br><br>The airworthiness data used for the purpose of this contract as well as the authority responsible for the acceptance/approval should be specified. This may include, but may not be limited to:<br><br>- maintenance programme,<br>- airworthiness directives,<br>- major repairs/modification data,<br>- aircraft maintenance manual,<br>- aircraft IPC,<br>- wiring diagrams,<br>- trouble shooting manual,<br>- Minimum Equipment List (normally on board the aircraft),<br>- operators manual,<br>- Flight Manual,<br>- engine maintenance manual,<br>- engine overhaul manual.<br>2.8.​Incoming Conditions<br><br>The contract should specify in which condition the operator should send the aircraft to the Part-145 approved organisation. For checks of significance i.e. ‘C’ checks and above, it may be beneficial that a work scope planning meeting be organised so that the tasks to be performed may be commonly agreed (see also paragraph 2.23: ‘Meetings’).<br><br>2.9.​Airworthiness Directives and Service Bulletin/Modifications<br><br>The contract should specify what information the operator is responsible to provide to the Part-145 approved organisation, such as the due date of the airworthiness directives (ADs), the selected means of compliance, the decision to embody Service Bulletins (SBs) or modification, etc. In addition the type of information the operator will need in return to complete the control of ADs and modification status should be specified.<br><br>2.10.​Hours & Cycles control<br><br>Hours and cycles control is the responsibility of the operator, but there may be cases where the Part-145 approved organisation should receive the current flight hours and cycles on a regular basis so that it may update the records for its own planning functions (see also paragraph 2.22: ‘Exchange of information’).<br><br>2.11.​Service life-limited components<br><br>Service life-limited components control is the responsibility of the operator. The Part-145 approved organisation will have to provide the operator with all the necessary information about the service life-limited components removal/installation so that the operator may update its records (see also paragraph 2.22 ‘Exchange of information’).<br><br>2.12.​Supply of parts<br><br>The contract should specify whether a particular type of material or component is supplied by the operator or by the contracted Part-145 approved organisation, which type of component is pooled, etc. The contract should clearly state that it is the Part-145 competence and responsibility to be in any case satisfied that the component in question meets the approved data/standard and to ensure that the aircraft component is in a satisfactory condition for installation. In other words, there is definitely no way for a Part-145 organisation to accept whatever is supplied by the operator. Additional guidance is provided by 145.A.42 for acceptance of components.<br><br>2.13.​Pooled parts at line stations<br><br>If applicable the contract should specify how the subject of pooled parts at line stations should be addressed.<br><br>2.14.​Scheduled maintenance<br><br>For planning scheduled maintenance checks, the support documentation to be given to the Part-145 approved organisation should be specified. This may include, but may not be limited to:<br><br>- applicable work package, including job cards;<br>- scheduled component removal list;<br>- modifications to be incorporated.<br>When the Part-145 approved organisation determines, for any reason, to defer a maintenance task, it has to be formally agreed with the operator. If the deferment goes beyond an approved limit, refer to paragraph 2.17: ‘Deviation from the maintenance schedule’. This should be addressed, where applicable, in the maintenance contract.<br><br>2.15.​Unscheduled maintenance/Defect rectification<br><br>The contract should specify to which level the Part-145 approved organization may rectify a defect without reference to the operator. As a minimum, the approval and incorporation of major repairs should be addressed. The deferment of any defect rectification should be submitted to the operator and, if applicable, to its competent authority.<br><br>2.16.​Deferred tasks<br><br>See paragraphs 2.14 and 2.15 above and AMC 145.A.50 (e). In addition, for aircraft line and base maintenance the use of the operator’s MEL and the relation with the operator in case of a defect that cannot be rectified at the line station should be addressed.<br><br>2.17.​Deviation from the maintenance schedule<br><br>Deviations have to be requested by the operator to its competent authority or granted by the operator in accordance with a procedure acceptable to its competent authority. The contract should specify the support the Part-145 approved organisation may provide to the operator in order to substantiate the deviation request.<br><br>2.18.​Test flight<br><br>If any test flight is required after aircraft maintenance, it should be performed in accordance with the procedures established in the operator’s Continuing continuing airworthiness management exposition.<br><br>2.19​Bench Test<br><br>The contract should specify the acceptability criterion and whether a representative of the operator should witness an engine undergoing test.<br><br>2.20​Release to service documentation<br><br>The release to service has to be performed by the Part-145 approved organization in accordance with its MOE procedures. The contract should, however, specify which support forms have to be used (Operator’s technical log, Part-145 approved organisation’s maintenance visit file, etc.) and the documentation the Part-145 approved organisation should provide to the operator upon delivery of the aircraft.<br><br>This may include, but may not be limited to:<br><br>- Certificate of release to service — mandatory,<br>- flight test report,<br>- list of modifications embodied,<br>- list of repairs,<br>- list of ADs incorporated,<br>- maintenance visit report,<br>- test bench report.<br>2.21.​Maintenance recording<br><br>The operator may contract the Part-145 approved organisation to retain some of the maintenance records required by Part-M Subpart C. It should be ensured that every requirement of Part-M Subpart C is fulfilled by either the operator or the Part-145 approved organisation. In such a case, free and quick access to the above-mentioned records should be given by the Part-145 approved organization to the operator and its competent authority (in case of two different competent authorities involved, see paragraph 2.6 ‘competent authority involvement’).<br><br>2.22.​Exchange of information<br><br>Each time exchange of information between the operator and the Part-145 approved organisation is necessary, the contract should specify what information should be provided and when (i.e. on what occasion or at what frequency), how, by whom and to whom it has to be transmitted.<br><br>2.23.​Meetings<br><br>For the competent authority to be satisfied that a good communication system exists between the operator and the Part-145 approved organisation, the terms of the maintenance contract should include the provision for a certain number of meetings to be held between both parties.<br><br>2.23.1 Contract review<br>Before the contract is applicable, it is very important for the technical personnel of both parties that are involved in the application of the contract to meet in order to be sure that every point leads to a common understanding of the duties of both parties.<br><br>2.23.2 Work scope planning meeting<br>Work scope planning meetings may be organised so that the tasks to be performed may be commonly agreed.<br><br>2.23.3 Technical meeting<br>Scheduled meetings may be organised in order to review on a regular basis technical matters such as ADs, SBs, future modifications, major defects found during maintenance check, reliability, etc.<br><br>2.23.4 Quality meeting<br>Quality meetings may be organised in order to examine matters raised by the operator’s quality surveillance and to agree upon necessary corrective actions.<br><br>2.23.5 Reliability meeting<br>When a reliability programme exists, the contract should specify the operator’s and Part-145 approved organisation’s respective involvement in that programme, including the participation in reliability meetings.

M.A.709 Documentation

  • (Har og bruger Part MG gældende maintenance data, samt et godkendt maintenance programme)<br>

  • (a) The approved continuing airworthiness management organisation shall hold and use applicable current maintenance data in accordance with point M.A.401 for the performance of continuing airworthiness tasks referred to in point M.A.708. This data may be provided by the owner or the operator, subject to an appropriate contract being established with such an owner or operator. In such case, the continuing airworthiness management organisation only needs to keep such data for the duration of the contract, except when required by point M.A.714.

  • (b) For aircraft not involved in commercial air transport, the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation may develop “baseline” and/or “generic” maintenance programmes in order to allow for the initial approval and/or the extension of the scope of an approval without having the contracts referred to in Appendix I to this Annex (Part M). These “baseline” and/or “generic” maintenance programmes however do not preclude the need to establish an adequate Aircraft Maintenance Programme in compliance with point M.A.302 in due time before exercising the privileges referred to in point M.A.711.

  • AMC M.A.709 Documentation<br><br>When using maintenance data provided by the customer, the continuing airworthiness management organisation is responsible for ensuring that this data is current. As a consequence, it should establish appropriate procedures or provisions in the contract with the customer.<br><br>The sentence “…, except when required by point M.A.714”, means, in particular, the need to keep a copy of the customer data which was used to perform continuing airworthiness activities during the contract period.<br><br>“Baseline” maintenance programme: it is a maintenance programme developed for a particular aircraft type following, where applicable, the maintenance review board (MRB) report, the type certificate holder’s maintenance planning document (MPD), the relevant chapters of the maintenance manual or any other maintenance data containing information on scheduling.<br><br>“Generic” maintenance programme: it is a maintenance programme developed to cover a group of similar types of aircraft. These programmes should be based on the same type of instructions as the baseline maintenance programme. Examples of “generic” maintenance programmes could be Cessna 100 Series (covering Cessna 150, 172, 177, etc.).<br><br>“Baseline” and “generic” maintenance programmes are not applicable to a particular aircraft registration mark, but to an aircraft type or group of types, and should be available to the competent authority prior to the initial approval and prior to the extension of the scope of an existing organisation approval. The intent is that the competent authority is aware of the scope and complexity of tasks that will be managed before granting an organisation approval or change of approval.<br><br>After this initial approval, when an owner/operator is contracted, the baseline or generic maintenance programme, as applicable, may be used to establish the M.A.302 aircraft maintenance programme, incorporating the additional maintenance tasks and indicating those which are not applicable to a particular aircraft registration mark. This may be achieved by adding an Annex to the baseline/generic maintenance programme for each aircraft registration, specifying which tasks are added and which are not applicable. This will result in an aircraft maintenance programme specific for each customer.<br><br>However, this does not mean that this adaptation must be performed for each contracted aircraft registration. The reason is that the customer may already have an approved aircraft maintenance programme, which in that case should be used by the continuing airworthiness management organisation to manage the continuing airworthiness of such aircraft.<br><br>Continuing airworthiness management organisations may seek authorisation for indirect approval in order to amend the aircraft maintenance programme mentioned above in accordance with M.A.302(c). The indirect approval procedure should include provisions to notify to the competent authority that an aircraft maintenance programme specific for a customer has been created. The reason is that, according to M.A.704(a)9, for aircraft not involved in commercial air transport the Continuing Airworthiness Management Exposition (CAME) only needs to include the reference to the baseline/generic maintenance programme.

M.A.710 Airworthiness review

  • M.A.710 Airworthiness review<br>(a) To satisfy the requirement for the airworthiness review of an aircraft referred to in point M.A.901, a full documented review of the aircraft records shall be carried out by the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation in order to be satisfied that:<br> - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>1. airframe, engine and propeller flying hours and associated flight cycles have been properly recorded; and<br>2. the flight manual is applicable to the aircraft configuration and reflects the latest revision status; and<br>3. all the maintenance due on the aircraft according to the approved maintenance programme has been carried out; and<br>4. all known defects have been corrected or, when applicable, carried forward in a controlled manner; and<br>5. all applicable airworthiness directives have been applied and properly registered; and<br>6. all modifications and repairs applied to the aircraft have been registered and are in compliance with the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003; and<br>7. all service life limited components installed on the aircraft are properly identified, registered and have not exceeded their approved service life limit; and<br>8. all maintenance has been released in accordance with Annex I (Part-M); and<br>9. the current mass and balance statement reflects the configuration of the aircraft and is valid; and<br>10. the aircraft complies with the latest revision of its type design approved by the Agency; and<br>11. if required, the aircraft holds a noise certificate corresponding to the current configuration of the aircraft in compliance with Subpart I of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003.<br>(Procedure for gennemgang af documenter og records.)

  • AMC M.A.710 (a) Airworthiness review<br>1. A full documented review is a check of at least the following categories of documents: - registration papers<br>- M.A.305 aircraft continuing airworthiness record system<br>- M.A.306 operator’s technical log system<br>- list of deferred defects, minimum equipment list and configuration deviation list if applicable - aircraft flight manual including aircraft configuration<br>- aircraft Maintenance programme<br>- maintenance Data<br>- relevant work packages<br>- AD status<br>- modification and SB status<br>- modification and repair approval sheets<br>- list of service life limited component<br>- relevant EASA Form 1 or equivalent<br>- mass and balance report and equipment list<br>- aircraft, engine and propeller TC Data Sheets<br>As a minimum, sample checks within each document category should be carried out.<br>2. The M.A. Subpart G organisation should develop procedures for the airworthiness review staff to produce a compliance report that confirms the above have been reviewed and found in compliance with Part-M.

  • (b) The airworthiness review staff of the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation shall carry out a physical survey of the aircraft. For this survey, airworthiness review staff not appropriately qualified to Annex III (Part-66) shall be assisted by such qualified personnel. - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>(Godkendt review staff?)

  • (c) Through the physical survey of the aircraft, the airworthiness review staff shall ensure that: - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>1. all required markings and placards are properly installed; and<br>2. the aircraft complies with its approved flight manual; and<br>3. the aircraft configuration complies with the approved documentation; and<br>4. no evident defect can be found that has not been addressed according to point M.A.403; and<br>5. no inconsistencies can be found between the aircraft and the paragraph (a) documented review of records.<br>(Procedure for fysisk inspection af luftfartøj)

  • AMC M.A.710 (b) and (c) Airworthiness review<br>1. The physical survey could require actions categorised as maintenance (e.g. operational tests, tests of emergency equipment, visual inspections requiring panel opening etc.). In this case, after the airworthiness review a release to service should be issued in accordance with Part-M. When the airworthiness review staff are not appropriately qualified to Part-66 in order to release such maintenance, M.A.710(b) requires them to be assisted by such qualified personnel. However, the function of such Part-66 personnel is limited to perform and release the maintenance actions requested by the airworthiness review staff, it not being their function to perform the physical survey of the aircraft. As stated in M.A.710(b), the airworthiness review staff shall carry out the physical survey of the aircraft, and this survey includes the verification that no inconsistencies can be found between the aircraft and the documented review of records.<br>This means that the airworthiness review staff who are going to sign the airworthiness review certificate or the recommendation should be the one performing both the documented review and the physical survey of the aircraft, it not being the intent of the rule to delegate the survey to Part-66 personnel who are not airworthiness review staff. Furthermore, the provision of M.A.710(d) allowing a 90 days anticipation for the physical survey provides enough flexibility to ensure that the airworthiness review staff are present.<br>2. The physical survey may include verifications to be carried out during flight.<br>3. The M.A. Subpart G organisation should develop procedures for the airworthiness review staff to produce a compliance report that confirms<br>the physical survey has been carried out and found satisfactory.<br>4. To ensure compliance the physical survey may include relevant sample checks of items

  • (d) By derogation to point M.A.901(a), the airworthiness review can be anticipated by a maximum period of 90 days without loss of continuity of the airworthiness review pattern, to allow the physical review to take place during a maintenance check. - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>(Besigtigelse og udløbsdatoér kan fremskønnes med op til 90 dage)

  • AMC M.A.710(d) Airworthiness review<br>“Without loss of continuity of the airworthiness review pattern” means that the new expiration date is set up one year after the previous expiration date. As a consequence, when the airworthiness review is anticipated, the validity or the airworthiness review certificate is longer than one year (up to 90 days longer).<br>This anticipation of up to 90 days also applies to the 12 month requirements shown in M.A.901(b), which means that the aircraft is still considered as being in a controlled environment if it has been continuously managed by a single organisation and maintained by appropriately approved organisations, as stated in M.A.901(b), from the date when the last airworthiness review certificate was issued until the date when the new airworthiness review is performed (this can be up to 90 days less than 12 months).

  • (e) The airworthiness review certificate (EASA Form 15b) or the recommendation for the issue of the airworthiness review certificate (EASA Form 15a) referred to in Appendix III to Annex I (Part-M) can only be issued: - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>1. by airworthiness review staff appropriately authorised in accordance with point M.A.707 on behalf of the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation or by certifying staff in cases provided for in point M.A.901(g); and<br>2. when satisfied that the airworthiness review has been completely carried out and that there is no noncompliance which is known to endanger flight safety.<br>(EASA Form 15a eller 15b)

  • AMC M.A.710 (e) Airworthiness review<br>A copy of both physical survey and document review compliance reports stated above should be sent to the competent authority together with any recommendation issued.

  • (f) A copy of any airworthiness review certificate issued or extended for an aircraft shall be sent to the Member State of Registry of that aircraft within 10 days. - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>(Kopi til TS eller NAA)

  • (g) Airworthiness review tasks shall not be sub-contracted.<br>- (CAME Part 4.2)<br>(Airworthiness task må ikke udliciteres)

  • (h) Should the outcome of the airworthiness review be inconclusive, the competent authority shall be informed as soon as practicable but in any case within 72 hours of the organisation identifying the condition to which the review relates. - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>(Procedure for rapportering til SLV af non-compliances)

M.A.711 Privileges of the organisation

  • (a) A continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M) may:<br>1. manage the continuing airworthiness of aircraft, except those<br>involved in commercial air transport, as listed on the approval<br>certificate.;<br>(Sikre Part MG vedvarende luftdygtighed på private fly, som er på godkendelsen EASA Form 14)<br>2. manage the continuing airworthiness of commercial air transport aircraft when listed both on its approval certificate and on its Air Operator Certificate (AOC);<br>(Sikre Part MG vedvarende luftdygtighed på erhvervs fly, som er på godkendelsen EASA Form 14)<br>3. arrange to carry out limited continuing airworthiness tasks with any contracted organisation, working under its quality system, as listed on the approval certificate; - (CAME Part 5.3)<br>(Er der andre virksomheder, Part MG udliciterer vedvarende luftdygtigheds task’s til(Subcontractors) på Form 14, skal det indgå i auditplanen)<br>4. extend, under the conditions of point M.A.901(f), an airworthiness review certificate that has been issued by the competent authority or by another continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M); - (CAME Part 4.2)<br>(Procedure for forlængelse af Airworthiness review certificate, udstedt af TS, en anden NAA eller en anden godkendt CAMO)

  • (b) An approved continuing airworthiness management organisation registered in one of the Member States may, additionally, be approved to carry out airworthiness reviews referred to in point M.A.710 and:<br>1. issue the related airworthiness review certificate and extend it in due time under the conditions of points M.A.901(c)2 or M.A.901(e)2; and,<br>(Har organisationen en godkendt procedure for udstedelse og fornyelse af ARC – ”Subpart I” rettigheder)<br>2. issue a recommendation for the airworthiness review to the competent authority of the Member State of registry.<br>(Har organisationen en godkendt procedure for at udstede review recommendation til TS ellen NAA – ”Subpart I” rettigheder)

  • AMC M.A.711 (b) Privileges of the organisation<br>An organisation may be approved for the privileges of M.A.711(a) only, without the privilege to carry out airworthiness reviews. This can be contracted to another appropriately approved organisation. In such a case, it is not mandatory that the contracted organisation is linked to an AOC holder, being possible to contract an appropriately approved independent continuing airworthiness management organisation which is approved for the same aircraft type<br>In order to be approved for the privileges of M.A.711(b) for a particular aircraft type, it is necessary to be approved for the privileges of M.A.711(a) for that aircraft type. As a consequence, the normal situation in this case is that the organisation will be performing continuing airworthiness management tasks and performing airworthiness reviews on every aircraft type contained in the approval certificate.<br>Nevertheless, this does not necessarily mean that the organisation needs to be currently managing an aircraft type in order to be able to perform airworthiness reviews on that aircraft type. The organisation may be performing only airworthiness reviews on an aircraft type without having any customer under contract for that type.<br>Furthermore, this situation should not necessarily lead to the removal of the aircraft type from the organisation approval. As a matter of fact, since in most cases the airworthiness review staff are not involved in continuing airworthiness management activities, it cannot be argued that these airworthiness review staff are going to lose their skills just because the organisation is not managing a particular aircraft type. The important issue in relation to maintaining a particular aircraft type in the organisation approval is whether the organisation continuously fulfils all the Subpart G requirements (facilities, documentation, qualified personnel, quality system, etc.) required for initial approval.

  • (c) A continuing airworthiness management organisation whose approval<br>includes the privileges referred to in point M.A.711(b) may additionally be approved to issue a permit to fly in accordance with Part 21A.711(d) of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 for the particular aircraft for which the organisation is approved to issue the airworthiness review certificate, when the continuing airworthiness management organisation is attesting conformity with approved flight conditions, subject to an adequate approved procedure in the exposition referred to in point M.A.704.<br>(Har organisationen en godkendt procedure for udstedelse af Permit to Fly i h.t.Part 21A.711(d))

  • AMC M.A.711 (c) Privileges of the organisation<br>The sentence ‘for the particular aircraft for which the organisation is approved to issue the airworthiness review certificate’ contained in M.A.711(c) means that:<br> For aircraft used in commercial air transport, and aircraft above 2730 kg MTOM, except balloons, the permit to fly can only be issued for aircraft<br>which are in a controlled environment and are managed by that M.A. Subpart G organisation.<br> For aircraft not involved in commercial air transport of 2730 kg MTOM and below, and for all balloons, the permit to fly can be issued for any<br>aircraft.

M.A.712 Quality system - (CAME Part 2.0, 2.1.2, 3.1)

  • (a) To ensure that the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation continues to meet the requirements of this Subpart, it shall establish a quality system and designate a quality manager to monitor compliance with, and the adequacy of, procedures required to ensure airworthy aircraft. Compliance monitoring shall include a feedback system to the accountable manager to ensure corrective action as necessary. - (CAME Part 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.6)<br>(Er der et kvalitetssystem? Er der en QM? Er der et feedback system til Acc. Mgr?)

  • AMC M.A.712 (a) Quality system - (CAME Part 2.0)<br>1. Procedures should be held current such that they reflect best practice within the organisation. It is the responsibility of all employees to report any difficulties with the procedures via their organisation’s internal occurrence reporting mechanisms.<br>2. All procedures, and changes to the procedures, should be verified and validated before use where practicable.<br>3. The feedback part of the system should address who is required to rectify any non-compliance in each particular case and the procedure to<br>be followed if rectification is not completed within appropriate timescales. The procedure should lead to the accountable manager specified in M.A.706.<br>4. The independent quality audit reports referenced in AMC M.A.712 (b) should be sent to the relevant department for rectification action giving target rectification dates. Rectification dates should be discussed with such department before the quality department or nominated quality auditor confirms such dates in the report. The relevant department is required to rectify findings and inform the quality manager or the quality auditor of such rectification.<br>5. The accountable manager should hold regular meetings with staff to check progress on rectification except that in the large organisations such meetings may be delegated on a day to day basis to the quality manager subject to the accountable manager meeting at least twice per year with the senior staff involved to review the overall performance and receiving at least a half yearly summary report on findings of non-compliance.

  • (b) The quality system shall monitor M.A. Subpart G activities. It shall at least include the following functions: - (CAME Part 0.6) (Overvåger kvalitetssystemet Part MG?)<br>1. monitoring that all M.A. Subpart G activities are being performed in accordance with the approved procedures, and;<br>- (CAME Part 2.2, 2.3)<br>(Overvåger kvalitetssystemet at Part MG aktiviteter udføres i h.t. gældende procedure?)<br>2. monitoring that all contracted maintenance is carried out in accordance with the contract, and; - (CAME Part 2.5, 3.2)<br>(Overvåger kvalitetssystemet at kontraktarbejde udføres i h.t. kontrakten?)<br>3. monitoring the continued compliance with the requirements of this Part. - (CAME Part 3.2)<br>(Overvåger kvalitetssystemet løbende Part MG, med auditer og audit rapporter? Er der terminer?)

  • AMC M.A.712 (b) Quality System<br>1. The primary objectives of the quality system are to enable the M.A. Subpart G organisation to ensure airworthy aircraft and to remain in compliance with the Part-M requirements.<br>2. An essential element of the quality system is the independent audit.<br>3. The independent audit is an objective process of routine sample checks of all aspects of the M.A. Subpart G organisation’s ability to carry<br>out continuing airworthiness management to the required standards. It includes some product sampling as this is the end result of the process.<br>4. The independent audit represents an objective overview of the complete continuing airworthiness management related activities. It is intended to complement the M.A.902 requirement for an airworthiness review to be satisfied that all aircraft managed by the organisation remain airworthy.<br>The independent audit should ensure that all aspects of M.A. Subpart G compliance are checked annually, including all the sub-contracted activities, and may be carried out as a complete single exercise or subdivided over the annual period in accordance with a scheduled plan. The independent audit does not require each procedure to be checked against each product line when it can be shown that the particular procedure is common to more than one product line and the procedure has been checked every year without resultant findings. Where findings have been identified, the particular procedure should be rechecked against other product lines until the findings have been rectified after which the independent audit procedure may revert back to annual interval for the particular procedure.<br>5. Provided that there are no safety related findings, the audit time periods specified in this AMC may be increased by up to 100% subject to agreement by the competent authority. - (CAME Part 2.1.4)<br>6. Where the organisation has more than one location approved the quality system should describe how these are integrated into the system and include a plan to audit each location every year.<br>7. A report should be raised each time an audit is carried out describing what was checked and the resulting findings against applicable requirements, procedures and products.<br>8. The independence of the audit should be established by always ensuring that audits are carried out by personnel not responsible for the function, procedure or products being checked.<br>9. An organisation should establish a quality plan acceptable to the competent authority of approval to show when and how often the activities as required by M.A. Subpart G will be audited.

  • (c) The records of these activities shall be stored for at least two years. <br>(Bliver audit rapporterne gemt i to år?)

  • (d) Where the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation is approved in accordance with another Part, the quality system may be combined with that required by the other Part.<br>(Er Part MG kvalitetssystemet kombineret med et andet kvalitetssystem?)

  • (e) In case of commercial air transport the M.A. Subpart G quality system shall be an integrated part of the operator's quality system.<br>(Er part MG kvalitetssystemet en integreret del af luftfartsvirksomhedens kvalitetssystem?)

  • (f) In the case of a small organisation not managing the continuing airworthiness of aircraft used in commercial air transport, the quality system may be replaced by regular organisational reviews subject to the approval of the competent authority, except when the organisation issues airworthiness review certificates for aircraft above 2 730 kg MTOM other than balloons. In the case where there is no quality system, the organisation shall not contract continuing airworthiness management tasks to other parties<br>(Hvis ikke M.A.711(b), er der da regelmæssige auditer (organisational review) af Part MG?)

  • AMC M.A.712 (f) Quality system (Note: Appendix AMC XIII)<br>A small organisation is considered to be an organisation with up to 5 full-time staff (including all M.A.706 personnel) or equivalent proportional number when using part-time staff. The complexity of the organisation, combination of aircraft and aircraft types, the utilisation of the aircraft and the number of approved locations of the organisation should also be considered before replacing the quality system by an organisational review.<br>Appendix AMC XIII should be used to manage the organisational reviews.<br>The following activities should not be considered as subcontracting and, as a consequence, they may be performed without a Quality System, although they need to be described in the continuing airworthiness management exposition and be approved by the competent authority:<br> Subscription to a technical publisher that provides maintenance data (Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, Illustrated Parts Catalogues, Service Bulletins, etc.), which may be applicable to a wide range of aircraft. These data may include maintenance schedules recommended by different manufacturers that can be afterwards used by the continuing airworthiness management organisation in order to produce customised maintenance programmes.<br> Contracting the use of a software tool for the management of continuing airworthiness data and records, under the following conditions (in addition to M.A.714(d) and (e)):<br>o If the tool is used by several organisations, each organisation should have access to its own data only.<br>o Introduction of data can only be performed by personnel of the continuing airworthiness management organisation. o The data can be retrieved at any time.

  • Appendix AMC XIII to AMC M.A.712(f)<br>Organisational reviews may replace a full quality system in accordance with the provisions of M.A.712(f) and AMC M.A.712(f) and as described in the continuing airworthiness management exposition (CAME)<br>Depending on the complexity of the small organisation (number and type of aircraft, number of different fleets, privilege to perform airworthiness reviews, etc.), the organisational review system may vary from a system using the principles and practices of a quality system (except for the requirement of independence) to a simplified system adapted to the low complexity of the organisation and the aircraft managed.<br>As a core minimum, the organisational review system should have the following features, which should be described in the CAME: a. Identification of the person responsible for the organisational review programme:<br>By default, this person should be the accountable manager, unless he delegates this responsibility to (one of) the M.A.706(c) person(s). b. Identification and qualification criteria for the person(s) responsible for performing the organisational reviews:<br>These persons should have a thorough knowledge of the regulations and of the continuing airworthiness management organisation (CAMO) procedures. They should also have knowledge of audits, acquired through training or through experience (preferably as an auditor, but also possibly because they actively participated in several audits conducted by the competent authority).<br>c. Elaboration of the organisational review programme:<br>• Checklist(s) covering all items necessary to be satisfied that the organisation delivers a safe product and complies with the regulation. All<br>procedures described in the CAME should be addressed.<br>• A schedule for the accomplishment of the checklist items. Each item should be checked at least every 12 months. The organisation may<br>choose to conduct one full review annually or to conduct several partial reviews. d. Performance of organisational reviews:<br>Each checklist item should be answered using an appropriate combination of: • review of records, documentation, etc.<br>• sample check of aircraft under contract.<br>• interview of personnel involved.<br>• review of discrepancies and difficulty internal reports (e.g., notified difficulties in using current procedures and tools, systematic deviations from procedures, etc.).<br>• review of complaints filed by customers.<br>e. Management of findings and occurrence reports:<br>• All findings should be recorded and notified to the affected persons.<br>• All level 1 findings, in the sense of M.A.716(a), should be immediately notified to the competent authority and all necessary actions on aircraft<br>in service should be immediately taken.<br>• All occurrence reports should be reviewed with the aim for continuous improvement of the system by identifying possible corrective and<br>preventive actions. This should be done in order to find prior indicators (e.g., notified difficulties in using current procedures and tools, systematic deviations from procedures, unsafe behaviours, etc.), and dismissed alerts that, had they been recognised and appropriately managed before the event, could have resulted in the undesired event being prevented.<br>• Corrective and preventive actions should be approved by the person responsible for the organisational review programme and implemented within a specified time frame.<br>• Once the person responsible for the organisational review programme is satisfied that the corrective action is effective, closure of the finding should be recorded along with a summary of the corrective action.<br>• The accountable manager should be notified of all significant findings and, on a regular basis, of the global results of the organisational review programme.<br>Following is a typical example of a simplified organisational review checklist, to be adapted as necessary to cover the CAME procedures: 1 – Scope of work<br>• All aircraft under contract are covered in the Form 14.<br>• The scope of work in the CAME does not disagree with the Form 14.<br>• No work has been performed outside the scope of the Form 14 and the CAME.<br>• Is it justified to retain in the approved scope of work aircraft types for which the organisation has no longer aircraft under contract?<br>2 – Airworthiness situation of the fleet<br>• Does the continuing airworthiness status (AD, maintenance programme, life limited components, deferred maintenance, ARC validity)<br>show any expired items? If so, are the aircraft grounded? 3 – Aircraft maintenance programme<br>• Check that all revisions to the TC/STC holders Instructions for Continuing Airworthiness, since the last review, have been (or are planned to be) incorporated in the maintenance programme, unless otherwise approved by the Competent Authority.<br>• Has the maintenance programme been revised to take into account all modifications or repairs impacting the maintenance programme? • Have all maintenance programme amendments been approved at the right level (competent authority or indirect approval)?<br>• Does the status of compliance with the maintenance programme reflect the latest approved maintenance programme?<br>• Has the use of maintenance programme deviations and tolerances been properly managed and approved?<br>4 – Airworthiness Directives (and other mandatory measures issued by the competent authority)<br>• Have all ADs issued since the last review been incorporated into the AD status?<br>• Does the AD status correctly reflect the AD content: applicability, compliance date, periodicity...? (sample check on ADs)<br>5 – Modifications/repairs<br>• Are all modifications/repairs listed in the corresponding status approved in accordance with M.A.304? (sample check on<br>modifications/repairs).<br>• Have all the modifications/repairs which have been installed since the last review been incorporated in the corresponding status?<br>(sample check from the aircraft/component logbooks). 6 – Relations with the owners/operators<br>• Has a contract (in accordance with Annex I to Part M) been signed with each external owner/operator, covering all the aircraft whose airworthiness is managed by the CAMO?<br>• Have the owners/operators under contract fulfilled their obligations identified in the contract? As appropriate:<br>o Are the pre-flight checks correctly performed? (interview of pilots)<br>o Are the technical log or equivalent correctly used (record of flight hours/cycles, defects reported by the pilot, identification of<br>what maintenance is next due etc.)?<br>o Did flights occur with overdue maintenance or with defects not properly rectified or deferred? (sample check from the aircraft<br>records)<br>o Has maintenance been performed without notifying the CAMO (sample check from the aircraft records, interview of the<br>owner/operator)?<br>7 – Personnel<br>• Check that the current accountable manager and other nominated persons are correctly identified in the approved CAME.<br>• If the number of personnel has decreased or if the activity has increased, check that the organisation still has sufficient staff. • Check that the qualification of all new personnel (or personnel with new functions) has been appropriately assessed.<br>• Check that the staff has been trained, as necessary, to cover changes in:<br>o regulations,<br>o competent authority publications,<br>o the CAME and associated procedures,<br>o the approved scope of work,<br>o maintenance data (significant ADs, SBs, ICA amendments, etc.).<br>8 – Maintenance contracted<br>• Sample check of maintenance records:<br>o Existence and adequacy of the work order,<br>o Data received from the maintenance organisation:<br>Valid CRS including any deferred maintenance<br>List of removed and installed equipment and copy of the associated Form 1 or equivalent. • Obtain a copy of the current approval certificate (Form 3) of the maintenance organisations contracted.<br>9 – Technical records and record-keeping<br>• Have the certificates (Form 1 and Conformity certificates) been properly collected and recorded?<br>• Perform a sample check of technical records to ensure completeness and storage during the appropriate periods. • Is storage of computerised data properly ensured?<br>10 – Occurrence reporting procedures<br>• Check that reporting is properly performed, • Actions taken and recorded.<br>11 – Airworthiness review

M.A.713 Changes to the approved continuing airworthiness organisation - (CAME Part 0.5)

  • In order to enable the competent authority to determine continued compliance with this Part, the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation shall notify it of any proposal to carry out any of the following changes, before such changes take place:<br>1. the name of the organisation.<br>2. the location of the organisation.<br>3. additional locations of the organisation.<br>4. the accountable manager.<br>5. any of the persons specified in M.A.706(c).<br>(Har der været ændringer og er SLV underrettet?)<br>6. the facilities, procedures, work scope and staff that could affect the<br>approval.<br>(Er der ændringer der kunne påvirke godkendelsen? (Faciliteter – procedurer – arbejdsområder - personale))<br>In the case of proposed changes in personnel not known to the management beforehand, these changes shall be notified at the earliest opportunity.

  • AMC M.A.713 Changes to the approved continuing airworthiness organisation<br>1. This paragraph covers scheduled changes to the continuing airworthiness organisation’s approval. Whilst the requirements relating to air operator certificates, including their issue, variation and continued validity, are prescribed in the appropriate regulation, operators should be aware this paragraph is included in Part M and may affect continued acceptance of the continuing airworthiness management.<br>2. The primary purpose of this paragraph is to enable the continuing airworthiness organisation to remain approved if agreed by the competent authority during negotiations about any of the specified changes. Without this paragraph the approval would automatically be suspended in all cases.

M.A.714 Record-keeping - (CAME Part 1.3.2, 1.3.3)

  • (a) The continuing airworthiness management organisation shall record all details of work carried out. The records required by M.A.305 and if<br>applicable M.A.306 shall be retained. - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Alle oplysninger om udført arbejde skal gemmes (se M.A.305 + M.A.306))

  • (b) If the continuing airworthiness management organisation has the privilege referred to in point M.A.711(b), it shall retain a copy of each airworthiness review certificate and recommendation issued or, as applicable, extended, together with all supporting documents. In addition, the organisation shall retain a copy of any airworthiness review certificate that it has extended under the privilege referred to in point M.A.711(a)4. - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Hvis M.A.711(b), skal der opbevares kopi af ARC, recommendation og understøttende dokumenter)

  • (c) If the continuing airworthiness management organisation has the privilege referred to in point M.A.711(c), it shall retain a copy of each permit to fly issued in accordance with the provisions of point 21A.729 of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003.<br> - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Hvis M.A.711(c), skal der opbevares kopi af Permit to fly og understøttende dokumenter)

  • (d) The continuing airworthiness management organisation shall retain a copy of all records referred to in paragraphs (b) and (c) until two years after the aircraft has been permanently withdrawn from service. - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Hvis M.A.711(b), skal dokumenterne i (b) sikres i en ekstra periode på 2 år)

  • (e) The records shall be stored in a manner that ensures protection from damage, alteration and theft. - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Er dokumentationen sikret mod skader, forandringer og tyveri?)

  • (f) All computer hardware used to ensure backup shall be stored in a different location from that containing the working data in an environment that ensures they remain in good condition. - (CAME Part 1.3.4)<br>(Al computerbackup skal gemmes andet sted end computeren)

  • (g) Where continuing airworthiness management of an aircraft is transferred to another organisation or person, all retained records shall be transferred to the said organisation or person. The time periods prescribed for the retention of records shall continue to apply to the said organisation or person. - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Er der overført documentation fra en Part MG til en anden Part MG?)

  • (h) Where a continuing airworthiness management organisation terminates its operation, all retained records shall be transferred to the owner of the aircraft. - (CAME Part 4.8)<br>(Hvis Part MG lukker, skal dokumentationen overføres til flyets ejer)

  • AMC M.A.714 Record-keeping<br>1. The M.A. Subpart G organisation should ensure that it always receives a complete CRS from the approved maintenance organisation, M.A.801(b)(2) certifying staff and/or from the Pilot-owner such that the required records can be retained. The system to keep the continuing airworthiness records should be described in the organisation continuing airworthiness management exposition.<br>2. When an organisation arranges for the relevant maintenance organisation to retain copies of the continuing airworthiness records on its behalf, it will nevertheless continue to be responsible for the records under M.A.714 relating to the preservation of records. If it ceases to be the organisation of the aircraft, it also remains responsible for transferring the records to any other person or organisation managing continuing airworthiness of the aircraft.<br>3. Keeping continuing airworthiness records in a form acceptable to the competent authority means in paper form or on a computer database or a combination of both methods. Records stored in microfilm or optical disc form are also acceptable. The record should remain legible throughout the required retention period.<br>4. Paper systems should use robust material which can withstand normal handling and filing.<br>5. Computer systems should have at least one backup system which should be updated within 24 hours of any new entry. Each terminal is<br>required to contain programme safeguards against the ability of unauthorised personnel to alter the database.<br>6. Microfilming or optical storage of continuing airworthiness records may be carried out at any time. The records should be as legible as the original record and remain so for the required retention period.

M.A.715 Continued validity of approval - (CAME Part 1.3.4)

  • (a) An approval shall be issued for an unlimited duration. It shall remain<br>valid subject to:<br>1. the organisation remaining in compliance with this Part, in accordance with the provisions related to the handling of findings as specified under M.B.705 and;<br>(Part MG skal overholde bestemmelserne + håndtering af findings)<br>2. the competent authority being granted access to the organisation to determine continued compliance with this Part, and;<br>(TS og NAA skal have adgang til Part MG org.)<br>3. the approval not being surrendered or revoked.<br>(Godkendelsesbeviset må ikke være overdraget eller tilbagekaldt)

  • (b) Upon surrender or revocation, the approval certificate shall be returned to the competent authority.<br>(Er beviset indsendt til TS i tilfælde af inddragelse)

M.A.716 Findings

  • (a) A level 1 finding is any significant non-compliance with Part-M requirements which lowers the safety standard and hazards seriously the flight safety.<br>(Level 1 er = bringer flyvesikkerheden i alvorlig fare)

  • (b) A level 2 finding is any non-compliance with the Part-M requirements which could lower the safety standard and possibly hazard the flight safety.<br>(Level 2 er = bringer muligvis flyvesikkerheden i fare)

  • (c) After receipt of notification of findings according to M.B.705, the holder of the continuing airworthiness management organisation approval shall define a corrective action plan and demonstrate corrective action to the satisfaction of the competent authority within a period agreed with this authority.<br>(Er der udarbejdet en tilfredsstillende plan for afhjælpning af findings)

SUBPART I - AIRWORTHINESS REVIEW CERTIFICATE

M.A.901 Aircraft airworthiness review - (CAME Part 4.2)

  • To ensure the validity of the aircraft airworthiness certificate an airworthiness review of the aircraft and its continuing airworthiness records shall be carried out periodically.

  • AMC M.A.901 Aircraft airworthiness review<br>n order to ensure the validity of the aircraft airworthiness certificate, M.A.901 requires performing periodically an airworthiness review of the aircraft and its continuing airworthiness records, which results in the issuance of an airworthiness review certificate valid for one year.<br>Any airworthiness review certificate or equivalent document issued in accordance with the Member State requirements and valid on the date of entry into force of Part-M, Subpart I, is considered to attest the validity of the aircraft airworthiness certificate until its expiration or until one year after the entry into force of Part-M, Subpart I, whichever comes first. As a consequence, it is not necessarily required for the competent authority to re-issue all national airworthiness review certificates on the date of entry into force of Part-M, Subpart-I, being possible to wait until the limit mentioned above. However, when transferring the registration of the aircraft within the EU, this national airworthiness review certificate may not be recognised by the importing authority, and a new airworthiness review certificate may need to be issued in accordance with M.A.904.

  • (a) An airworthiness review certificate is issued in accordance with<br>Appendix III (EASA Form 15a or 15b) on completion of a satisfactory airworthiness review. The airworthiness review certificate is valid one year;<br>(Er der procedure til sikring af gyldige ARC?)

  • AMC M.A.901 (a) Aircraft airworthiness review<br>EASA Form 15a is issued by competent authorities while EASA Form 15b is issued by a M.A. Subpart G organisation.

  • (b) An aircraft in a controlled environment is an aircraft<br>(i) continuously managed during the previous 12 months by a unique continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G, of this Annex (Part M), and<br>(ii) which has been maintained for the previous 12 months by maintenance organisations approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M), or with Annex II (Part 145). This includes maintenance tasks referred to in point M.A.803(b) carried out and released to service in accordance with point M.A.801(b)2 or point M.A.801(b)3;<br>(Har flyet været i kontrolleret miljø, de sidste 12 måneder +/- 1 måned + vedligeholdt af P-F eller P-145)

  • AMC M.A.901 (b) Aircraft airworthiness review<br>1. If the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft is not managed according to a Part-M appendix I arrangement between the owner and the M.A. Subpart G organisation, the aircraft should be considered to be outside a controlled environment. Nevertheless, such arrangement is not necessary when the operator and the M.A. Subpart G organisation are the same organisation.<br>2. The fact that limited Pilot-owner maintenance as defined in M.A.803 (b) is not carried out and released by an approved maintenance organisation does not change the status of an aircraft in a controlled environment providing the M.A. Subpart G organisation under contract has been informed of any such maintenance carried out.

  • (c) For all aircraft used in commercial air transport, and aircraft above<br>2730 kg MTOM, except balloons, that are in a controlled environment, the organisation referred to in (b) managing the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft may, if appropriately approved, and subject to compliance with paragraph (k): - (CAME Part 4.7)<br>1. issue an airworthiness review certificate in accordance with point M.A.710, and;<br>2. for the airworthiness review certificates it has issued, when the aircraft has remained within a controlled environment, extend twice the validity of the airworthiness review certificate for a period of one year each time;<br>(Har Part MG/I godkendte procedurer til udstedelse + forlængelse af Form 15b på fly over 2750kg på AOC)

  • AMC M.A.901(c)2, (e)2 and (f) Aircraft airworthiness review<br>When the aircraft has remained within a controlled environment, the extension of the validity of the airworthiness review certificate does not require an airworthiness review but only a verification of the continuous compliance with M.A.901 (b).<br>It is acceptable to anticipate the extension of the airworthiness review certificate by a maximum of 30 days without a loss of continuity of the airworthiness review pattern, which means that the new expiration date is set up one year after the previous expiration date. This anticipation of up to 30 days also applies to the 12 month requirements shown in M.A.901(b), meaning that the aircraft is still considered as being in a controlled environment if it has been continuously managed by a single organisation and maintained by appropriately approved organisations, as stated in M.A.901(b), from the date when the last airworthiness review certificate was issued until the date when the extension is performed (this can be up to 30 days less than 12 months).<br>It is also acceptable to perform the extension of an airworthiness review certificate after its expiration date, as long as all the conditions for the extension are met. However, this means the following:<br> The aircraft could not fly since the airworthiness review certificate expired until it is extended, and<br> The new expiration date (after extension) is set one year after the previous expiration date (not one year after the extension is performed).

  • (d) For all aircraft used in commercial air transport and aircraft above 2730<br>kg MTOM, except balloons, that - (CAME Part 4.6)<br>(i) are not in a controlled environment, or<br>(ii) which continuing airworthiness is managed by a continuing<br>airworthiness management organisation that does not hold the privilege to carry out airworthiness reviews, the airworthiness review certificate shall be issued by the competent authority upon satisfactory assessment based on a recommendation made by a continuing airworthiness management organisation appropriately approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M) sent together with the application from the owner or operator. This recommendation shall be based on an airworthiness review carried out in accordance with point M.A.710;<br>(Har Part MG/I godkendte procedurer til recommendation af SLV/NAA udstedelse af Form 15a på fly over 2750kg på AOC)

  • AMC M.A.901 (d) & (g) Aircraft airworthiness review<br>The recommendation sent by a continuing airworthiness management organisation (CAMO) or by M.A.901(g) certifying staff to the competent authority of the Member State of registry should be, at least, in English when the Member State of registry is different from the CAMO’s Member State. Otherwise it can be completed in the official language(s) of the CAMO’s Member State.<br>The recommendation sent to the competent authority should contain at least the items described below.<br>(a) General information<br>- M.A. Subpart G organisation information<br>- owner/lessee information<br>- date and place the document review and the aircraft survey were carried out<br>- period and place the aircraft can be seen if required by the competent authority<br>(b) Aircraft information<br>- registration<br>- type<br>- manufacturer<br>- serial number<br>- flight manual reference<br>- weight and centre of gravity data<br>- maintenance programme reference<br>(c) Documents accompanying the recommendation<br>- copy of registration papers<br>- copy of the owners request for a new airworthiness review certificate<br>(d) Aircraft status<br>- aircraft total time and cycles<br>- list of persons or organisations having carried out continuing airworthiness activities including maintenance tasks on the aircraft and its components since the last airworthiness review certificate<br>(e) Aircraft survey<br>- a precise list of the areas of the aircraft that were surveyed and their status<br>(f) Findings<br>- a list of all the findings made during the airworthiness review with the corrective action carried out<br>(g) Statement<br> <br>A statement signed by the airworthiness review staff recommending the issue of an airworthiness review certificate.<br>The statement should confirm that the aircraft in its current configuration complies with the following:<br>- airworthiness directives up to the latest published issue, and;<br>- type certificate datasheet, and;<br>- maintenance programme, and;<br>- component service life limitations, and;<br>- the valid weight and centre of gravity schedule reflecting the current configuration of the aircraft, and;<br>- Part 21 for all modifications and repairs, and;<br>- the current flight manual including supplements, and;<br>- operational requirements.<br>The above items should clearly state the exact reference of the data used in establishing compliance; for instance the number and issue of the type certificate data sheet used should be stated.<br>The statement should also confirm that all of the above is properly entered and certified in the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system and/or in the operator’s technical log.

  • (e) For aircraft not used in commercial air transport of 2730 kg MTOM and<br>below, and balloons, any continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M) and appointed by the owner or operator may, if appropriately approved and subject to paragraph (k):<br>1. issue the airworthiness review certificate in accordance with point M.A.710, and;<br>2. for airworthiness review certificates it has issued, when the aircraft has remained within a controlled environment under its management, extend twice the validity of the airworthiness review certificate for a period of one year each time;<br>(Har Part MG/I godkendte procedurer til udstedelse + forlængelse af Form 15b på fly over 2750kg IKKE på AOC)

  • (f) By derogation from points M.A.901(c)2 and M.A.901(e)2, for aircraft that are in a controlled environment, the organisation referred to in (b) managing the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft, subject to compliance with paragraph (k), may extend twice for a period of one year each time the validity of an airworthiness review certificate that has been issued by the competent authority or by another continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M);<br>(Har Part MG/I godkendte procedurer til forlængelse af Form 15a/b på fly over 2750kg på AOC)

  • (g) By derogation from points M.A.901(e) and M.A.901(i)2, for ELA1<br>aircraft not used in commercial air transport and not affected by point M.A.201(i), the airworthiness review certificate may also be issued by the competent authority upon satisfactory assessment, based on a recommendation made by certifying staff formally approved by the competent authority and complying with provisions of Annex III (Part- 66) as well as requirements laid down in point M.A.707(a)2(a), sent together with the application from the owner or operator. This recommendation shall be based on an airworthiness review carried out in accordance with point M.A.710 and shall not be issued for more than two consecutive years;<br>(Har Part MG/I godkendte procedurer til recomendation af TS/NAA udstedelse af ARC på ELA1 fly IKKE på AOC eller anden erhvervsmæssig)

  • AMC M.A.901(g) Aircraft airworthiness review<br>The words “certifying staff” mean that the personnel meet at the time of the airworthiness review all the Part-66 requirements to be certifying staff for the aircraft subject to review (including also continuing experience requirements), which in some cases may refer to national rules.<br>The formal acceptance of the certifying staff by the competent authority should only be granted after verification of the qualifications and after the satisfactory performance of an airworthiness review under supervision of the competent authority.<br>The sentence “shall not be issued for more than two consecutive years” means that every three years the airworthiness review has to be performed by the competent authority or by an appropriately approved M.A. Subpart G organisation.

  • (h) Whenever circumstances reveal the existence of a potential safety threat, the competent authority shall carry out the airworthiness review and issue the airworthiness review certificate itself;<br>(Er det klart beskrevet hvornår TS/NAA skal lave Review)

  • (i) In addition to paragraph (h), the competent authority may also carry out the airworthiness review and issue the airworthiness review certificate itself in the following cases:<br>1. when the aircraft is managed by a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section<br>A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M) located in a third country,<br>2. for all balloons and any other aircraft of 2730 kg MTOM and below, if it is requested by the owner;<br>(TS/NAA må lave review samt udstede ARC når Part MG er i tredje land + balloner + når ejeren anmoder)

  • (j) When the competent authority carries out the airworthiness review and/or issues the airworthiness review certificate itself, the owner or operator shall provide the competent authority with:<br>1. the documentation required by the competent authority; and<br>2. suitable accommodation at the appropriate location for its personnel; and<br>3. when necessary, the support of personnel appropriately qualified<br>in accordance with Annex III (Part-66) or equivalent personnel requirements laid down in point 145.A.30(j)(1) and (2) of Annex II (Part 145);<br>(Er der procedure for håndtering af et evt. ønske om at SLV udføre review + evt ARC)

  • AMC M.A.901 (j) Aircraft airworthiness review<br>Suitable accommodation should include:<br>a) an office with normal office equipment such as desks, telephones, photocopying machines etc. whereby the continuing airworthiness records can be reviewed.<br>b) a hangar when needed for the physical survey.<br>The support of personnel appropriately qualified in accordance with Part-66 is necessary when the competent authority’s airworthiness review staff is not appropriately qualified.

  • (k) An airworthiness review certificate cannot be issued nor extended if there is evidence or reason to believe that the aircraft is not airworthy.

M.A.902 Validity of the airworthiness review certificate - (CAME Part 4.2)

  • (a) An airworthiness review certificate becomes invalid if:<br>1. suspended or revoked; or<br>(ARC er ugyldigt hvis det er inddraget eller tilbagekaldt)<br>2. the airworthiness certificate is suspended or revoked; or<br>(ARC er ugyldigt hvis LDB er inddraget eller tilbagekaldt)<br>3. the aircraft is not on the aircraft register of a Member State; or<br>(ARC er ugyldigt for statsløse luftfartøjer)<br>4. the type certificate under which the airworthiness certificate was issued is suspended or revoked.<br>(ARC er ugyldigt hvis type certificate er inddraget eller tilbagekaldt)

  • (b) An aircraft must not fly if the airworthiness certificate is invalid or if:<br>(Et luftfartøj må ikke flyve med ugyldigt LDB, eller)<br>1. the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft or any component fitted to the aircraft does not meet the requirements of this Part; or<br>(ikke er vedligeholdt og styret i overensstemmelse med Part-M, eller)<br>2. the aircraft does not remain in conformity with the type design approved by the Agency; or<br>(Ikke er overensstemmelse med sit typecertificaye, eller)<br>3. the aircraft has been operated beyond the limitations of the approved flight manual or the airworthiness certificate, without appropriate action being taken; or<br>(Er opereret udenfor godkendte begrænsninger, eller)<br>4. the aircraft has been involved in an accident or incident that affects the airworthiness of the aircraft, without subsequent appropriate action to restore airworthiness; or<br>5. a modification or repair is not in compliance with the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003.<br>(Hvis modifikationer eller reparation ikke er i overensstemmelse med P-21)

  • (c) Upon surrender or revocation, the airworthiness review certificate shall be returned to the competent authority<br>(Ved overdragelse og tilbagekaldelse skal ARC returneres til TS/NAA)

M.A.903 Transfer of aircraft registration within the EU.

  • (a) When transferring an aircraft registration within the EU, the applicant shall: - (CAME Part 4.5)<br>1. inform the former Member State in which Member State it will be registered, then; (Oplysningspligt til exportland)<br>2. apply to the new Member State for the issuance of a new airworthiness certificate in accordance with Part 21.<br>(Procedurer for ansøgning om udstedelse af LDB)

  • AMC M.A.903 (a) - 1 Transfer of aircraft registration within the EU<br>The applicant should notify to the competent authority within the former Member State of registry so as to allow the proper transfer of information between the two competent authorities during the aircraft transfer process. The transfer of information should include, if applicable, notification that the airworthiness review certificate of the aircraft being transferred was issued in accordance with Member State requirements as allowed by (EC) 2042/2003, Article 3.4.

  • (b) Notwithstanding M.A.902(a)(3), the former airworthiness review<br>certificate shall remain valid until its expiry date. - (CAME Part 4.5) (System for styring af udløbsdato for tidligere / nuværende ARC)

  • AMC M.A.903 (b) Transfer of aircraft registration within the EU<br>In case of transfer of aircraft registration within EU, the aircraft owner/ operator should verify that the competent authority of the new Member State of registry has entered the new aircraft registration on the existing airworthiness review certificate and validated the change.

M.A.904 Airworthiness review of aircraft imported into the EU

  • <br>(a) When importing an aircraft onto a Member State register from a third country, the applicant shall: - (CAME Part 4.5)<br>1. apply to the Member State of registry for the issuance of a new airworthiness certificate in accordance with the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003; and<br>(Procedurer for ansøgning om udstedelse af LDB)<br>2. for aircraft other than new, have a airworthiness review carried out satisfactorily in accordance with point M.A.901; and<br>(Procedurer for udførelse af Full Review på ikke nye fly)<br>3. have all maintenance carried out to comply with the approved maintenance programme in accordance with point M.A.302.<br>(Skal have alt vedligeholdelse udført for at opfylde efterleve det godkendte AMP)

  • AMC M.A.904 (a)-1 Airworthiness reviews of aircraft imported into the EU<br>In order to allow for possible participation of authority personnel, the applicant should inform the competent authority at least 10 working days in advance of the time and location of the airworthiness review.

  • AMC M.A.904 (a)-2 Airworthiness reviews of aircraft imported into the EU<br>1.​When performing an airworthiness review of aircraft imported into the EU the aircraft and the relevant records should be reviewed to determine the work to be undertaken to establish the airworthiness of the aircraft.<br>2.​In determining the work to be undertaken during the airworthiness review on the aircraft, the following should be taken into consideration:<br>a - the information from third country authorities such as export certificates, primary authority information;<br>b - the information on aircraft maintenance history such as continuing airworthiness records, aircraft, engine, propeller, rotor and life limited part log books or cards as appropriate, tech log / flight log / cabin log, list of deferred defects, total flight times and cycles, times and cycles since last maintenance, accident history, former maintenance schedule, former AD compliance status;<br>c - the information on aircraft such as aircraft, engine and propeller type certificate datasheets, noise and emission certificate data sheets, flight manual and supplements;<br>d - the aircraft continuing airworthiness status such as the aircraft and component AD status, the SB status, the maintenance status, the status of all service life limited components, weight and centre of gravity schedule including equipment list;<br>e - the modification and repair status of the aircraft detailing elements such as owner/operator designed modifications and repairs, STCs, and parts needing European parts approval (EPA); and,<br>f - the aircraft cabin configuration such as emergency equipment fitted, cockpit configuration, placards, instrument limitations, cabin layout;<br>g - the maintenance needed for import, such as embodiment of modifications needed to comply with the EASA type certificate, bridging check to comply with the new maintenance programme;<br>h - the avionics such as, but not limited to, radio and navigation equipment, instrument flight rules (IFR) equipment, digital flight data recorder (DFDR) / cockpit voice recorder (CVR) test, ELT 406 MHz code and identification;<br>i - the compass compensation;<br>j - special operating rules such as extended twin-engine operations (ETOPS)/ long range operations (LROPS), reduced vertical separation minima (RVSM), MNPS, all weather operations (AWOPS), RNAV;<br>k - the aircraft survey including verification of conformity with the flight manual and the datasheet, presence of fire proof identification plates, conformity of markings including registration, presence and serviceability of emergency equipment, internal and external lighting systems, and<br>l - check flight including check of control system / cockpit ground check / engine run up.<br>3.​If there is no M.A. Subpart G organisation approved for the specific aircraft type available, the competent authority may carry out the airworthiness review in accordance with this paragraph and the provisions M.A.901 (h) and M.B.902. In this case, the airworthiness review should be requested to the competent authority with a 30-day notice.<br>

  • (b) When satisfied that the aircraft is in compliance with the relevant requirements, the continuing airworthiness management organisation, if applicable, shall send a documented recommendation for the issuance of an airworthiness review certificate to the Member State of registry. - (CAME Part 4.5)<br>(Procedurer for vurdering af krav.)

  • AMC M.A.904 (b) Airworthiness review of aircraft imported into the EU<br>The recommendation sent to the competent authority should contain at least the items described below.<br>(a) All the information set forth by AMC M.A 901(d) & (g)<br>(b) Aircraft information<br>- aircraft assigned registration<br>- state of manufacturer<br>- previous registration<br>- export certificate number<br>- TC and TC data sheet numbers<br>- noise and emissions TC and TC data sheet numbers<br>- comparison of prior maintenance programme with the proposed new maintenance programme.<br>(c) Documents accompanying the recommendation<br>- copy of the application, and;<br>- original export certificate, and;<br>- copy of the approvals of the flight manual and its supplements, and;<br>- list of ADs incorporated up to the latest published issue, and;<br>- proposed new maintenance programme, and;<br>- status of all service life limited components, and;<br>- the valid weight and centre of gravity schedule reflecting the current configuration of the aircraft, and;<br>- Part-21 approval reference for all modifications and repairs.<br>(d) Maintenance<br>- a copy of the work packages requested by the subpart G organisation including details of any bridging check to ensure all the necessary maintenance has been carried out.<br>(e) Aircraft check flight<br>- a copy of the check flight report

M.A.905 Findings

  • (a) A level 1 finding is any significant non-compliance with Part-M requirements which lowers the safety standard and hazards seriously the flight safety. - (CAME Part 4.4)<br>(Håndtering af Level 1 findings fundet under review: Før flyvning)

  • (b) A level 2 finding is any non-compliance with the Part-M requirements which could lower the safety standard and possibly hazard the flight safety. - (CAME Part 4.4)<br>(Håndtering af Level 2 findings fundet under review: ASAP (Dog max 60 dage))

  • (c) After receipt of notification of findings according to point M.B.903, the person or organisation accountable referred to in point M.A.201 shall define a corrective action plan and demonstrate corrective action to the satisfaction of the competent authority within a period agreed with this authority including appropriate corrective action to prevent reoccurrence of the finding and its root cause. - (CAME Part 4.4)<br>(Findings fundet under TS/NAA ACAM inspectioner (Typisk systemfejl))

Background documentation: Appendix I Continuing Airworthiness Arrangement

  • Has Continuing Airworthiness Tasks been contracted i.a.w. Appendix 1?

  • Appendix I<br>Continuing Airworthiness Arrangement<br>1. When an owner contracts an M.A. Subpart G approved continuing airworthiness organisation in accordance with M.A.201 to carry out continuing airworthiness management tasks, upon request by the competent authority a copy of the arrangement shall be sent by the owner to the competent authority of the Member State of registry once it has been signed by both parties.<br>2. The arrangement shall be developed taking into account the requirements of Part M and shall define the obligations of the signatories in relation to continuing airworthiness of the aircraft.<br>3. It shall contain as a minimum the:<br>— aircraft registration,<br>— aircraft type,<br>— aircraft serial number,<br>— aircraft owner or registered lessee's name or company details including the address, M.A. Subpart G approved continuing airworthiness organisation details including the address.<br>4. It shall state the following:<br>‘The owner entrusts to the approved organisation the management of the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft, the development of a maintenance programme that shall be approved by the airworthiness authorities of the Member State where the aircraft is registered, and the organisation of the maintenance of the aircraft according to said maintenance programme in an approved organisation.<br>According to the present arrangement, both signatories undertake to follow the respective obligations of this arrangement.<br>The owner certifies, to the best of their belief that all the information given to the approved organisation concerning the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft is and will be accurate and that the aircraft will not be altered without prior approval of the approved organisation.<br>In case of any non-conformity with this arrangement, by either of the signatories, it will become null. In such a case, the owner will retain full responsibility for every task linked to the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft and the owner will undertake to inform the competent authorities of the Member State of registry within two full weeks.’<br>5. When an owner contracts an M.A. Subpart G approved continuing airworthiness organisation in accordance with M.A.201 the obligations of each party shall be shared as follows:<br>5.1​Obligations of the approved organisation:<br>1. have the aircraft type in the scope of its approval;<br>2. respect the conditions to maintain the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft listed below:<br>(a) develop a maintenance programme for the aircraft, including any reliability programme developed, if applicable;<br>(b) declare the maintenance tasks (in the maintenance programme) that may be carried out by the pilot-owner in accordance with point M.A.803(c);<br>(c) organise the approval of the aircraft’s maintenance programme;<br>(d) once it has been approved, give a copy of the aircraft’s maintenance programme to the owner;<br>(e) organise a bridging inspection with the aircraft’s prior maintenance programme;<br>(f) organise for all maintenance to be carried out by an approved maintenance organisation;<br>(g) organise for all applicable airworthiness directives to be applied;<br>(h) organise for all defects discovered during scheduled maintenance, airworthiness reviews or reported by the owner to be corrected by an approved maintenance organisation;<br>(i) coordinate scheduled maintenance, the application of airworthiness directives, the replacement of life limited parts, and component inspection requirements;<br>(j) inform the owner each time the aircraft shall be brought to an approved maintenance organisation;<br>(k) manage all technical records;<br>(l) archive all technical records;<br>3. organise the approval of any modification to the aircraft in accordance with Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 before it is embodied;<br>4. organise the approval of any repair to the aircraft in accordance with the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 before it is carried out;<br>5. inform the competent authority of the Member State of registry whenever the aircraft is not presented to the approved maintenance organisation by the owner as requested by the approved organisation;<br>6. inform the competent authority of the Member State of registry whenever the present arrangement has not been respected;<br>7. carry out the airworthiness review of the aircraft when necessary and issue the airworthiness review certificate or the recommendation to the competent authority of the Member State of registry;<br>8. send within 10 days a copy of any airworthiness review certificate issued or extended to the competent authority of the Member State of registry;<br>9. carry out all occurrence reporting mandated by applicable regulations;<br>10. inform the competent authority of the Member State of registry whenever the present arrangement is denounced by either party.<br>5.2​Obligations of the owner<br>1. have a general understanding of the approved maintenance programme;<br>2. have a general understanding of this Annex (Part-M);<br>3. present the aircraft to the approved maintenance organisation agreed with the approved organisation at the due time designated by the approved organisation’s request;<br>4. not modify the aircraft without first consulting the approved organisation;<br>5. inform the approved organisation of all maintenance exceptionally carried out without the knowledge and control of the approved organisation;<br>6. report to the approved organisation through the logbook all defects found during operations;<br>7. inform the competent authority of the Member State of registry whenever the present arrangement is denounced by either party;<br>8. inform the competent authority of the Member State of registry and the approved organisation whenever the aircraft is sold;<br>9. carry out all occurrence reporting mandated by applicable regulations;<br>10. inform on a regular basis the approved organisation about the aircraft flying hours and any other utilisation data, as agreed with the approved organisation;<br>11. enter the certificate of release to service in the logbooks as mentioned in point M.A.803(d) when performing pilot-owner maintenance without exceeding the limits of the maintenance tasks list as declared in the approved maintenance programme as laid down in point M.A.803(c);<br>12. inform the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation responsible for the management of the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft not later than 30 days after completion of any pilot-owner maintenance task in accordance with point M.A.305(a).

M.1

  • For the purpose of this Part, the competent authority shall be: <br>1. for the oversight of the continuing airworthiness of individual aircraft and the issue of airworthiness review certificates the authority designated by the Member State of registry.

  • 2. for the oversight of a maintenance organisation as specified in M.A. Subpart F, <br>(i) the authority designated by the Member State where that organisation's principle place of business is located. <br>(ii) the Agency if the organisation is located in a third country.

  • 3. for the oversight of a continuing airworthiness management organisation as specified in M.A. Subpart G, <br>(i) the authority designated by the Member State where that organisation's principle place of business is located if the approval is not included in an air operator's certificate. <br>(ii) the authority designated by the Member State of the operator if the approval is included in an air operator's certificate. <br>(iii) the Agency if the organisation is located in a third country.

  • 4. for the approval of maintenance programmes, <br>(i) the authority designated by the Member State of registry. <br>(ii) in the case of commercial air transport, when the Member State of the operator is different from the State of registry, the authority agreed by the above two States prior to the approval of the maintenance programme. <br>(iii) By derogation from paragraph 4(i), when the continuing airworthiness of an aircraft not used in commercial air transport is managed by a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M) not subject to the oversight of the Member State of registry, and only if agreed with the Member State of registry prior to the approval of the maintenance programme: <br>(a) the authority designated by the Member State responsible for the oversight of the continuing airworthiness management organisation, or <br>(b) the Agency if the continuing airworthiness management organisation is located in a third country.

  • AMC M.1 <br>A competent authority may be a ministry, a national aviation authority or any aviation body designated by the Member State and located within that Member State. A Member State may designate more than one competent authority to cover different areas of responsibility, as long as the designation decision contains a list of the competencies of each authority and there is only one competent authority responsible for each given area of responsibility.

SUBPART A - GENERAL

M.A.101 Scope

  • This Section establishes the measures to be taken to ensure that airworthiness is maintained, including maintenance. It also specifies the conditions to be met by the persons or organisations involved in such continuing airworthiness management.

SUBPART B - ACCOUNTABILITY

M.A.201 Responsibilities - (CAME Part 0.3.2, 0.3.4, 1.9, 1.11, 2.4)

  • (a) The owner is responsible for the continuing airworthiness of an aircraft and shall ensure that no flight takes place unless: - (CAME Part 5)<br>1. the aircraft is maintained in an airworthy condition, and;<br>2. any operational and emergency equipment fitted is correctly installed and serviceable or clearly identified as unserviceable, and;<br>3. the airworthiness certificate remains valid, and;<br>4. the maintenance of the aircraft is performed in accordance with the approved maintenance programme as specified in M.A.302.

  • (b) When the aircraft is leased, the responsibilities of the owner are transferred to the lessee if: - (CAME Part 2.5)<br>1. the lessee is stipulated on the registration document, or;<br>2. detailed in the leasing contract.<br>When reference is made in this Part to the ‘owner’, the term owner covers the owner or the lessee, as applicable.

  • (c) Any person or organisation performing maintenance shall be responsible for the tasks performed.

  • (d) The pilot-in-command or, in the case of commercial air transport, the operator shall be responsible for the satisfactory accomplishment of the pre-flight inspection. This inspection must be carried out by the pilot or another qualified person but need not be carried out by an approved maintenance organisation or by Part-66 certifying staff.

  • (e) In order to satisfy the responsibilities of paragraph (a),<br>(i) the owner of an aircraft may contract the tasks<br>associated with continuing airworthiness to a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M). In this case, the continuing airworthiness management organisation assumes responsibility for the proper accomplishment of these tasks.<br>(ii) An owner who decides to manage the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft under its own responsibility, without a contract in accordance with Appendix I, may nevertheless make a limited contract with a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M), for the development of the maintenance programme and its approval in accordance with point M.A.302. In that case, the limited contract transfers the responsibility for the development and approval of the maintenance programme to the contracted continuing airworthiness management organisation.

  • AMC M.A.201 (e) Responsibilities<br>The limited contract for the development and approval of the aircraft maintenance programme should cover the responsibilities related to M.A.302(d) and (g). This contract may also entitle the M.A. Subpart G organisation to use the indirect approval procedure described in M.A.302(c).

  • (f) In the case of large aircraft, in order to satisfy the responsibilities of paragraph (a) the owner of an aircraft shall ensure that the tasks associated with continuing airworthiness are performed by an approved continuing airworthiness management organisation. A written contract shall be made in accordance with Appendix I. In this case, the continuing airworthiness management organisation assumes responsibility for the proper accomplishment of these tasks.

  • (g) Maintenance of large aircraft, aircraft used for commercial air transport and components thereof shall be carried out by a Part-145 approved maintenance organisation.

  • (h) In the case of commercial air transport the operator is responsible for the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft it operates and shall:<br>- (CAME Part 0.2.2, 3.1, 5)<br>1. be approved, as part of the air operator certificate issued by the competent authority, pursuant to M.A. Subpart G for the aircraft it operates; and<br>2. be approved in accordance with Part-145 or contract such an organisation; and<br>3. ensure that paragraph (a) is satisfied. - (CAME Part 2.2)

  • AMC M.A.201 (h) Responsibilities<br>1. Reference to aircraft includes the components fitted to or intended to be fitted to the aircraft<br>2. The performance of ground de-icing and anti-icing activities does not require a maintenance organisation approval. Nevertheless,<br>inspections required to detect, and when necessary eliminate de-icing and/or anti-icing fluid residues are considered maintenance. Such inspections may only be carried out by suitably authorised personnel.<br>3. The requirement means that the operator is responsible for determining what maintenance is required, when it has to be performed and by whom and to what standard, in order to ensure the continued airworthiness of the aircraft being operated.<br>4. An operator should therefore have adequate knowledge of the design status (type specification, customer options, airworthiness directives (AD), airworthiness limitations contained in CS25 Book 1, Appendix H, paragraph H25.1, fuel tank system airworthiness limitations including Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL), modifications, operational equipment) and required and performed maintenance. The status of aircraft design and maintenance should be adequately documented to support the performance of the quality system.<br>5. An operator should establish adequate co-ordination between flight operations and maintenance to ensure that both will receive all information on the condition of the aircraft necessary to enable both to perform their tasks.<br>6. The requirement does not mean that an operator himself performs the maintenance (this is to be done by a maintenance organisation approved under Part-145) but that the operator carries the responsibility for the airworthy condition of aircraft it operates and thus should be satisfied before the intended flight that all required maintenance has been properly carried out.<br>7. When an operator is not appropriately approved in accordance with Part-145, the operator should provide a clear work order to the maintenance contractor. The fact that an operator has contracted a maintenance organisation approved under Part-145 should not prevent it from checking at the maintenance facilities on any aspect of the contracted work if he wishes to do so to satisfy his responsibility for the airworthiness of the aircraft.

  • AMC M.A.201 (h) 1- Responsibilities (Note: Appendix AMC II)<br>1. An operator only needs to be approved for the management of the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft listed on its AOC. The approval to carry out airworthiness reviews is optional.<br>2. This approval does not prevent the operator subcontracting certain continuing airworthiness management tasks to competent persons or organisations. This activity is considered as an integral element of the operator’s M.A. Subpart G approval. The regulatory monitoring is exercised through the operator’s M.A. Subpart G. approval. The contracts should be acceptable to the competent authority.<br>- (CAME Part 5.3)<br>3. The accomplishment of continuing airworthiness activities forms an important part of the operator’s responsibility with the operator remaining accountable for satisfactory completion irrespective of any contract that may be established.<br>4. Part-M does not provide for organisations to be independently approved to perform continuing airworthiness management tasks on behalf of commercial air transport operators. The approval of such activity is vested in the operator’s air operator’s certificate (AOC). The sub-contracted organisation is considered to perform the continuing airworthiness management tasks as an integral part of the operator's continuing airworthiness management system, irrespective of any other approval held by the subcontractor including a M.A. Subpart G approval.<br>5. The operator is ultimately responsible and therefore accountable for the airworthiness of its aircraft. To exercise this responsibility the operator should be satisfied that the actions taken by sub-contracted organisations meet the standards required by M.A. Subpart G. The operator's management of such activities should therefore be accomplished<br>(a) by active control through direct involvement and/or<br>(b) by endorsing the recommendations made by the sub-contracted organisation.<br>6. In order to retain ultimate responsibility the operator should limit sub-contracted tasks to the activities specified below:<br>(a) airworthiness directive analysis and planning<br>(b) service bulletin analysis<br>(c) planning of maintenance<br>(d) reliability monitoring, engine health monitoring<br>(e) maintenance programme development and amendments<br>(f) any other activities which do not limit the operators responsibilities as agreed by the competent authority.<br>7. The operator's management controls associated with sub-contracted continuing airworthiness management tasks should be reflected in the associated written contract and be in accordance with the operator's policy and procedures defined in his continuing airworthiness management exposition. When such tasks are sub-contracted the operator's continuing airworthiness management system is considered to be extended to the subcontracted organisation.<br>8. With the exception of engines and auxiliary power units, contracts would normally be limited to one organisation per aircraft type for any combination of the activities described in Appendix ll. Where arrangements are made with more than one organisation the operator should demonstrate that adequate co-ordination controls are in place and that the individual responsibilities are clearly defined in related contracts.<br>9. Contracts should not authorise the sub-contracted organisation to sub-contract to other organisations elements of the continuing airworthiness management tasks.<br>10. The operator should ensure that any findings arising from the competent authority monitoring of the sub-contracted continuing airworthiness management tasks will be closed to the satisfaction of the competent authority. This provision should be included in the contract.<br>11. The sub-contracted organisation should agree to notify the respective operators of any changes affecting the contracts as soon as practical. The operator should then inform its competent authority. Failure to do so may invalidate the competent authority acceptance of the contract.<br>12. Appendix AMC II provides information on the sub-contracting of continuing airworthiness management tasks.<br>13. The operator should only sub contract to organisations which are specified by the competent authority on the AOC or EASA Form 14 as<br>applicable.

  • AMC M.A.201 (h) 2- Responsibilities<br>1. The requirement is intended to provide for the possibility of the following three alternative options:<br>(a) an operator to be approved in accordance with Part-145 to carry out all maintenance of the aircraft and components;<br>(b) an operator to be approved in accordance with Part-145 to carry out some of the maintenance of the aircraft and components. This, at<br>minimum, could be limited line maintenance but may be considerably more but still short of option (a);<br>(c) An operator not approved in accordance with Part-145 to carry out any maintenance.<br>2. An operator or prospective operator may apply for any one of these options but it will be for the competent authority to determine which option may be accepted in each particular case.<br>2.1 To make this determination the competent authority will apply the primary criteria of relevant operator experience if carrying out some or all maintenance on comparable aircraft. Therefore where an operator applies for option (a) – all maintenance – the competent authority will need to be satisfied that the operator has sufficient experience of carrying out all maintenance on a comparable type. For example, assuming that the experience is judged satisfactory, then it is reasonable from the maintenance viewpoint to add a different wide bodied aircraft to an existing wide bodied fleet. If the experience is not satisfactory or too limited the competent authority may choose either to require more experienced management and/or more experienced release to service staff or may refuse to accept the new wide bodied aircraft if extra experienced staff cannot be found. Option (b) or (c) may be possible alternatives.<br>2.2 Where an operator applies for option (b) – some maintenance or the competent authority has been unable to accept an application for option (a) – then satisfactory experience is again the key but in this case the satisfactory experience is related to the reduced maintenance of this option. If the experience is not satisfactory or too limited the competent authority may choose to require more experienced staff or may refuse to accept the application if such staff cannot be found. Option (c) may be the possible alternative. Option (c) accepts that the operator either does not have satisfactory experience or has only limited experience of some maintenance.<br>2.3 The competent authority will require an operator to enter into a contract with an appropriately approved Part-145 organisation except in those cases where the competent authority believes that it is possible to obtain sufficient satisfactorily experienced staff to provide the minimal maintenance support for option (b), in which case option (b) would apply.<br>2.4 In respect of this paragraph, ‘experience’ means staff who have proven evidence that they were directly involved with at least line maintenance of similar aircraft types for not less than 12 months. Such experience should be demonstrated to be satisfactory. An operator is required to have enough personnel meeting the requirement of M.A.706 to manage the maintenance responsibility whichever option is used.

  • (i) When an operator is requested by a Member State to hold a certificate for commercial operations, other than for commercial air transport, it shall:<br>1. be appropriately approved, pursuant to M.A. Subpart G, for the management of the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft it operates or contract such an organisation; and<br>2. be appropriately approved in accordance with M.A. Subpart F or Part-145, or contract such organisations; and<br>3. ensure that paragraph (a) is satisfied.

  • (j) The owner/operator is responsible for granting the competent authority access to the organisation/aircraft to determine continued compliance with this Part.

  • Appendix AMC II to M.A. 201 (h) 1 : Sub-contracting of continuing airworthiness management tasks<br>1. SUB-CONTRACTED OPERATOR’S CONTINUING AIRWORTHINESS MANAGEMENT TASKS<br>1.1 To actively control the standards of the sub-contracted organisation the operator should employ a person or group of persons who are trained and competent in the disciplines associated with M.A Subpart G. As such they are responsible for determining what maintenance is required, when it has to be performed and by whom and to what standard, in order to ensure the continued airworthiness of the aircraft being operated.<br>1.2 The operator should conduct a pre-contract audit to establish that the subcontracted organisation can achieve the standards required by M.A Subpart G in connection with those activities to be sub-contracted.<br>1.3 The operator should ensure that the sub-contracted organisation has sufficient qualified personnel who are trained and competent in the functions to be subcontracted. In assessing the adequacy of personnel resources the operator should consider the particular needs of those activities that are to be sub-contracted, while taking into account the subcontracted organisations existing commitments.<br>1.4 To be appropriately approved to contract out continuing airworthiness management tasks the operator should have procedures for the management control of these arrangements. The operator's continuing airworthiness management exposition should contain relevant procedures to reflect his control of those arrangements made with the subcontracted organisation.<br>1.5 Sub-contracted continuing airworthiness management tasks should be addressed in a contract between the operator and the sub- contracted organisation. The contract should also specify that the sub-contracted organisation is responsible for informing the operator who is in turn responsible for notifying the respective competent authority, of any subsequent changes that affect their ability to support the contract.<br>1.6 Organisations providing continuing airworthiness management tasks to support commercial air transport operators should use procedures which set out the manner by which the organisation fulfils its responsibility to those sub-contracted activities. Such procedures may be developed by either the sub-contracted organisation or the operator.<br>1.7 Where the sub-contracted organisation develops its own procedures these should be compatible with the operator's continuing airworthiness management exposition and the terms of the contract. These should be accepted by the competent authority as extended procedures of the operator and as such should be cross-referenced from the continuing airworthiness management exposition. One current copy of the sub- contracted organisation's relevant procedures should be kept by the operator and should be accessible to the competent authority where needed. Note: Should any conflict arise between the sub-contracted organisation’s procedures and those of the operator then the policy and procedures of the continuing airworthiness management exposition will prevail.<br>1.8 The contract should also specify that the sub-contracted organisation’s procedures may only be amended with the agreement of the operator. The operator should ensure that these amendments are compatible with their continuing airworthiness management exposition and in compliance with M.A Subpart G.<br>The operator should nominate who will be responsible for continued monitoring and acceptance of the sub-contracted organisation procedures and their amendments. The controls used to fulfil this function should be clearly set out in the amendment section of the continuing airworthiness management exposition detailing the level of operator involvement.<br>1.9 Whenever any elements of continuing airworthiness management tasks are subcontracted the operator's continuing airworthiness management personnel should have access to all relevant data in order to fulfil their responsibilities.<br>Note: The operator retains authority to override where necessary for the continuing airworthiness of their aircraft, any recommendation of the sub- contracted organisation.<br>1.10 The operator should ensure that the sub-contracted organisation continues to have qualified technical expertise and sufficient resources to perform the subcontracted tasks while in compliance with the relevant procedures. Failure to do so may invalidate the approval of the operators continuing airworthiness management system.<br>1.11 The contract should provide for competent authority monitoring.<br>1.12 The contract should address the respective responsibilities to ensure that any findings arising from the competent authority monitoring will<br>be closed to the satisfaction of the competent authority.<br>2. ACCOMPLISHMENT<br>This paragraph describes topics, which may be applicable in such a sub-contract arrangements.<br>2.1 Scope of work<br>The type of aircraft and their registrations, engine types and/or component subject to the continuing airworthiness management tasks contract should be specified.<br>2.2 Maintenance programme development and amendment<br>The operator may sub-contract the preparation of the draft maintenance programme and any subsequent amendments. However, the operator remains responsible for assessing that the draft proposals meet his needs and obtaining competent authority approval; the relevant procedures should specify these responsibilities. The contract should also stipulate that any data necessary to substantiate the approval of the initial programme or an amendment to this programme should be provided for operator agreement and/or competent authority upon request.<br>2.3 Maintenance programme effectiveness and reliability<br>The operator should have in place a system to monitor and assess the effectiveness of the maintenance programme based on maintenance and operational experience. The collection of data and initial assessment may be made by the sub-contracted organisation; the required actions are to be endorsed by the operator.<br>Where reliability monitoring is used to establish maintenance programme effectiveness, this may be provided by the sub-contracted organisation and should be specified in the relevant procedures. Reference should be made to the operators approved maintenance programme and reliability programme. Participation of the operator's personnel in reliability meetings with the sub-contracted organisation should also be specified.<br>In providing reliability data the sub-contracted organisation is limited to working with primary data/documents provided by the operator or data provided by the operators contracted maintenance organisation(s) from which the reports are derived. The pooling of reliability data is permitted if accepted by the competent authority.<br>2.4 Permitted variations to maintenance programme.<br>The reasons and justification for any proposed variation to scheduled maintenance may be prepared by the sub-contracted organisation. Acceptance of the proposed variation should be granted by the operator. The means by which the operator acceptance is given should be specified in the relevant procedures. When outside the limits set out in the maintenance programme, the operator is required to obtain approval by the competent authority. <br>2.5 Scheduled maintenance<br>Where the sub-contracted organisation plans and defines maintenance checks or inspections in accordance with the approved maintenance programme, the required liaison with the operator, including feedback should be defined.<br>The planning control and documentation should be specified in the appropriate supporting procedures. These procedures should typically set out the operator's level of involvement in each type of check. This will normally involve the operator assessing and agreeing to a work specification on a case by case for base maintenance checks. For routine line maintenance checks this may be controlled on a day-to-day basis by the sub-contracted organisation subject to appropriate liaison and operator controls to ensure timely compliance. This typically may include, but is not necessarily limited to:<br>- Applicable work package, including job cards,<br>- Scheduled component removal list,<br>- ADs to be incorporated,<br>- Modifications to be incorporated<br>The associated procedures should ensure that the operator is advised in a timely manner on the accomplishment of such tasks.<br>2.6 Quality monitoring<br>The operator's quality system should monitor the adequacy of the sub-contracted continuing airworthiness management task performance for compliance with the contract and M.A Subpart G. The terms of the contract should therefore include a provision allowing the operator to perform a quality surveillance (including audits) upon the subcontracted organisation. The aim of the surveillance is primarily to investigate and judge the effectiveness of those sub-contracted activities and thereby to ensure compliance with M.A Subpart G and the contract. Audit reports may be subject to review when requested by the competent authority.<br>2.7 Access by the competent authority<br>The contract should specify that the sub-contracted organisation should always grant access to the competent authority.<br>2.8 Maintenance data<br>The maintenance data used for the purpose of the contract should be specified, together with those responsible for providing such documentation and the competent authority responsible for the acceptance/approval of such data when applicable. The operator should ensure such data including revisions is readily available to the operator's continuing airworthiness management personnel and those in the sub-contracted organisation who may be required to assess such data. The operator should establish a 'fast track' means of ensuring that urgent data is transmitted to the sub-contractor in a timely manner.<br>Maintenance data may include, but is not necessarily limited to:<br>- Maintenance programme,<br>- ADs,<br>- Service Bulletins,<br>- Major repairs/modification data,<br>- Aircraft Maintenance Manual,<br>- Engine overhaul manual,<br>- Aircraft IPC,<br>- Wiring diagrams,<br>- Trouble shooting manual,<br>2.9 Airworthiness directives<br>While the various aspects of AD assessment, planning and follow-up may be accomplished by the sub-contracted organisation, embodiment is performed by a Part-145 maintenance organisation. The operator is responsible for ensuring timely embodiment of applicable ADs and is to be provided with notification of compliance. It therefore follows that the operator should have clear policies and procedures on AD embodiment supported by defined procedures which will ensure that the operator agrees to the proposed means of compliance.<br>The relevant procedures should specify:<br>- What information (e.g. AD publications, continuing airworthiness records, flight hours/cycles, etc.) the sub-contracted organisation needs from<br>the operator.<br>- What information (e.g. AD planning listing, detailed engineering order, etc) the operator needs from the sub-contracted organisation in order to ensure timely compliance with ADs.<br>To fulfil their above responsibility, operators should ensure that they are in receipt of current mandatory continued airworthiness information for the aircraft and equipment that they operate.<br>2.10 Service bulletin/modifications<br>The sub-contracted organisation may be required to review and make recommendations on embodiment of an SB and other associated non- mandatory material based on a clear operator policy. This should be specified in the contract.<br>2.11 Service life limit controls & component control/removal forecast.<br>Where the sub-contracted organisation performs planning activities, it should be specified that the organisation should be in receipt of the current flight cycles; flight hours; landings and/or calendar controlled details as applicable, at a frequency to be specified in the contract. The frequency should be such that it allows the organisation to properly perform the sub-contracted planning functions. It therefore follows that there will need to be adequate liaison between the operator, his Part-145 maintenance organisation(s) and the sub-contracted organisation. Additionally the contract should specify how the operator will be in possession of all current flight cycles, flight hours, etc. in order that the operator may assure the timely accomplishment of the required maintenance.<br>2.12 health monitoring<br>If the operator sub-contracts the on wing engine health monitoring, the sub-contracted organisation should be in receipt of all the relevant information to perform this task, including any parameter reading deemed necessary to be supplied by the operator for this control. The contract should also specify what kind of feedback information (such as engine limitation, appropriate technical advice, etc.) the organisation should provide to the operator.<br>2.13 Defect control<br>Where the operator has sub-contracted the day-to-day control of technical log deferred defects this should be specified in the contract and should be adequately described in the appropriate procedures. The operator’s MEL/CDL provides the basis for establishing which defects may be deferred and associated limits. The procedures should also define the responsibilities and actions to be taken for defects such as AOG situations, repetitive defects, and damage beyond type certificate holder’s limits. For all other defects identified during maintenance, the information should be brought to the attention of the operator who dependant upon the procedural authority granted by the competent authority may determine that some defects can be deferred. Therefore, adequate liaison between the operator, his sub-contracted organisation and contracted Part-145 maintenance organisation should be ensured.<br>The sub-contracted organisation should make a positive assessment of potential deferred defects and consider potential hazards arising from the cumulative effect of any combination of defects. The sub-contracted organisations should liaise with the operator to gain his agreement following this assessment.<br>Deferment of MEL/CDL allowable defects can be accomplished by a contracted Part-145 organisation in compliance with the relevant technical log procedures, subject to the acceptance by the aircraft commander.<br>2.14 Mandatory occurrence reporting<br>All incidents and occurrences that fall within the reporting criteria defined in Part-M and Part-145 should be reported as required by the respective requirements. The operator should ensure adequate liaison exists with the sub-contracted organisation and the Part-145 organisation.<br>2.15 Continuing airworthiness records<br>These may be maintained and kept by the sub-contracted organisation on behalf of the operator who remains the owner of these documents. However, the operator should be provided with the current status of AD compliance and service life limited components in accordance with agreed procedures. The operator should also be provided with unrestricted and timely access to original records as and when needed. On-line access to the appropriate information systems is acceptable.<br>The record keeping requirements of Part-M should be satisfied. Access to the records by duly authorised members of the competent authority should be arranged upon request.<br>2.16 Check flight procedures<br>Check Flights are carried out under the control of the operator. Check flight requirements from the sub-contracted organisation or contracted Part-145 maintenance organisations should be agreed by the operator<br>2.17 Communication between the operator and sub-contracted organisation<br>2.17.1 To exercise airworthiness responsibility the operator needs to be in receipt of all relevant reports and relevant maintenance data. The contract should specify what information should be provided and when.<br>2.17.2 Meetings provide one important corner stone whereby the operator can exercise part of its responsibility for ensuring the airworthiness of the operated aircraft. They should be used to establish good communications between the operator, the sub-contracted organisation and, where different to the foregoing, the contracted Part-145 organisation.<br>The terms of contract should include whenever appropriate the provision for a certain number of meetings to be held between involved parties. Details of the types of liaison meetings and associated terms of reference of each meeting should be documented. The meetings may include but are not limited to all or a combination of:<br>a - Contract review<br>Before the contract is applicable, it is very important that the technical personnel of both parties that are involved in the application of the contract meet in order to be sure that every point leads to a common understanding of the duties of both parties.<br>b - Work scope planning meeting<br>Work scope planning meetings may be organised so that the tasks to be performed may be commonly agreed.<br>c - Technical meeting<br>Scheduled meetings should be organised in order to review on a regular basis and agree actions on technical matters such as ADs, SBs, future modifications, major defects found during shop visit, reliability, etc...<br>d - Quality meeting<br>Quality meetings should be organised in order to examine matters raised by the operator's quality surveillance and the competent authority’s monitoring activity and to agree upon necessary corrective actions.<br>e - Reliability meeting<br>When a reliability programme exists, the contract should specify the operator's and Part-145 approved organisation's respective involvement in that programme, including the participation to reliability meetings. Provision to enable the competent authority participation in the periodical reliability meetings should also be provided.

M.A.202 Occurrence reporting

  • (a) Any person or organisation responsible in accordance with point M.A.201 shall report to the competent authority designated by the State of Registry, the organisation responsible for the type design or supplemental type design and, if applicable, the Member State of operator, any identified condition of an aircraft or component which endangers flight safety.

  • AMC M.A.202 (a) Occurrence reporting<br>Accountable persons or organisations should ensure that the type certificate (TC) holder receives adequate reports of occurrences for that aircraft type, to enable it to issue appropriate service instructions and recommendations to all owners or operators.<br>Liaison with the TC holder is recommended to establish whether published or proposed service information will resolve the problem or to obtain a solution to a particular problem.<br>An approved continuing airworthiness management or maintenance organisation should assign responsibility for co-ordinating action on airworthiness occurrences and for initiating any necessary further investigation and follow-up activity to a suitably qualified person with clearly defined authority and status.<br>In respect of maintenance, reporting a condition which is normally limited to:<br>‐ serious cracks, permanent deformation, burning or serious corrosion of structure found during scheduled maintenance of the aircraft or component.<br>‐ failure of any emergency system during scheduled testing.

  • (b) Reports shall be made in a manner established by the Agency and contain all pertinent information about the condition known to the person or organisation.

  • AMC M.A.202 (b) Occurrence reporting<br>The reports may be transmitted by any method i.e. electronically, by post or by facsimile. Each report should contain at least the following information:<br>‐ reporter or organisation’s name and approval reference if applicable,<br>‐ information necessary to identify the subject aircraft and/or component, - date and time relative to any life or overhaul limitation in terms of flying hours/cycles/landings etc. as appropriate,<br>‐ details of the occurrence.

  • (c) Where the person or organisation maintaining the aircraft is contracted by an owner or an operator to carry out maintenance, the person or the organisation maintaining the aircraft shall also report to the owner, the operator or the continuing airworthiness management organisation any such condition affecting the owner's or the operator's aircraft or component.

  • (d) Reports shall be made as soon as practicable, but in any case within 72 hours of the person or organisation identifying the condition to which the report relates.

  • AMC 20-8 General Acceptable Means of Compliance for Airworthiness of Products, Parts and Appliances provides further guidance on occurrence reporting<br>(Se tillæg.- CD)<br>

SUBPART C - CONTINUING AIRWORTHINESS

M.A.301 Continuing airworthiness tasks - (CAME Part 0.3.2, 0.3.4, 1.1, 1.1.3.1, 1.1.3.4)

  • The aircraft continuing airworthiness and the serviceability of both operational and emergency equipment shall be ensured by:<br>1. the accomplishment of pre-flight inspections; - (CAME Part 1. 11, 1.11.2)<br>2. The rectification in accordance with the data specified in point M.A.304 and/or point M.A.401, as applicable, of any defect and damage affecting safe operation, taking into account, for all large aircraft or aircraft used for commercial air transport, the minimum equipment list and configuration deviation list as applicable to the aircraft type;<br>3. the accomplishment of all maintenance, in accordance with the M.A.302 approved aircraft maintenance programme; - (CAME Part 1.2.1)<br>4. for all large aircraft or aircraft used for commercial air transport the analysis of the effectiveness of the M.A.302 approved maintenance<br>programme; - (CAME Part 1. 5)<br>5. the accomplishment of any applicable - (CAME Part 1. 4):<br>(i) airworthiness directive,<br>(ii) operational directive with a continuing airworthiness impact,<br>(iii) continued airworthiness requirement established by the Agency,<br>(iv) measures mandated by the competent authority in immediate reaction to a safety problem;<br>6. the accomplishment of modifications and repairs in accordance with M.A.304;<br>7. for non-mandatory modifications and/or inspections, for all large aircraft or aircraft used for commercial air transport the establishment of an embodiment policy;<br>8. maintenance check flights when necessary. - (CAME Part 1. 13)

  • AMC M.A.301 -1- Continuing airworthiness tasks<br>1. With regard to the pre-flight inspection it is intended to mean all of the actions necessary to ensure that the aircraft is fit to make the intended flight. These should typically include but are not necessarily limited to:<br>(a) a walk-around type inspection of the aircraft and its emergency equipment for condition including, in particular, any obvious signs of wear, damage or leakage. In addition, the presence of all required equipment including emergency equipment should be established.<br>(b) an inspection of the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system or the operators technical log as applicable to ensure that the intended flight is not adversely affected by any outstanding deferred defects and that no required maintenance action shown in the maintenance statement is overdue or will become due during the flight.<br>(c) a control that consumable fluids, gases etc. uplifted prior to flight are of the correct specification, free from contamination, and correctly recorded.<br>(d) a control that all doors are securely fastened.<br>(e) a control that control surface and landing gear locks, pitot/static covers, restraint devices and engine/aperture blanks have been removed.<br>(f) a control that all the aircraft’s external surfaces and engines are free from ice, snow, sand, dust etc. and an assessment to confirm that, as<br>the result of meteorological conditions and de-icing/anti-icing fluids having been previously applied on it, there are no fluid residues that could endanger flight safety. Alternatively to this pre-flight assessment, when the type of aircraft and nature of operations allow for it, the build up of residues may be controlled through scheduled maintenance inspections/cleanings identified in the approved maintenance programme..<br>2. Tasks such as oil and hydraulic fluid uplift and tyre inflation may be considered as part of the pre-flight inspection. The related pre-flight inspection instructions should address the procedures to determine where the necessary uplift or inflation results from an abnormal consumption and possibly requires additional maintenance action by the approved maintenance organisation or certifying staff as appropriate.<br>3. In the case of commercial air transport, an operator should publish guidance to maintenance and flight personnel and any other personnel performing pre-flight inspection tasks, as appropriate, defining responsibilities for these actions and, where tasks are contracted to other organisations, how their accomplishment is subject to the quality system of M.A.712. It should be demonstrated to the competent authority that pre- flight inspection personnel have received appropriate training for the relevant pre-flight inspection tasks. The training standard for personnel performing the pre-flight inspection should be described in the operator’s continuing airworthiness management exposition.

  • AMC M.A.301 - 2- Continuing airworthiness tasks<br>In the case of commercial air transport the operator should have a system to ensure that all defects affecting the safe operation of the aircraft are rectified within the limits prescribed by the approved minimum equipment list (MEL) or configuration deviation list (CDL) as appropriate. Also that such defect rectification cannot be postponed unless agreed by the operator and in accordance with a procedure approved by the competent authority.<br>In the case of commercial air transport or large aircraft, a system of assessment should be in operation to support the continuing airworthiness of an aircraft and to provide a continuous analysis of the effectiveness of the M.A. Subpart G approved continuing airworthiness management organisation’s defect control system in use.<br>The system should provide for:<br>(a) significant incidents and defects: monitor incidents and defects that have occurred in flight and defects found during maintenance and overhaul, highlighting any that appear significant in their own right.<br>(b) repetitive incidents and defects: monitor on a continuous basis defects occurring in flight and defects found during maintenance and overhaul, highlighting any that are repetitive.<br>(c) deferred and carried forward defects: Monitor on a continuous basis deferred and carried forward defects. Deferred defects are defined as those defects reported in operational service which are deferred for later rectification. Carried forward defects are defined as those defects arising during maintenance which are carried forward for rectification at a later maintenance input.<br>(d) unscheduled removals and system performance: analyse unscheduled component removals and the performance of aircraft systems for use as part of the maintenance programme efficiency.<br>When deferring or carrying forward a defect the cumulative effect of a number of deferred or carried forward defects occurring on the same aircraft and any restrictions contained in the MEL should be considered. Whenever possible, deferred defects should be made known to the pilot/flight crew prior to their arrival at the aircraft.

  • AMC M.A.301 - 4- Continuing airworthiness tasks<br>The operator or the contracted M.A. Subpart G approved organisation as applicable should have a system to analyse the effectiveness of the maintenance programme, with regard to spares, established defects, malfunctions and damage, and to amend the maintenance programme accordingly.

  • AMC M.A.301 - 3- Continuing airworthiness tasks<br>The owner or the M.A. Subpart G approved continuing airworthiness management organisation as applicable should have a system to ensure that all aircraft maintenance checks are performed within the limits prescribed by the approved aircraft maintenance programme and that, whenever a maintenance check cannot be performed within the required time limit, its postponement is allowed in accordance with a procedure agreed by the appropriate competent authority.

  • AMC M.A.301 -5- Continuing Airworthiness Tasks<br>Operational directives with a continuing airworthiness impact include operating rules such as extended twin-engine operations (ETOPS) / long range operations (LROPS), reduced vertical separation minima (RVSM), MNPS, all weather operations (AWOPS), RNAV, etc.<br>Any other continued airworthiness requirement made mandatory by the Agency includes TC related requirements such as: certification maintenance requirements (CMR), certification life limited parts, airworthiness limitations contained in CS25 Book 1, Appendix H, paragraph H25.1, fuel tank system airworthiness limitations, including Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL), etc.

  • AMC M.A.301 - 7- Continuing airworthiness tasks<br>An operator or a contracted M.A. Subpart G approved organisation as applicable should establish and work to a policy, which assesses non-mandatory information related to the airworthiness of the aircraft. Non mandatory information such as service bulletins, service letters and other information that is produced for the aircraft and its components by an approved design organisation, the manufacturer, the competent authority or the Agency.

M.A.302 Aircraft Maintenance Programme - (CAME Part 0.3.4, 1.2.1, 1.2.3, 1.8)

  • AMC M.A.302 Aircraft Maintenance Programme (Note: Appendix AMC I - (CAME Part 1.9, 1.10))<br>1. The term “maintenance programme” is intended to include scheduled maintenance tasks the associated procedures and standard maintenance practises. The term “maintenance schedule” is intended to embrace the scheduled maintenance tasks alone.<br>2. The aircraft should only be maintained to one approved maintenance programme at a given point in time. Where an owner or operator wishes to change from one approved programme to other, a transfer check or inspection may need to be performed in order to implement the change. 3. The maintenance programme details should be reviewed at least annually. As a minimum revisions of documents affecting the programme basis need to be considered by the owner or operator for inclusion in the maintenance programme during the annual review. Applicable mandatory requirements for compliance with Part-21 should be incorporated into the owner or operator’s maintenance programme as soon as possible<br>4. The aircraft maintenance programme should contain a preface which will define the maintenance programme contents, the inspection standards to be applied, permitted variations to task frequencies and where applicable, any procedure to manage the evolution of established check or inspection intervals.<br>Appendix AMC I to AMC M.A.302 provides detailed information on the contents of an approved aircraft maintenance programme.<br>5. Repetitive maintenance tasks derived from modifications and repairs should be incorporated into the approved maintenance programme.

  • (a) Maintenance of each aircraft shall be organised in accordance with an aircraft maintenance programme. - (CAME Part 1.2.2, 5)

  • AMC M.A.302(a) Aircraft Maintenance Programme<br>A maintenance programme may indicate that it applies to several aircraft registrations as long as the maintenance programme clearly identifies the effectivity of the tasks and procedures that are not applicable to all of the listed registrations.

  • (b) The aircraft maintenance programme and any subsequent amendments shall be approved by the competent authority.<br> - (CAME Part 1.2.2, 5)

  • (c) When the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft is managed by a continuing airworthiness management organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart G of this Annex (Part M), the aircraft maintenance programme and its amendments may be approved through an indirect approval procedure. - (CAME Part 1.10)<br>(i) In that case, the indirect approval procedure shall be established by the continuing airworthiness management organisation as part of the Continuing Airworthiness Management Exposition and shall be approved by the competent authority responsible for that continuing airworthiness management organisation.<br>(ii) The continuing airworthiness management organisation shall not use the indirect approval procedure when this organisation is not under the oversight of the Member State of Registry, unless an agreement exists in accordance with point M.1, paragraph 4(ii) or 4(iii), as applicable, transferring the responsibility for the approval of the aircraft maintenance programme to the competent authority responsible for the continuing airworthiness management organisation.

  • (d) The aircraft maintenance programme must establish compliance with:<br> - (CAME Part 1.10, 5):<br>(i) instructions issued by the competent authority;<br>(ii) instructions for continuing airworthiness - (CAME Part 1.4):<br>‒ issued by the holders of the type-certificate, restricted type-certificate, supplemental type-certificate, major repair design approval, ETSO authorisation or any other relevant approval issued under Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 and its Annex (Part-21), and<br>‒ included in the certification specifications referred to in point 21A.90B or 21A.431B of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003, if applicable;<br>(iii) additional or alternative instructions proposed by the owner or the continuing airworthiness management organisation once approved in accordance with point M.A.302, except for intervals of safety related tasks referred in paragraph (e), which may be escalated, subject to sufficient reviews carried out in accordance with paragraph (g) and only when subject to direct approval in accordance with point M.A.302(b).

  • AMC M.A.302(d) Aircraft Maintenance Programme compliance<br>1. An owner or operator’s maintenance programme should normally be based upon the maintenance review board (MRB) report where applicable, the maintenance planning document (MPD), the relevant chapters of the maintenance manual or any other maintenance data containing information on scheduling. Furthermore, an owner or operator’s maintenance programme should also take into account any maintenance data containing information on scheduling for components.<br>2. Instructions issued by the competent authority can encompass all types of instructions from a specific task for a particular aircraft to complete recommended maintenance schedules for certain aircraft types that can be used by the owner/operator directly. These instructions may be issued by the competent authority in the following cases:<br>• in the absence of specific recommendations of the Type Certificate Holder.<br>• to provide alternate instructions to those described in the subparagraph 1 above, with the objective of providing flexibility to the operator.<br>3. Where an aircraft type has been subjected to the MRB report process, an operator should normally develop the initial operator’s aircraft maintenance programme based upon the MRB report.<br>4. Where an aircraft is maintained in accordance with an aircraft maintenance programme based upon the MRB report process, any associated programme for the continuous surveillance of the reliability, or health monitoring of the aircraft should be considered as part of the aircraft maintenance programme.<br>5. Aircraft maintenance programmes for aircraft types subjected to the MRB report process should contain identification cross reference to the MRB report tasks such that it is always possible to relate such tasks to the current approved aircraft maintenance programme. This does not prevent the approved aircraft maintenance programme from being developed in the light of service experience to beyond the MRB report recommendations but will show the relationship to such recommendations<br>6. Some approved aircraft maintenance programmes, not developed from the MRB process, utilise reliability programmes. Such reliability programmes should be considered as a part of the approved maintenance programme.<br>7. Alternate and/or additional instructions to those defined in paragraphs M.A.302(d)(i) and (ii), proposed by the owner or the operator, may include but are not limited to the following:<br>• Escalation of the interval for certain tasks based on reliability data or other supporting information. Appendix I recommends that the maintenance programme contains the corresponding escalation procedures. The escalation of these tasks is directly approved by the competent authority, except in the case of ALIs (Airworthiness Limitations), which are approved by the Agency.<br>• More restrictive intervals than those proposed by the TC holder as a result of the reliability data or because of a more stringent operational environment.<br>• Additional tasks at the discretion of the operator.

  • (e) The aircraft maintenance programme shall contain details, including frequency, of all maintenance to be carried out, including any specific tasks linked to the type and the specificity of operations.

  • (f) For large aircraft, when the maintenance programme is based on maintenance steering group logic or on condition monitoring, the aircraft maintenance programme shall include a reliability programme.

  • AMC M.A.302 (f) Aircraft Maintenance Programme - reliability programmes.<br>1. Reliability programmes should be developed for aircraft maintenance programmes based upon maintenance steering group (MSG) logic or those that include condition monitored components or that do not contain overhaul time periods for all significant system components.<br>2. Reliability programmes need not be developed for aircraft not considered as large aircraft or that contain overhaul time periods for all significant aircraft system components.<br>3. The purpose of a reliability programme is to ensure that the aircraft maintenance programme tasks are effective and their periodicity is adequate.<br>4. The reliability programme may result in the escalation or deletion of a maintenance task, as well as the de-escalation or addition of a maintenance task<br>5. A reliability programme provides an appropriate means of monitoring the effectiveness of the maintenance programme.<br>6. Appendix AMC I to AMC M.A.302 and M.B.301 (d) gives further guidance.

  • (g) The aircraft maintenance programme shall be subject to periodic reviews and amended accordingly when necessary. These reviews shall ensure that the programme continues to be valid in light of the operating experience and instructions from the competent authority whilst taking into account new and/or modified maintenance instructions promulgated by the type certificate and supplementary type certificate holders and any other organisation that publishes such data in accordance with Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003.

  • Appendix AMC I to AMC M.A.302<br>Content of the maintenance programme<br>1 General requirements<br>1.1 The maintenance programme should contain the following basic information.<br>1.1.1 The type/model and registration number of the aircraft, engines and, where applicable, auxiliary power units and propellers<br>1.1.2 The name and address of the owner, operator or M.A Subpart G approved organisation managing the aircraft airworthiness.<br>1.1.3 The reference, the date of issue and issue number of the approved maintenance programme.<br>1.1.4 A statement signed by the owner, operator or M.A Subpart G approved organisation managing the aircraft airworthiness to the effect that<br>the specified aircraft will be maintained to the programme and that the programme will be reviewed and updated as required.<br>1.1.5 Contents/list of effective pages and their revision status of the document.<br>1.1.6 Check periods, which reflect the anticipated utilisation of the aircraft. Such utilisation should be stated and include a tolerance of not more<br>than 25%. Where utilisation cannot be anticipated, calendar time limits should also be included.<br>1.1.7 Procedures for the escalation of established check periods, where applicable and acceptable to the competent authority of registry.<br>1.1.8 Provision to record the date and reference of approved amendments incorporated in the maintenance programme.<br>1.1.9 Details of pre-flight maintenance tasks that are accomplished by maintenance staff.<br>1.1.10 The tasks and the periods (intervals/frequencies) at which each part of the aircraft, engines, APU’s, propellers, components, accessories, equipment, instruments, electrical and radio apparatus, together with the associated systems and installations should be inspected. This should include the type and degree of inspection required.<br>1.1.11 The periods at which components should be checked, cleaned, lubricated, replenished, adjusted and tested.<br>1.1.12 If applicable details of ageing aircraft system requirements together with any specified sampling programmes.<br>1.1.13 If applicable details of specific structural maintenance programmes where issued by the type certificate holder including but not limited to:<br>a. Maintenance of structural Integrity by damage Tolerance and Supplemental Structural Inspection Programmes (SSID).<br>b. Structural maintenance programmes resulting from the SB review performed by the TC holder.<br>c. Corrosion prevention and control.<br>d. Repair Assessment.<br>e. Widespread Fatigue Damage<br>1.1.14 If applicable, details of Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations together with appropriate procedures.<br>1.1.15 If applicable a statement of the limit of validity in terms of total flight cycles/calendar date/flight hours for the structural programme in<br>1.1.13.<br>1.1.16 The periods at which overhauls and/or replacements by new or overhauled components should be made.<br>1.1.17 A cross-reference to other documents approved by the Agency which contain the details of maintenance tasks related to mandatory life<br>limitations, Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR’s) and ADs.<br>Note: To prevent inadvertent variations to such tasks or intervals these items should not be included in the main portion of the maintenance programme document, or any planning control system, without specific identification of their mandatory status.<br>1.1.18 Details of, or cross-reference to, any required reliability programme or statistical methods of continuous Surveillance.<br>1.1.19 A statement that practices and procedures to satisfy the programme should be to the standards specified in the TC holder’s Maintenance<br>Instructions. In the case of approved practices and procedures that differ, the statement should refer to them.<br>1.1.20 Each maintenance task quoted should be defined in a definition section of the programme.<br>2 Programme basis<br>2.1 An owner or an M.A Subpart G approved organisation’s aircraft maintenance programme should normally be based upon the MRB report, where applicable, and the TC holder’s maintenance planning document or Chapter 5 of the maintenance manual, (i.e. the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance programme).<br>The structure and format of these maintenance recommendations may be re-written by the owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation to better suit the operation and control of the particular maintenance programme.<br>2.2 For a newly type-certificated aircraft where no previously approved maintenance programme exists, it will be necessary for the owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation to comprehensively appraise the manufacturer’s recommendations (and the MRB report where applicable), together with other airworthiness information, in order to produce a realistic programme for approval.<br>2.3 For existing aircraft types it is permissible for the operator to make comparisons with maintenance programmes previously approved. It should not be assumed that a programme approved for one owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation would automatically be approved for another.<br>Evaluation should be made of the aircraft/fleet utilisation, landing rate, equipment fit and, in particular, the experience of the owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation when assessing an existing programme.<br>Where the competent authority is not satisfied that the proposed maintenance programme can be used as is, the competent authority should request appropriate changes such as additional maintenance tasks or de-escalation of check frequencies as necessary.<br>2.4 Critical Design Configuration Control Limitations (CDCCL)<br>If CDCCL have been identified for the aircraft type by the TC/STC holder, maintenance instructions should be developed. CDCCL’s are characterised by features in an aircraft installation or component that should be retained during modification, change, repair, or scheduled maintenance for the operational life of the aircraft or applicable component or part.<br>3 Amendments<br>Amendments (revisions) to the approved maintenance programme should be made by the owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation, to reflect changes in the TC holder’s recommendations, modifications, service experience, or as required by the competent authority.<br>4 Permitted variations to maintenance periods<br>The owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation may only vary the periods prescribed by the programme with the approval of the competent authority or through a procedure developed in the maintenance programme and approved by the competent authority.<br>5 Periodic review of maintenance programme contents<br>5.1 The owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation’s approved maintenance programmes should be subject to periodic review to ensure that they reflect current TC holder’s recommendations, revisions to the MRB report if applicable, mandatory requirements and the maintenance needs of the aircraft.<br>5.2 The owner or the M.A Subpart G approved organisation should review the detailed requirements at least annually for continued validity in the light of operating experience.<br>6. Reliability Programmes<br>6.1 Applicability<br>6.1.1 A reliability programme should be developed in the following cases:<br>(a) the aircraft maintenance programme is based upon MSG-3 logic<br>(b) the aircraft maintenance programme includes condition monitored components<br>(c) the aircraft maintenance programme does not contain overhaul time periods for all significant system components (d) when specified by the Manufacturer’s maintenance planning document or MRB.<br>6.1.2 A reliability Programme need not be developed in the following cases:<br>(a) the maintenance programme is based upon the MSG-1 or 2 logic but only contains hard time or on condition items<br>(b) the aircraft is not a large aircraft according to Part-M<br>(c) the aircraft maintenance programme provides overhaul time periods for all significant system components.<br>Note : for the purpose of this paragraph, a significant system is a system the failure of which could hazard the aircraft safety.<br>6.1.3 Notwithstanding paragraphs 6.1.1 and 6.1.2 above, an M.A.Subpart G organisation may however, develop its own reliability monitoring programme when it may be deemed beneficial from a maintenance planning point of view.<br>6.2 Applicability for M.A.Subpart G organisation/operator of small fleets of aircraft<br>6.2.1 For the purpose of this paragraph, a small fleet of aircraft is a fleet of less than 6 aircraft of the same type.<br>6.2.2 The requirement for a reliability programme is irrespective of the M.A.Subpart G organisation’s fleet size.<br>6.2.3 Complex reliability programmes could be inappropriate for a small fleet. It is recommended that such M.A.Subpart G organisations tailor<br>their reliability programmes to suit the size and complexity of operation.<br>6.2.4 One difficulty with a small fleet of aircraft consists in the amount of available data which can be processed: when this amount is too low, the calculation of alert level is very coarse. Therefore “alert levels” should be used carefully.<br>6.2.5 An M.A.Subpart G organisation of a small fleet of aircraft, when establishing a reliability programme, should consider the following:<br>(a) The programme should focus on areas where a sufficient amount of data is likely to be processed.<br>(b) When the amount of available data is very limited, the M.A.Subpart G organisation’s engineering judgement is then a vital element. In<br>the following examples, careful engineering analysis should be exercised before taking decisions:<br> A “0” rate in the statistical calculation may possibly simply reveal that enough statistical data is missing, rather that there is no<br>potential problem.<br> When alert levels are used, a single event may have the figures reach the alert level. Engineering judgement is necessary so as to<br>discriminate an artefact from an actual need for a corrective action.<br> In making his engineering judgement, an M.A.Subpart G organisation is encouraged to establish contact and make comparisons<br>with other M.A.Subpart G organisations of the same aircraft, where possible and relevant. Making comparison with data provided<br>by the manufacturer may also be possible.<br>6.2.6 In order to obtain accurate reliability data, it should be recommended to pool data and analysis with one or more other M.A.Subpart G<br>organisation(s). Paragraph 6.6 of this paragraph specifies under which conditions it is acceptable that M.A.Subpart G organisations share<br>reliability data.<br>6.2.7 Notwithstanding the above there are cases where the M.A.Subpart G organisation will be unable to pool data with other M.A.Subpart G<br>organisation, e.g. at the introduction to service of a new type. In that case the competent authority should impose additional restrictions on<br>the MRB/MPD tasks intervals (e.g. no variations or only minor evolution are possible, and with the competent authority approval).<br>6.3 Engineering judgement<br>6.3.1 Engineering judgement is itself inherent to reliability programmes as no interpretation of data is possible without judgement. In approving the M.A.Subpart G organisation’s maintenance and reliability programmes, the competent authority is expected to ensure that the organisation which runs the programme (it may be the M.A.Subpart G organisation, or an Part-145 organisation under contract) hires sufficiently qualified personnel with appropriate engineering experience and understanding of reliability concept (see AMC M.A.706)<br>6.3.2 It follows that failure to provide appropriately qualified personnel for the reliability programme may lead the competent authority to reject the approval of the reliability programme and therefore the aircraft maintenance programme.<br>6.4 Contracted maintenance<br>6.4.1 Whereas M.A.302 specifies that, the aircraft maintenance programme -which includes the associated reliability programme-, should be<br>managed and presented by the M.A.Subpart G organisation to the competent authority, it is understood that the M.A.Subpart G organisation may delegate certain functions to the Part-145 organisation under contract, provided this organisation proves to have the appropriate expertise.<br>6.4.2 These functions are:<br>(a) Developing the aircraft maintenance and reliability programmes,<br>(b) Performing the collection and analysis of the reliability data,<br>(c) Providing reliability reports, and<br>(d) Proposing corrective actions to the M.A.Subpart G organisation.<br>6.4.3 Notwithstanding the above decision to implement a corrective action (or the decision to request from the competent authority the approval to implement a corrective action) remains the M.A.Subpart G organisation’s prerogative and responsibility. In relation to paragraph 6.4.2(d) above, a decision not to implement a corrective action should be justified and documented.<br>6.4.4 The arrangement between the M.A.Subpart G organisation and the Part-145 organisation should be specified in the maintenance contract (see appendix 11) and the relevant CAME, and MOE procedures.<br>6.5 Reliability programme<br>In preparing the programme details, account should be taken of this paragraph. All associated procedures should be clearly defined.<br>6.5.1 Objectives<br>6.5.1.1 A statement should be included summarising as precisely as possible the prime objectives of the programme. To the minimum it should<br>include the following:<br>(a) to recognise the need for corrective action,<br>(b) to establish what corrective action is needed and, (c) to determine the effectiveness of that action<br>6.5.1.2 The extent of the objectives should be directly related to the scope of the programme.<br>Its scope could vary from a component defect monitoring system for a small M.A.Subpart G organisation, to an integrated maintenance management programme for a big M.A.Subpart G organisation. The manufacturer’s maintenance planning documents may give guidance on the objectives and should be consulted in every case.<br>6.5.1.3 In case of a MSG-3 based maintenance programme, the reliability programme should provide a monitor that all MSG-3 related tasks from the maintenance programme are effective and their periodicity is adequate.<br>6.5.2 Identification of items.<br>The items controlled by the programme should be stated, e.g. by ATA Chapters.<br>Where some items (e.g. aircraft structure, engines, APU) are controlled by separate programmes, the associated procedures (e.g. individual sampling or life development programmes, constructor’s structure sampling programmes) should be cross referenced in the programme.<br>6.5.3 Terms and definitions.<br>The significant terms and definitions applicable to the Programme should be clearly identified. Terms are already defined in MSG-3, Part- 145 and Part-M.<br>6.5.4 Information sources and collection.<br>6.5.4.1 Sources of information should be listed and procedures for the transmission of information from the sources, together with the procedure for collecting and receiving it, should be set out in detail in the CAME or MOE as appropriate.<br>6.5.4.2 The type of information to be collected should be related to the objectives of the Programme and should be such that it enables both an<br>overall broad based assessment of the information to be made and also allow for assessments to be made as to whether any reaction, both to trends and to individual events, is necessary. The following are examples of the normal prime sources:<br>(a) Pilots Reports.<br>(b) Technical Logs.<br>(c) Aircraft Maintenance Access Terminal / On-board Maintenance System readouts.<br>(d) Maintenance Worksheets.<br>(e) Workshop Reports.<br>(f) Reports on Functional Checks.<br>(g) Reports on Special Inspections<br>(h) Stores Issues/Reports.<br>(i) Air Safety Reports.<br>(j) Reports on Technical Delays and Incidents.<br>(k) Other sources: ETOPS, RVSM, CAT II/III.<br>6.5.4.3 In addition to the normal prime sources of information, due account should be taken of continuing airworthiness and safety information promulgated under Part-21<br>6.5.5 Display of information.<br>Collected information may be displayed graphically or in a tabular format or a combination of both. The rules governing any separation or discarding of information prior to incorporation into these formats should be stated. The format should be such that the identification of trends, specific highlights and related events would be readily apparent.<br>6.5.5.1 The above display of information should include provisions for “nil returns” to aid the examination of the total information.<br>6.5.5.2 Where “standards” or “alert levels” are included in the programme, the display of information should be oriented accordingly.<br>6.5.6 Examination, analysis and interpretation of the information.<br>The method employed for examining, analysing and interpreting the programme information should be explained.<br>6.5.6.1 Examination.<br>Methods of examination of information may be varied according to the content and quantity of information of individual programmes. These can range from examination of the initial indication of performance variations to formalised detailed procedures at specific periods, and the methods should be fully described in the programme documentation.<br>6.5.6.2 Analysis and Interpretation.<br>The procedures for analysis and interpretation of information should be such as to enable the performance of the items controlled by the programme to be measured; they should also facilitate recognition, diagnosis and recording of significant problems. The whole process should be such as to enable a critical assessment to be made of the effectiveness of the programme as a total activity. Such a process may involve:<br>(b) Comparisons of operational reliability with established or allocated standards<br>(in the initial period these could be obtained from in-service experience of similar equipment of aircraft types).<br>(c) Analysis and interpretation of trends.<br>(d) The evaluation of repetitive defects.<br>(e) Confidence testing of expected and achieved results.<br>(f) Studies of life-bands and survival characteristics.<br>(g) Reliability predictions.<br>(h) Other methods of assessment.<br>6.5.6.3 The range and depth of engineering analysis and interpretation should be related to the particular programme and to the facilities available. The following, at least, should be taken into account:<br>(a) Flight defects and reductions in operational reliability.<br>(b) Defects occurring on-line and at main base.<br>(c) Deterioration observed during routine maintenance.<br>(d) Workshop and overhaul facility findings.<br>(e) Modification evaluations.<br>(f) Sampling programmes.<br>(g) The adequacy of maintenance equipment and publications.<br>(h) The effectiveness of maintenance procedures.<br>(i) Staff training.<br>(j) Service bulletins, technical instructions, etc.<br>6.5.6.4 Where the M.A.Subpart G organisation relies upon contracted maintenance and/or overhaul facilities as an information input to the programme, the arrangements for availability and continuity of such information should be established and details should be included.<br>6.5.7 Corrective Actions.<br>6.5.7.1 The procedures and time scales both for implementing corrective actions and for monitoring the effects of corrective actions should be fully described. Corrective actions shall correct any reduction in reliability revealed by the programme and could take the form of:<br>(a) Changes to maintenance, operational procedures or techniques.<br>(b) Maintenance changes involving inspection frequency and content, function checks, overhaul requirements and time limits, which will<br>require amendment of the scheduled maintenance periods or tasks in the approved maintenance programme. This may include escalation or de-escalation of tasks, addition, modification or deletion of tasks.<br>(c) Amendments to approved manuals (e.g. maintenance manual, crew manual).<br>(d) Initiation of modifications.<br>(e) Special inspections of fleet campaigns.<br>(f) Spares provisioning.<br>(g) Staff training.<br>(h) Manpower and equipment planning.<br>Note: Some of the above corrective actions may need the competent authority’s approval before implementation.<br>6.5.7.2 The procedures for effecting changes to the maintenance programme should be described, and the associated documentation should include a planned completion date for each corrective action, where applicable.<br>6.5.8 Organisational Responsibilities.<br>The organisational structure and the department responsible for the administration of the programme should be stated. The chains of responsibility for individuals and departments (Engineering, Production, Quality, Operations etc.) in respect of the programme, together with the information and functions of any programme control committees (reliability group), should be defined. Participation of the competent authority should be stated. This information should be contained in the CAME or MOE as appropriate.<br>6.5.9 Presentation of information to the competent authority.<br>The following information should be submitted to the competent authority for approval as part of the reliability programme:<br>(a) The format and content of routine reports.<br>(b) The time scales for the production of reports together with their distribution.<br>(c) The format and content of reports supporting request for increases in periods between maintenance (escalation) and for amendments<br>to the approved maintenance programme. These reports should contain sufficient detailed information to enable the competent<br>authority to make its own evaluation where necessary.<br>6.5.10 Evaluation and review.<br>Each programme should describe the procedures and individual responsibilities in respect of continuous monitoring of the effectiveness of the programme as a whole.<br>The time periods and the procedures for both routine and non-routine reviews of maintenance control should be detailed (progressive, monthly, quarterly, or annual reviews, procedures following reliability “standards” or “alert levels” being exceeded, etc.).<br>6.5.10.1 Each Programme should contain procedures for monitoring and, as necessary, revising the reliability “standards” or “alert levels”. The organisational responsibilities for monitoring and revising the “standards” should be specified together with associated time scales.<br>6.5.10.2 Although not exclusive, the following list gives guidance on the criteria to be taken into account during the review.<br>(a) Utilisation (high/low/seasonal).<br>(b) Fleet commonality.<br>(c) Alert Level adjustment criteria.<br>(d) Adequacy of data.<br>(e) Reliability procedure audit.<br>(f) Staff training.<br>(g) Operational and maintenance procedures.<br>6.5.11 Approval of maintenance programme amendment<br>The competent authority may authorise the M.A.Subpart G organisation to implement in the maintenance programme changes arising from the reliability programme results prior to their formal approval by the authority when satisfied that ;<br>(a) the Reliability Programme monitors the content of the Maintenance Programme in a comprehensive manner, and<br>(b) the procedures associated with the functioning of the “Reliability Group” provide the assurance that appropriate control is exercised by<br>the Owner/operator over the internal validation of such changes.<br>6.6 Pooling Arrangements.<br>6.6.1 In some cases, in order that sufficient data may be analysed it may be desirable to “pool” data: i.e. collate data from a number of<br>M.A.Subpart G organisations of the same type of aircraft. For the analysis to be valid, the aircraft concerned, mode of operation, and maintenance procedures applied should be substantially the same:<br>variations in utilisation between two M.A.Subpart G organisations may more than anything, fundamentally corrupt the analysis. Although not exhaustive the following list gives guidance on the primary factors which need to be taken into account.<br>(a) Certification factors, such as: aircraft TCDS compliance (variant) / modification status, including SB compliance.<br>(b) Operational Factors, such as: operational environment / utilisation, e.g. low/high/seasonal etc / respective fleet size operating rules<br>applicable (e.g. ETOPS/RVSM/All Weather etc.) / operating procedures / MEL and MEL utilisation<br>(c) Maintenance factors, such as: aircraft age maintenance procedures; maintenance standards applicable; lubrication procedures and<br>programme; MPD revision or escalation applied or maintenance programme applicable.<br>6.6.2 Although it may not be necessary for all of the foregoing to be completely common, it is necessary for a substantial amount of commonality to prevail. Decision should be taken by the competent authority on a case by case basis.<br>6.6.3 In case of a short term lease agreement (less than 6 month) more flexibility against the para 6.6.1 criteria may be granted by the competent authority, so as to allow the owner/operator to operate the aircraft under the same programme during the lease agreement effectivity.<br>6.6.4 Changes by any one of the M.A.Subpart G organisation to the above, requires assessment in order that the pooling benefits can be maintained. Where an M.A.Subpart G organisation wishes to pool data in this way, the approval of the competent authority should be sought<br>prior to any formal agreement being signed between M.A.Subpart G organisations.<br>6.6.5 Whereas this paragraph 6.6 is intended to address the pooling of data directly between M.A.Subpart G organisations, it is acceptable that<br>the M.A.Subpart G organisation participates in a reliability programme managed by the aircraft manufacturer, when the competent authority is satisfied that the manufacturer manages a reliability programme which complies with the intent of this paragraph.

M.A.303 Airworthiness directives - (CAME Part 1. 4)

  • Any applicable airworthiness directive must be carried out within the requirements of that airworthiness directive, unless otherwise specified by the Agency.

M.A.304 Data for modifications and repairs - (CAME Part 1. 6, 1.7, 1.8)

  • Damage shall be assessed and modifications and repairs carried out using as appropriate:<br>(a) data approved by the Agency; or<br>(b) data approved by a Part-21 design organisation; or<br>(c) data contained in the certification specifications referred to in point 21A.90B or 21A.431B of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003.

  • AMC M.A.304 Data for modifications and repairs<br>A person or organisation repairing an aircraft or component should assess the damage against published approved repair data and the action to be taken if the damage is beyond the limits or outside the scope of such data. This could involve any one or more of the following options; repair by replacement of damaged parts, requesting technical support from the type certificate holder or from an organisation approved in accordance with Part-21 and finally agency approval of the particular repair data.

M.A.305 Aircraft continuing airworthiness record system - (CAME Part 1.1, 1.3.1)

  • (a) At the completion of any maintenance, the certificate of release to<br>service required by point M.A.801 or point 145.A.50 shall be entered in the aircraft continuing airworthiness records. Each entry shall be made as soon as practicable but in no case more than 30 days after the day of the maintenance action.

  • (b) The aircraft continuing airworthiness records shall consist of - (CAME Part 1.3.4):<br>1. an aircraft logbook, engine logbook(s) or engine module log cards, propeller logbook(s) and log cards for any service life limited component as appropriate, and,<br>2. when required in point M.A.306 for commercial air transport or by the Member State for commercial operations other than commercial air transport, the operator’s technical log.’

  • (c) The aircraft type and registration mark, the date, together with total flight time and/or flight cycles and/or landings, as appropriate, shall be entered in the aircraft logbooks.

  • (d) The aircraft continuing airworthiness records shall contain the current - (CAME Part 1.3.2):<br>1. status of airworthiness directives and measures mandated by the competent authority in immediate reaction to a safety problem; - (CAME Part 1. 4)<br>2. status of modifications and repairs;<br>3. status of compliance with maintenance programme;<br>4. status of service life limited components;<br>5. mass and balance report;<br>6. list of deferred maintenance.

  • AMC M.A.305 (d) Aircraft continuing airworthiness record system<br>The current status of AD should identify the applicable AD including revision or amendment numbers. Where an AD is generally applicable to the aircraft or component type but is not applicable to the particular aircraft or component, then this should be identified. The AD status includes the date when the AD was accomplished, and where the AD is controlled by flight hours or flight cycles it should include the aircraft or engine or component total flight hours or cycles, as appropriate. For repetitive ADs, only the last application should be recorded in the AD status. The status should also specify which part of a multi-part directive has been accomplished and the method, where a choice is available in the AD.<br>The status of current modification and repairs means a list of embodied modification and repairs together with the substantiating data supporting compliance with the airworthiness requirements. This can be in the form of a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC), SB, Structural Repair Manual (SRM) or similar approved document.<br>The substantiating data may include:<br>(a) ​compliance programme; and,<br>(b) ​master drawing or drawing list, production drawings, and installation instructions; and,<br>(c) ​engineering reports (static strength, fatigue, damage tolerance, fault analysis, etc.);<br>and,<br>(d) ​ground and flight test programme and results; and,<br>(e) ​mass and balance change data; and,<br>(f)​ maintenance and repair manual supplements; and,<br>(g) ​maintenance programme changes and instructions for continuing airworthiness;<br>​and,<br>(h)​ aircraft flight manual supplement.<br>Some gas turbine engines are assembled from modules and a true total time in service for a total engine is not kept. When owners and operators wish to take advantage of the modular design, then total time in service and maintenance records for each module is to be maintained. The continuing airworthiness records as specified are to be kept with the module and should show compliance with any mandatory requirements pertaining to that module.

  • AMC M.A.305 (d) (4) and AMC M.A.305 (h) Aircraft continuing airworthiness record system<br>The term ‘service life-limited components’ embraces: (i) components subject to a certified life limit after which the components should be retired, and (ii) components subject to a service life limit after which the components should undergo maintenance to restore their serviceability.<br>The current status of service life-limited aircraft components should indicate:<br>(i) for components subject to a certified life limit: the component life limitation, total number of hours, accumulated cycles or calendar time and the number of hours/cycles/time remaining before the required retirement time of the component is reached;<br>(ii) for components subject to a service life limit: the component service life limit, the hours, cycles or calendar time since the component has been restored back to their service life and the remaining service (hours, cycles, calendar time) life before the components need to undergo<br>maintenance.<br>Any action that alters the components’ life limit (certified or service) or changes the parameter of the life limit (certified or service) should be recorded. When the determination of the remaining life requires knowledge of the different types of aircraft/engine on which the component has previously been installed, the status of all service-life limited aircraft components should additionally include a full installation history indicating the number of hours, cycles or calendar time relevant to each installation on these different types of aircraft/engine. The indication of the type of aircraft/engine should be sufficiently detailed with regard to the required determination of remaining life.<br>Recommendations from the type certificate holder on the procedures to record the remaining life may be considered.

  • (e) In addition to the authorised release document, EASA Form 1 or equivalent, the following information relevant to any component installed (engine, propeller, engine module or service life-limited component) shall be entered in the appropriate engine or propeller logbook, engine module or service life limited component log card:<br>1. identification of the component; and<br>2. the type, serial number and registration, as appropriate, of the aircraft, engine, propeller, engine module or service life-limited component to which the particular component has been fitted, along with the reference to the installation and removal of the component; and<br>3. the date together with the component’s accumulated total flight time and/or flight cycles and/or landings and/or calendar time, as appropriate; and<br>4. the current paragraph (d) information applicable to the component.

  • (f) The person responsible for the management of continuing airworthiness tasks pursuant to M.A. Subpart B, shall control the records as detailed in this paragraph and present the records to the competent authority upon request.

  • (g) All entries made in the aircraft continuing airworthiness records shall be clear and accurate. When it is necessary to correct an entry, the correction shall be made in a manner that clearly shows the original entry.

  • (h) An owner or operator shall ensure that a system has been established to keep the following records for the periods specified<br>- (CAME Part 1.3.2, 1.3.3):<br>1. all detailed maintenance records in respect of the aircraft and any service life-limited component fitted thereto, until such time as the information contained therein is superseded by new information equivalent in scope and detail but not less than 36 months after the aircraft or component has been released to service; and<br>2. the total time in service (hours, calendar time, cycles and landings) of the aircraft and all service lifelimited components, at least 12 months after the aircraft or component has been permanently withdrawn from service; and<br>3. the time in service (hours, calendar time, cycles and landings) as appropriate, since last scheduled maintenance of the component subjected to a service life limit, at least until the component scheduled maintenance has been superseded by another scheduled maintenance of equivalent work scope and detail; and<br>4. the current status of compliance with maintenance programme such that compliance with the approved aircraft maintenance programme can be established, at least until the aircraft or component scheduled maintenance has been superseded by other scheduled maintenance of equivalent work scope and detail; and<br>5. the current status of airworthiness directives applicable to the aircraft and components, at least 12 months after the aircraft or component has been permanently withdrawn from service; and<br>6. details of current modifications and repairs to the aircraft, engine(s), propeller(s) and any other component vital to flight safety, at least 12 months after they have been permanently withdrawn from service.

  • AMC M.A.305 (h) Aircraft continuing airworthiness record system<br>When an owner/operator arranges for the relevant maintenance organisation to retain copies of the continuing airworthiness records on their behalf, the owner/operator will continue to be responsible for the retention of records. If they cease to be the owner/operator of the aircraft, they also remain responsible for transferring the records to any other person who becomes the owner/operator of the aircraft.<br>Keeping continuing airworthiness records in a form acceptable to the competent authority normally means in paper form or on a computer database or a combination of both methods. Records stored in microfilm or optical disc form are also acceptable. All records should remain legible throughout the required retention period.<br>Paper systems should use robust material, which can withstand normal handling and filing. Computer systems should have at least one backup system, which should be updated at least within 24 hours of any maintenance. Each terminal is required to contain programme safeguards against the ability of unauthorised personnel to alter the database.<br>Continuing airworthiness records should be stored in a safe way with regard to damage, alteration and theft. Computer backup discs, tapes etc., should be stored in a different location from that containing the current working discs, tapes, etc. and in a safe environment. Reconstruction of lost or destroyed records can be done by reference to other records which reflect the time in service, research of records maintained by repair facilities and reference to records maintained by individual mechanics etc. When these things have been done and the record is still incomplete, the owner/operator may make a statement in the new record describing the loss and establishing the time in service based on the research and the best estimate of time in service. The reconstructed records should be submitted to the competent authority for acceptance. The competent authority may require the performance of additional maintenance if not satisfied with the reconstructed records.

  • AMC M.A.305 (h) 6- Aircraft continuing airworthiness record system<br>For the purpose of this paragraph, a “component vital to flight safety” means a component that includes certified life limited parts or is subject to airworthiness limitations or a major component such as, undercarriage or flight controls.

M.A.306 Operator's technical log system - (CAME Part 1.1, 1.1.2, 1.1.2.1, )

  • (a) In the case of commercial air transport, in addition to the requirements of M.A.305, an operator shall use an aircraft technical log system containing the following information for each aircraft:<br>1. information about each flight, necessary to ensure continued flight safety, and;<br>2. the current aircraft certificate of release to service, and;<br>3. the current maintenance statement giving the aircraft maintenance status of what scheduled and out of phase maintenance is next due except that the competent authority may agree to the maintenance statement being kept elsewhere, and;<br>4. all outstanding deferred defects rectifications that affect the operation of the aircraft, and;<br>5. any necessary guidance instructions on maintenance support arrangements.

  • AMC M.A.306 (a) Operators technical log system<br>For commercial air transport the operator’s aircraft technical log is a system for recording defects and malfunctions during the aircraft operation and for recording details of all maintenance carried out on an aircraft between scheduled base maintenance visits. In addition, it is used for recording flight safety and maintenance information the operating crew need to know.<br>Cabin or galley defects and malfunctions that affect the safe operation of the aircraft or the safety of its occupants are regarded as forming part of the aircraft log book where recorded by another means.<br>The operator’s aircraft technical log system may range from a simple single section document to a complex system containing many sections but in all cases it should include the information specified for the example used here which happens to use a 5 section document / computer system:<br>Section 1 should contain details of the registered name and address of the operator the aircraft type and the complete international registration marks of the aircraft.<br>Section 2 should contain details of when the next scheduled maintenance is due, including, if relevant any out of phase component changes due before the next maintenance check. In addition this section should contain the current certificate of release to service (CRS), for the complete aircraft, issued normally at the end of the last maintenance check.<br>NOTE: The flight crew do not need to receive such details if the next scheduled maintenance is controlled by other means acceptable to the competent authority.<br>Section 3 should contain details of all information considered necessary to ensure continued flight safety. Such information includes:<br>i. the aircraft type and registration mark.<br>ii. the date and place of take-off and landing.<br>iii. the times at which the aircraft took off and landed.<br>iv. the running total of flying hours, such that the hours to the next schedule maintenance can be determined. The flight crew does not need to receive such details if the next scheduled maintenance is controlled by other means acceptable to the competent authority.<br>v. details of any failure, defect or malfunction to the aircraft affecting airworthiness or safe operation of the aircraft including emergency systems, and any failure, defect or malfunctions in the cabin or galleys that affect the safe operation of the aircraft or the safety of its occupants that are known to the commander. Provision should be made for the commander to date and sign such entries, including, where appropriate, the nil defect state for continuity of the record. Provision should be made for a CRS following rectification of a defect or any deferred defect or maintenance check carried out. Such a certificate appearing on each page of this section should readily identify the defect(s) to which it relates or the particular maintenance check as appropriate.<br>It is acceptable to use an alternate abbreviated certificate of release to service consisting of the statement ‘Part-145 release to service’ instead of the full certification statement specified in AMC 145.A.50(b) paragraph 1. When the alternate abbreviated certificate of release to service is used, the introductory section of the technical log should include an example of the full certification statement from AMC 145.A.50(b) paragraph 1.<br>vi. the quantity of fuel and oil uplifted and the quantity of fuel available in each tank, or combination of tanks, at the beginning and end of each flight; provision to show, in the same units of quantity, both the amount of fuel planned to be uplifted and the amount of fuel actually uplifted; provision for the time when ground de-icing and/or anti-icing was started and the type of fluid applied, including mixture ratio fluid/water and any other information required by the operator's procedures in order to allow the assessment on whether inspections for and/or elimination of de-icing/anti- icing fluid residues that could endanger flight safety are required.<br>vii. thepre-flightinspectionsignature.<br>In addition to the above it may be necessary to record the following supplementary information:<br> the time spent in particular engine power ranges where use of such engine power affects the life of the engine or engine module.<br> the number of landings where landings affect the life of an aircraft or aircraft component.<br> flight cycles or flight pressure cycles where such cycles affect the life of an aircraft or aircraft component.<br>NOTE 1: Where Section 3 is of the multi-sector ‘part removable’ type then such ‘part removable’ sections should contain all of the foregoing information where appropriate.<br>NOTE 2: Section 3 should be designed so that one copy of each page may remain on the aircraft and one copy may be retained on the ground until completion of the flight to which it relates.<br>NOTE 3: Section 3 lay-out should be divided to show clearly what is required to be completed after flight and what is required to be completed in preparation for the next flight.<br>Section 4 should contain details of all deferred defects that affect or may affect the safe operation of the aircraft and should therefore be known to the aircraft commander. Each page of this section should be pre-printed with the operator’s name and page serial number and make provision for recording the following:<br>i. a cross reference for each deferred defect such that the original defect can be identified in the particular section 3 sector record page.<br>ii. the original date of occurrence of the defect deferred.<br>iii. brief details of the defect.<br>iv. details of the eventual rectification carried out and its CRS or a clear cross-reference back to the document that contains details of the eventual rectification.<br>Section 5 should contain any necessary maintenance support information that the aircraft commander needs to know. Such information would include data on how to contact maintenance engineering if problems arise whilst operating the routes etc.

  • (b) The aircraft technical log system and any subsequent amendment shall be approved by the competent authority.

  • AMC M.A.306 (b) Operators technical log system<br>The aircraft technical log system can be either a paper or computer system or any combination of both methods acceptable to the competent authority.<br>In case of a computer system, it should contain programme safeguards against the ability of unauthorised personnel to alter the database.

  • (c) An operator shall ensure that the aircraft technical log is retained for 36 months after the date of the last entry.

M.A.307 Transfer of aircraft continuing airworthiness records - (CAME Part 1. 6)

  • (a) The owner or operator shall ensure when an aircraft is permanently<br>transferred from one owner or operator to another that the M.A.305 continuing airworthiness records and, if applicable, M.A.306 operator's technical log are also transferred. - (CAME Part 1.3.4)

  • AMC M.A.307 (a) Transfer of aircraft continuing airworthiness records<br>Where an owner/operator terminates his operation, all retained continuing airworthiness records should be passed on to the new owner/operator or stored.<br>A “permanent transfer” does not generally include the dry lease-out of an aircraft when the duration of the lease agreement is less than 6 months. However the competent authority should be satisfied that all continuing airworthiness records necessary for the duration of the lease agreement are transferred to the lessee or made accessible to them.

  • (b) The owner shall ensure, when he contracts the continuing airworthiness management tasks to a continuing airworthiness management organisation, that the M.A.305 continuing airworthiness records are transferred to the organisation.

  • (c) The time periods prescribed for the retention of records shall continue to apply to the new owner, operator or continuing airworthiness management organisation.

SUBPART D - MAINTENANCE STANDARDS

M.A.401 Maintenance data

  • (a) The person or organisation maintaining an aircraft shall have access to and use only applicable current maintenance data in the performance of maintenance including modifications and repairs.

  • (b) For the purposes of this Part, applicable maintenance data is:<br>1. any applicable requirement, procedure, standard or information issued by the competent authority or the Agency,<br>2. any applicable airworthiness directive,<br>3. applicable instructions for continuing airworthiness, issued by type certificate holders, supplementary type certificate holders and any other organisation that publishes such data in accordance with Part 21.<br>4. any applicable data issued in accordance with 145.A.45(d).

  • AMC M.A.401 (b) Maintenance data<br>1. Except as specified in sub-paragraph 2, each person or organisation performing aircraft maintenance should have access to and use:<br>(a) all maintenance related Parts and associated AMC’s, together with the maintenance related guidance material,<br>(b) all applicable maintenance requirements and notices such as competent authority standards and specifications that have not been<br>superseded by a requirement, procedure or directive,<br>(c) all applicable airworthiness directives,<br>(d) the appropriate sections of the aircraft maintenance programme, aircraft maintenance manual, repair manual, supplementary structural inspection document, corrosion control document, service bulletins, service sheets modification leaflets, non destructive inspection manual, parts catalogue, type certificate data sheets as required for the work undertaken and any other specific document issued by the type certificate or supplementary type certificate holder’s maintenance data, except that in the case of operator or customer provided maintenance data it is not necessary to hold such provided data when the work order is completed.<br>2. In addition to sub-paragraph 1, for components each organisation performing aircraft maintenance should hold and use the appropriate sections of the vendor maintenance and repair manual, service bulletins and service letters plus any document issued by the type certificate holder as maintenance data on whose product the component may be fitted when applicable, except that in the case of operator or customer provided maintenance data it is not necessary to hold such provided data when the work order is completed.

  • (c) The person or organisation maintaining an aircraft shall ensure that all applicable maintenance data is current and readily available for use when required. The person or organisation shall establish a work card or worksheet system to be used and shall either transcribe accurately the maintenance data onto such work cards or worksheets or make precise reference to the particular maintenance task or tasks contained<br>in such maintenance data.

  • AMC M.A.401(c) Maintenance data<br>1. Data being made available to personnel maintaining aircraft means that the data should be available in close proximity to the aircraft or component being maintained, for mechanics and certifying staff to perform maintenance.<br>2. Where computer systems are used, the number of computer terminals should be sufficient in relation to the size of the work programme to enable easy access, unless the computer system can produce paper copies. Where microfilm or microfiche readers/printers are used, a similar requirement is applicable.<br>3. Maintenance tasks should be transcribed onto the work cards or worksheets and subdivided into clear stages to ensure a record of the accomplishment of the maintenance task. Of particular importance is the need to differentiate and specify, when relevant, disassembly, accomplishment of task, reassembly and testing. In the case of a lengthy maintenance task involving a succession of personnel to complete such task, it may be necessary to use supplementary work cards or worksheets to indicate what was actually accomplished by each individual person. A worksheet or work card system should refer to particular maintenance tasks.<br>4.​The workcard/worksheet system may take the form of, but is not limited to, the following:<br>• a format where the mechanic writes the defect and the maintenance action taken together with information of the maintenance data used, including its revision status,<br>• an aircraft log book that contains the reports of defects and the actions taken by authorised personnel together with information of the maintenance data used, including its revision status,<br>• for maintenance checks, the checklist issued by the manufacturer (i.e., 100H checklist, Revision 5, Items 1 through 95).<br>5.​Maintenance data should be kept up to date by:<br>• subscribing to the applicable amendment scheme,<br>• checking that all amendments are being received,<br>• monitoring the amendment status of all data.<br>

M.A.402 Performance of maintenance - (CAME Part 2.2)

  • (a) All maintenance shall be performed by qualified personnel, following the methods, techniques, standards and instructions specified in the M.A.401 maintenance data. Furthermore, an independent inspection shall be carried out after any flight safety sensitive maintenance task unless otherwise specified by Part-145 or agreed by the competent authority. - (CAME Part 1.2.1)

  • AMC M.A.402 (a) Performance of maintenance<br>1. When working outside the scope of an approved maintenance organisation personnel not authorised to issue a CRS should work under the supervision of certifying personnel. They may only perform maintenance that their supervisor is authorised to release, if the supervisor personally observes the work being carried out to the extent necessary to ensure that it is being done properly and if the supervisor is readily available, in person, for consultation. In this case licensed engineers should ensure that each person maintaining an aircraft or component has had appropriate training or relevant previous experience and is capable of performing the task required, and that personnel who carry out specialised tasks such as welding are qualified in accordance with an officially recognised standard.<br>2. In the case of limited Pilot-owner maintenance as specified in M.A.803, any person maintaining an aircraft which they own or jointly own, provided they hold a valid pilot licence with the appropriate type or class rating, may perform the limited Pilot-owner maintenance tasks in accordance with Appendix VIII of Annex I (Part-M) of Regulation (EC) No 2042/2003.<br>3. The general maintenance and inspection standards applied to individual maintenance tasks should meet the recommended standards and practices of the organisation responsible for the type design which are normally published in the maintenance manuals.<br>In the absence of maintenance and inspection standards published by the organisation responsible for the type design maintenance personnel should refer to the relevant aircraft airworthiness standards and procedures published or used as guidance by the Agency or the competent authority. The maintenance standards used should contain methods, techniques and practices acceptable to the Agency or competent authority for the maintenance of aircraft and its components.<br>4. Independent inspections<br>4.1 The manufacturer’s instructions for continued airworthiness should be followed when determining the need for an independent inspection.<br>4.2 In the absence of maintenance and inspection standards published by organisation responsible for the type design, maintenance tasks that<br>involve the assembly or any disturbance of a control system that, if errors occurred, could result in a failure, malfunction, or defect endangering the safe operation of the aircraft should be considered as flight safety sensitive maintenance tasks needing an independent inspection. A control system is an aircraft system by which the flight path, attitude, or propulsive force of the aircraft is changed, including the flight, engine and propeller controls, the related system controls and the associated operating mechanisms.<br>4.3 Independent inspections should be carried out by at least two persons, to ensure correct assembly, locking and sense of operation. A technical record of the inspections should contain the signatures of both persons before the relevant CRS is issued.<br>4.3.1 An independent inspection is an inspection first made by an authorised person signing the maintenance release who assumes full responsibility for the satisfactory completion of the work, before being subsequently inspected by a second independent competent person who attests to the satisfactory completion of the work recorded and that no deficiencies have been found.<br>4.3.2 The second independent competent person is not issuing a maintenance release therefore is not required to hold certification privileges. However they should be suitably qualified to carry out the inspection.<br>4.4 When work is being done under the control of an approved maintenance organisation the organisation should have procedures to demonstrate that the signatories have been trained and have gained experience on the specific control systems being inspected.<br>4.5. When work is being undertaken by an independent M.A.801 (b) 2 certifying staff, the qualifications and experience of the second independent competent person should be directly assessed by the person certifying for the maintenance, taking into account the individual’s training and experience. It should not be acceptable for the certifying staff signing the release to show the person performing the independent inspection how to perform the inspection at the time the work is completed.<br>4.6 In summary the following maintenance tasks should primarily be considered when inspecting aircraft control systems that have been disturbed:<br> installation, rigging and adjustment of flight controls.<br> installation of aircraft engines, propellers and rotors.<br> overhaul, calibration or rigging of components such as engines, propellers, transmissions and gearboxes. Consideration should also be given to:<br> previous experience of maintenance errors, depending on the consequences of the failure.<br> information arising from an ‘occurrence reporting system’<br>4.7 When checking control systems that have undergone maintenance the person signing the maintenance release and the person performing the independent check should consider the following points independently:<br> all those parts of the system that have actually been disconnected or disturbed should be inspected for correct assembly and locking.<br> the system as a whole should be inspected for full and free movement over the complete range.<br> cables should be tensioned correctly with adequate clearance at secondary stops.<br> the operation of the control system as a whole should be observed to ensure that the controls are operating in the correct sense.<br> if the control system is duplicated to provide redundancy, each system should be checked separately.<br> if different control systems are interconnected so that they affect each other, all interactions should be checked through the full range<br>of the applicable controls.

  • (b) All maintenance shall be performed using the tools, equipment and material specified in the M.A.401 maintenance data unless otherwise specified by Part-145. Where necessary, tools and equipment shall be controlled and calibrated to an officially recognised standard.

  • AMC M.A.402 (b) Performance of maintenance<br>When performing maintenance, personnel are required to use the tools, equipment and test apparatus necessary to ensure completion of work in accordance with accepted maintenance and inspection standards. Inspection, service or calibration on a regular basis should be in accordance with the equipment manufacturers' instructions. All tools requiring calibration should be traceable to an acceptable standard.<br>If the organisation responsible for the type design involved recommends special equipment or test apparatus, personnel should use the recommended equipment or apparatus or equivalent equipment accepted by the competent authority.<br>All work should be performed using materials of such quality and in a manner, that the condition of the aircraft or its components after maintenance will be at least equal to its original or modified condition (with regard to aerodynamic function, structural strength, resistance to vibration, deterioration and any other qualities affecting airworthiness).<br>In this context officially recognised standard means those standards established or published by an official body whether having legal personality or not, which are widely recognised by the air transport sector as constituting good practice.

  • (c) The area in which maintenance is carried out shall be well organised and clean in respect of dirt and contamination.

  • (d) All maintenance shall be performed within any environmental limitations specified in the M.A.401 maintenance data.

  • AMC M.A.402 (d) Performance of maintenance<br>The working environment should be appropriate for the maintenance task being performed such that the effectiveness of personnel is not impaired.<br>(a) Temperature should be maintained such that personnel can perform the required tasks without undue discomfort.<br>(b) Airborne contamination (e.g. dust, precipitation, paint particles, filings) should be kept to a minimum to ensure aircraft/components<br>surfaces are not contaminated, if this is not possible all susceptible systems should be sealed until acceptable conditions are re-established.<br>(c) Lighting should be adequate to ensure each inspection and maintenance task can be performed effectively.<br>(d) Noise levels should not be allowed to rise to the level of distraction for inspection staff or if this is not possible inspection staff should be provided with personnel equipment to reduce excessive noise.

  • (e) In case of inclement weather or lengthy maintenance, proper facilities shall be used.

  • AMC M.A.402 (e) Performance of maintenance<br>Facilities should be provided appropriate for all planned maintenance. This may require aircraft hangars that are both available and large enough for the planned maintenance.<br>Aircraft component workshops should be large enough to accommodate the components that are planned to be maintained.<br>Protection from inclement weather means the hangar or component workshop structures should be to a standard that prevents the ingress of rain, hail, ice, snow, wind and dust etc.

  • (f) After completion of all maintenance a general verification must be carried out to ensure the aircraft or component is clear of all tools, equipment and any other extraneous parts and material, and that all access panels removed have been refitted.

M.A.403 Aircraft defects - (CAME Part 2.2)

  • (a) Any aircraft defect that hazards seriously the flight safety shall be<br>rectified before further flight.

  • (b) Only the authorised certifying staff, according to points M.A.801(b)1,<br>M.A.801(b)2, M.A.801(c), M.A.801(d) or Annex II (Part-145) can decide, using M.A.401 maintenance data, whether an aircraft defect hazards seriously the flight safety and therefore decide when and which rectification action shall be taken before further flight and which defect rectification can be deferred. However, this does not apply when - (CAME Part 1. 8):<br>1. the approved minimum equipment list as mandated by the competent authority is used by the pilot; or,<br>2. aircraft defects are defined as being acceptable by the competent authority.

  • AMC M.A.403 (b) Aircraft defects<br>An assessment of both the cause and any potentially hazardous effect of any defect or combination of defects that could affect flight safety should be made in order to initiate any necessary further investigation and analysis necessary to identify the root cause of the defect.

  • (c) Any aircraft defect that would not hazard seriously the flight safety shall be rectified as soon as practicable, after the date the aircraft defect was first identified and within any limits specified in the maintenance data.

  • (d) Any defect not rectified before flight shall be recorded in the M.A.305 aircraft maintenance record system or M.A.306 operator's technical log system as applicable. - (CAME Part 1. 8)

  • AMC M.A.403 (d) Aircraft defects<br>All deferred defects should be made known to the pilot/flight crew, whenever possible, prior to their arrival at the aircraft.<br>Deferred defects should be transferred on to worksheets at the next appropriate maintenance check, and any deferred defect which is not rectified during the maintenance check, should be re-entered on to a new deferred defect record sheet. The original date of the defect should be retained.<br>The necessary components or parts needed for the rectification of defects should be made available or ordered on a priority basis, and fitted at the earliest opportunity.

SUBPART E - COMPONENTS

M.A.501 Installation

  • (a) No component may be fitted unless it is in a satisfactory condition, has been appropriately released to service on an EASA Form 1 or equivalent and is marked in accordance with Part 21 Subpart Q, unless otherwise specified in Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003, Annex II (Part-145) or Subpart F, Section A of Annex I to this Regulation.

  • AMC M.A.501 (a) - Installation<br>1. To ensure a component is in a satisfactory condition, the person referred to under M.A.801 or the approved maintenance organisation should perform checks and verifications.<br>2. Performance of above checks and verifications should take place before the component is installed on the aircraft.<br>3. The following list, though not exhaustive, contains typical checks to be performed:<br>(a) verify the general condition of components and their packaging in relation to damages that could affect the integrity of the components;<br>(b) verify that the shelf life of the component has not expired;<br>(c) verify that items are received in the appropriate package in respect of the type of component: e.g. correct ATA 300 or electrostatic sensitive<br>devices packaging, when necessary;<br>(d) verify that component has all plugs and caps appropriately installed to prevent damage or internal contamination. Tape should not be used to cover electrical connections or fluid fittings/openings because adhesive residues can insulate electrical connections and contaminate hydraulic or fuel units.<br>4. The purpose of the EASA Form 1 (see also Part-M Appendix II) is to release components after manufacture and to release maintenance work carried out on such components under the approval of a competent authority and to allow components removed from one aircraft/component to be fitted to another aircraft/ component.<br>5. For the purpose of Part-M, a document equivalent to an EASA Form 1 may be:<br>(a) a release document issued by an organisation under the terms of a bilateral agreement signed by the European Community; (b) a release document issued by an organisation approved under the terms of a JAA maintenance bilateral agreement until superseded by the corresponding agreement signed by the European Community;<br>(c) a JAA Form One issued prior to 28 November 2004 by a JAR 145 organisation approved by a JAA Full Member State;<br>(d) in the case of new aircraft components that were released from manufacturing prior to the Part--21 compliance date the component should be accompanied by a JAA Form One issued by a JAR 21 organisation approved by a JAA Full Member Authority and within the JAA mutual recognition system;<br>(e) a JAA Form One issued prior to 28 September 2005 by a production organisation approved by a competent authority in accordance with its national regulations;<br>(f) a JAA Form One issued prior to 28 September 2008 by a maintenance organisation approved by a competent authority in accordance with its national regulations;<br>(g) a release document acceptable to a competent authority according to the provisions of a bilateral agreement between the competent authority and a third country until superseded by the corresponding agreement signed by the European Community. This provision is valid provided the above agreements between the competent authority and a third country are notified to the Commission and to the other competent authorities in accordance with Article 9 of Regulation (EC) No 1592/2002.<br>(h) a release document issued under the conditions described in Article 4, point 4 of Regulation (EC) No 2042/2003;<br>(i) paragraphs (f) and (g) do not apply to the Part-145 maintenance environment.<br>6. Any item in storage without an EASA Form 1 or equivalent cannot be installed on aircraft registered in a Member State unless an EASA Form 1 is issued for such item by an appropriately approved maintenance organisation in accordance with AMC M.A.613 (a)

  • (b) Prior to installation of a component on an aircraft the person or approved maintenance organisation shall ensure that the particular component is eligible to be fitted when different modification and/or airworthiness directive configurations may be applicable.

  • AMC M.A.501 (b) – Installation<br>1. The EASA Form 1 identifies the airworthiness status of an aircraft component. Block 12 "Remarks" on the EASA Form 1 in some cases contains vital airworthiness related information (see also Part-M Appendix II) which may need appropriate and necessary actions.<br>2. The fitment of replacement components should only take place when the person referred to in M.A.801 or the M.A. Subpart F or Part-145 maintenance organisation is satisfied that such components meet required standards in respect of manufacture or maintenance, as appropriate.<br>3. The person referred to under M.A.801 or the M.A. Subpart F or Part-145 approved maintenance organisation should be satisfied that the component in question meets the approved data/standard, such as the required design and modification standards. This may be accomplished by reference to the (S)TC holder or manufacturer's parts catalogue or other approved data (i.e. Service Bulletin). Care should also be taken in ensuring compliance with applicable ADs and the status of any service life limited parts fitted to the aircraft component.

  • (c) Standard parts shall only be fitted to an aircraft or a component when the maintenance data specifies the particular standard part. Standard parts shall only be fitted when accompanied by evidence of conformity traceable to the applicable standard.

  • AMC M.A.501(c) – Installation<br>1. Standard parts are:<br>a. parts manufactured in complete compliance with an established industry, Agency, competent authority or other Government specification which includes design, manufacturing, test and acceptance criteria, and uniform identification requirements. The specification should include all information necessary to produce and verify conformity of the part. It should be published so that any party may manufacture the part. Examples of specifications are National Aerospace Standards (NAS), Army-Navy Aeronautical Standard (AN), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), SAE Sematec, Joint Electron Device Engineering Council, Joint Electron Tube Engineering Council, and American National Standards Institute (ANSI), EN Specifications etc...<br>b. For sailplanes and powered sailplanes, non-required instruments and/or equipment certified under the provision of CS 22.1301(b), if those instruments or equipment, when installed, functioning, functioning improperly or not functioning at all, do not in itself, or by its effect upon the sailplane and its operation, constitute a safety hazard.<br>“Required” in the term “non-required” as used above means required by the applicable airworthiness code (CS 22.1303, 22.1305 and 22.1307) or required by the relevant operating regulations and the applicable Rules of the Air or as required by Air Traffic Management (e.g. a transponder in certain controlled airspace).<br>Examples of equipment which can be considered standard parts are electrical variometers, bank/slip indicators ball type, total energy probes, capacity bottles (for variometers), final glide calculators, navigation computers, data logger / barograph /turnpoint camera, bug-wipers and anti-collision systems.<br>Equipment which must be approved in accordance to the airworthiness code shall comply with the applicable ETSO or equivalent and is not considered a standard part (e.g. oxygen equipment).<br>2. To designate a part as a standard part the TC holder may issue a standard parts manual accepted by the competent authority of original TC holder or may make reference in the parts catalogue to a national/international specification (such as a standard diode/capacitor etc) not being an aviation only specification for the particular part.<br>3. Documentation accompanying standard parts should clearly relate to the particular parts and contain a conformity statement plus both the manufacturing and supplier source. Some material is subject to special conditions such as storage condition or life limitation etc. and this should be included on the documentation and / or material packaging.<br>4. An EASA Form 1 or equivalent is not normally issued and therefore none should be expected.

  • (d) Material being either raw material or consumable material shall only be used on an aircraft or a component when the aircraft or component manufacturer states so in relevant maintenance data or as specified in Part-145. Such material shall only be used when the material meets the required specification and has appropriate traceability. All material must be accompanied by documentation clearly relating to the particular material and containing a conformity to specification statement plus both the manufacturing and supplier source.

  • AMC M.A.501 (d) – Installation<br>1. Consumable material is any material which is only used once, such as lubricants, cements, compounds, paints, chemicals dyes and sealants etc.<br>2. Raw material is any material that requires further work to make it into a component part of the aircraft such as metals, plastics, wood, fabric etc.<br>3. Material both raw and consumable should only be accepted when satisfied that it is to the required specification. To be satisfied, the material and or its packaging should be marked with the specification and where appropriate the batch number.<br>4. Documentation accompanying all material should clearly relate to the particular material and contain a conformity statement plus both the manufacturing and supplier source. Some material is subject to special conditions such as storage condition or life limitation etc. and this should be included on the documentation and / or material packaging.<br>5. EASA form 1 or equivalent should not be issued for such material and therefore none should be expected. The material specification is normally identified in the (S)TC holder’s data except in the case where the Agency or the competent authority has agreed otherwise.<br>6. Items purchased in batches (fasteners etc.) should be supplied in a package. The packaging should state the applicable specification/standard, P/N, batch number and the quantity of the items. The documentation accompanying the material should contain the applicable specification/standard, P/N, batch number, supplied quantity, and the manufacturing sources. If the material is acquired from different batches, acceptance documentation for each batch should be supplied.

M.A.502 Component maintenance

  • AMC M.A.502 Component maintenance<br>Component removal from and installation on an aircraft is considered to be aircraft maintenance and not component maintenance. As a consequence, M.A.502 requirements do not apply to this case.

  • (a) Except for components referred to in point 21A.307(c) of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003, the maintenance of components shall be performed by maintenance organisations appropriately approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M) or with Annex II (Part-145).

  • (b) By derogation from paragraph (a), maintenance of a component in accordance with aircraft maintenance data or, if agreed by the competent authority, in accordance with component maintenance data, may be performed by an A rated organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M) or with Annex II (Part- 145) as well as by certifying staff referred to in point M.A.801(b)2 only whilst such components are fitted to the aircraft. Nevertheless, such organisation or certifying staff may temporarily remove this component for maintenance, in order to improve access to the component, except when such removal generates the need for additional maintenance not eligible for the provisions of this paragraph. Component maintenance performed in accordance with this paragraph is not eligible for the issuance of an EASA Form 1 and shall be subject to the aircraft release requirements provided for in point M.A.801.

  • AMC M.A.502(b) and (c) Component maintenance<br>M.A.502(b) and (c) allow the performance of certain component maintenance, in accordance with component maintenance data, to maintenance organisations not holding the corresponding B/C rating and to independent certifying staff, subject to the agreement of:<br> The authority responsible for the oversight of the maintenance organisation (refer to M.1, paragraph 2 for M.A. Subpart F maintenance organisations, or to 145.1 for Part-145 maintenance organisations), or,<br> The authority of the Member State of registry in the case of maintenance performed by independent certifying staff.<br>This should only be permitted by the competent authority in the case of simple component maintenance, where the competent authority is satisfied that the certifying staff are appropriately qualified and the proper tooling and facilities are available. It is important to note that for more complex component maintenance, special qualifications may be required and it is not enough with holding a Part-66 aircraft maintenance licence.

  • (c) By derogation from paragraph (a), maintenance of an engine/Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) component in accordance with engine/APU maintenance data or, if agreed by the competent authority, in accordance with component maintenance data, may be performed by a B rated organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M) or with Annex II (Part-145) only whilst such components are fitted to the engine/APU. Nevertheless, such B rated organisation may temporarily remove this component for maintenance, in order to improve access to the component, except when such removal generates the need for additional maintenance not eligible for the provisions of this paragraph.

  • (d) By derogation from paragraph (a) and point M.A.801(b)2, maintenance of a component while installed or temporarily removed from an ELA1 aircraft not used in commercial air transport and performed in accordance with component maintenance data, may be performed by certifying staff referred to in point M.A.801(b)2, except for:<br>1. overhaul of components other than engines and propellers, and;<br>2. overhaul of engines and propellers for aircraft other than CS-VLA, CS-22 and LSA.<br>Component maintenance performed in accordance with paragraph (d) is not eligible for the issuance of an EASA Form 1 and shall be subject to the aircraft release requirements provided for in point M.A.801.

  • (e) Maintenance of components referred to in 21A.307(c) of the Annex (Part-21) to Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 shall be performed by an A-rated organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part-M) or Part-145, by certifying staff referred to in point M.A.801(b)2 or by the pilot-owner referred to in point M.A.801(b)3 while such a component is fitted to the aircraft or temporarily removed to improve access. Component maintenance performed in accordance with this paragraph is not eligible for the issuance of an EASA Form 1 and shall be subject to the aircraft release requirements provided for in point M.A.801.

M.A.503 Service life limited components

  • (a) Installed service life limited components shall not exceed the approved service life limit as specified in the approved maintenance programme and airworthiness directives, except as provided for in point M.A.504(c).

  • (b) The approved service life is expressed in calendar time, flight hours, landings or cycles, as appropriate.

  • (c) At the end the approved service life, the component must be removed from the aircraft for maintenance, or for disposal in the case of components with a certified life limit.

M.A.504 Control of unserviceable components

  • (a) A component shall be considered unserviceable in any one of the following circumstances:<br>1. expiry of the service life limit as defined in the maintenance program;<br>2. non-compliance with the applicable airworthiness directives and other continued airworthiness requirement mandated by the Agency;<br>3. absence of the necessary information to determine the airworthiness status or eligibility for installation;<br>4. evidence of defects or malfunctions;<br>5. involvement in an incident or accident likely to affect its serviceability.

  • AMC M.A.504 (a) - Control of unserviceable components<br>A component continues to be unserviceable until a decision is taken pursuant to AMC M.A.605 (c) 6

  • (b) Unserviceable components shall be identified and stored in a secure<br>location under the control of an approved maintenance organisation until a decision is made on the future status of such component. Nevertheless, for aircraft not used in commercial air transport other than large aircraft, the person or organisation that declared the component unserviceable may transfer its custody, after identifying it as unserviceable, to the aircraft owner provided that such transfer is reflected in the aircraft logbook or engine logbook or component logbook.

  • AMC M.A.504 (b) - Control of unserviceable components<br>1. M.A.801(b)(2) and M.A.801(c) certifying staff or the Section A Subpart F/Part-145 approved maintenance organisation performing maintenance should ensure proper identification of any unserviceable components.<br>2. The unserviceable status of the component should be clearly declared on a tag together with the component identification data and any information useful to define actions necessary to be taken. Such information should state, as applicable, in service times, maintenance status, preservation status, failures, defects or malfunctions reported or detected exposure to adverse environmental conditions, if the component has been involved in or affected by an accident/incident. Means should be provided to prevent unwanted separation of this tag from the component.<br>3. M.A.801(b)(2) and M.A.801(c) certifying staff performing aircraft maintenance should send, with the agreement of the aircraft owner/lessee, any unserviceable component to a maintenance organisation approved under Section A Subpart F or Part-145 for controlled storage, or transfer the custody of the component to the owner itself under the conditions specified in M.A.504(b).<br>“A secure location under the control of an approved maintenance organisation” means a secure location for which security is the responsibility of the approved maintenance organisation. This may include facilities established by the approved maintenance organisation at locations different from the main maintenance facilities. These locations should be identified in the relevant procedures of the approved maintenance organisation.

  • (c) Components which have reached their certified life limit or contain a non-repairable defect shall be classified as unsalvageable and shall not be permitted to re-enter the component supply system, unless certified life limits have been extended or a repair solution has been approved according to M.A.304.

  • AMC M.A.504 (c) - Control of unserviceable components – unsalvageable components<br>1. The following types of components should typically be classified as unsalvageable:<br>(a) components with non-repairable defects, whether visible or not to the naked eye;<br>(b) components that do not meet design specifications, and cannot be brought into conformity with such specifications;<br>(c) components subjected to unacceptable modification or rework that is irreversible;<br>(d) certified life-limited parts that have reached or exceeded their certified life limits, or have missing or incomplete records;<br>(e) components that cannot be returned to airworthy condition due to exposure to extreme forces, heat or adverse environment;<br>(f) components for which conformity with an applicable airworthiness directive cannot be accomplished;<br>(g) components for which continuing airworthiness records and/or traceability to the manufacturer can not be retrieved.<br>2. It is common practice for possessors of aircraft components to dispose of unsalvageable components by selling, discarding, or transferring such items. In some instances, these items have reappeared for sale and in the active parts inventories of the aviation community. Misrepresentation of the status of components and the practice of making such items appear serviceable has resulted in the use of unsalvageable nonconforming components. Therefore organisations disposing of unsalvageable aircraft components should consider the possibility of such components later being misrepresented and sold as serviceable components. Caution should be exercised to ensure that unsalvageable components are disposed of in a manner that does not allow them to be returned to service.

  • (d) Any person or organisation accountable under Part-M shall, in the case of a paragraph (c) unsalvageable components:<br>1. retain such component in the paragraph (b) location, or;<br>2. arrange for the component to be mutilated in a manner that ensures that it is beyond economic salvage or repair before relinquishing responsibility for such component.

  • AMC M.A.504 (d) 2 - Control of unserviceable components<br>1. Mutilation should be accomplished in such a manner that the components become permanently unusable for their original intended use. Mutilated components should not be able to be reworked or camouflaged to provide the appearance of being serviceable, such as by re-plating, shortening and re-threading long bolts, welding, straightening, machining, cleaning, polishing, or repainting.<br>2. Mutilation may be accomplished by one or a combination of the following procedures:<br>(a) grinding,<br>(b) burning,<br>(c) removal of a major lug or other integral feature,<br>(d) permanent distortion of parts,<br>(e) cutting a hole with cutting torch or saw,<br>(f) melting,<br>(g) sawing into many small pieces,<br>(h) any other method accepted by the competent authority or the Agency on a case by case basis.<br>3. The following procedures are examples of mutilation that are often less successful because they may not be consistently effective:<br>(a) stamping or vibro-etching,<br>(b) spraying with paint,<br>(c) small distortions, incisions or hammer marks,<br>(d) identification by tag or markings,<br>(e) drilling small holes,<br>(f) sawing in two pieces only.<br>4. Since manufacturers producing approved aircraft components should maintain records of serial numbers for "retired" certified life-limited or other critical components, the organisation that mutilates a component should provide the original manufacturer with the data plate and/or serial number and final disposition of the component.

  • (e) Notwithstanding paragraph (d) a person or organisation accountable under Part-M may transfer responsibility of components classified as unsalvageable to an organisation for training or research without mutilation.

  • AMC M.A.504 (e) - Control of unserviceable components<br>A maintenance organisation may choose, in agreement with the component’s owner, to release an unsalvageable component for legitimate non-flight uses, such as for training and education, research and development. In such instances, mutilation may not be appropriate. The following methods should be used to prevent the component re-entering the aviation supply system:<br>(a) permanently marking or stamping the component, as "NOT SERVICEABLE." (Ink stamping is not an acceptable method);<br>(b) removing original part number identification;<br>(c) removing data plate identification;<br>(d) maintaining a tracking or accountability system, by serial number or other individualised data, to record transferred unsalvageable aircraft component;<br>(e) including written procedures concerning disposal of such components in any agreement or contract transferring such components.<br>NOTE: Unsalvageable components should not be released to any person or organisation that is known to return unsalvageable components back into the aviation supply system, due to the potential safety threat.

SUBPART F - MAINTENANCE ORGANISATION

M.A.601 Scope

  • This Subpart establishes the requirements to be met by an organisation to qualify for the issue or continuation of an approval for the maintenance of aircraft and components not listed in point M.A.201(g).

  • AMC M.A.601 Scope<br>An approved maintenance organisation may be approved to maintain aircraft/aircraft components not type certificated by the Agency.

M.A.602 Application

  • An application for issue or change of a maintenance organisation approval shall be made on a form and in a manner established by the competent authority

  • AMC M.A.602 Application<br>An application should be made on an EASA Form 2 (Appendix IX to AMC M:A:602 and AMC M:A:702) or equivalent acceptable to the competent authority.<br>The EASA Form 2 is valid for the application for M.A. Subpart F, Part-145 and M.A. Subpart G organisations. Organisations applying for several approvals may do so by using a single EASA Form 2.

M.A.603 Extent of approval

  • (a) An organisation involved in activities subject to this Subpart shall not exercise its activities unless approved by the competent authority. Appendix V to Annex I (Part-M) provides the template certificate for this approval.

  • AMC M.A.603 (a) Extent of Approval<br>The following table identifies the ATA specification 2200 Chapter for the category C component rating. If the maintenance manual (or equivalent document) does not follow the ATA Chapters, the corresponding subjects still apply to the applicable C rating. <br>(Se AMC M.A.603 (a) )

  • (b) The maintenance organisation's manual referred to in point M.A.604 shall specify the scope of work deemed to constitute approval. Appendix IV to Annex I (Part-M) defines all classes and ratings possible under Subpart F.

  • (c) An approved maintenance organisation may fabricate, in conformity with maintenance data, a restricted range of parts for the use in the course of undergoing work within its own facilities, as identified in the maintenance organisation manual.

  • AMC M.A.603 (c) Extent of approval<br>1. The agreement by the competent authority for the fabrication of parts by the approved maintenance organisation should be formalised through the approval of a detailed procedure in the maintenance organisation manual. This AMC contains principles and conditions to be taken into account for the preparation of an acceptable procedure.<br>2. Fabrication, inspection, assembly and test should be clearly within the technical and procedural capability of the approved maintenance organisation.<br>3. The approved data necessary to fabricate the part are those approved either by the agency, the TC holder, Part-21 design organisation approval holder, or STC holder.<br>4. Items fabricated by an approved maintenance organisation may only be used by that organisation in the course of overhaul, maintenance, modifications, or repair of aircraft or components undergoing work within its own facility. The permission to fabricate does not constitute approval for manufacture, or to supply externally and the parts do not qualify for certification on EASA Form 1. This also applies to the bulk transfer or surplus inventory, in that locally fabricated parts are physically segregated and excluded from any delivery certification.<br>5. Fabrication of parts, modification kits etc for onward supply and/or sale may not be conducted under a M.A. Subpart F approval.<br>6. The data specified in paragraph 3 may include repair procedures involving the fabrication of parts. Where the data on such parts is<br>sufficient to facilitate fabrication, the parts may be fabricated by an approved maintenance organisation. Care should be taken to ensure that the data include details of part numbering, dimensions, materials, processes, and any special manufacturing techniques, special raw material specification or/and incoming inspection requirement and that the approved organisation has the necessary capability. That capability should be defined by way of maintenance organisation manual content. Where special processes or inspection procedures are defined in the approved data which are not available at the approved maintenance organisation, that organisation can not fabricate the part unless the TC/STC-holder gives an approved alternative.<br>7. Examples of fabrication under the scope of an M.A. Subpart F approval can include but are not limited to the following:<br>(a) fabrication of bushes, sleeves and shims,<br>(b) fabrication of secondary structural elements and skin panels,<br>(c) fabrication of control cables,<br>(d) fabrication of flexible and rigid pipes,<br>(e) fabrication of electrical cable looms and assemblies,<br>(f) formed or machined sheet metal panels for repairs.<br>Note: It is not acceptable to fabricate any item to pattern unless an engineering drawing of the item is produced which includes any necessary fabrication processes and which is accepted to the competent authority.<br>8. Where a TC-holder or an approved production organisation is prepared to make available complete data which is not referred to in aircraft manuals or service bulletins but provides manufacturing drawings for items specified in parts lists, the fabrication of these items is not considered to be within the scope of an M.A. Subpart F approval unless agreed otherwise by the competent authority in accordance with a procedure specified in the maintenance organisation manual.<br>9. Inspection and Identification.<br>Any locally fabricated part should be subject to an inspection stage before, separately, and preferably independently from, any inspection of its installation. The inspection should establish full compliance with the relevant manufacturing data, and the part should be unambiguously identified as fit for use by stating conformity to the approved data. Adequate records should be maintained of all such fabrication processes including heat treatment and the final inspections. All parts, excepting those with inadequate space, should carry a part number which clearly relates it to the manufacturing/inspection data. Additional to the part number the approved maintenance organisation's identity should be marked on the part for traceability purposes.

M.A.604 Maintenance organisation manual

  • AMC M.A.604 Maintenance organisation manual (Note: Appendix AMC IV)<br>1. Appendix AMC IV to this AMC provides an outline of the format of an acceptable maintenance organisation manual for a small organisation with less than 10 maintenance staff.<br>2. The maintenance organisation exposition as specified in Part-145 provides an outline of the format of an acceptable maintenance organisation manual for larger organisations with more than 10 maintenance staff, dependent upon the complexity of the organisation.

  • (a) The maintenance organisation shall provide a manual containing at least the following information:<br>1. a statement signed by the accountable manager to confirm that the organisation will continuously work in accordance with Part-M and the manual at all times, and;<br>2. the organisation's scope of work, and;<br>3. the title(s) and name(s) of person(s) referred to in M.A.606(b), and;<br>4. an organisation chart showing associated chains of responsibility between the person(s) referred to in M.A.606(b), and;<br>5. a list of certifying staff with their scope of approval, and;<br>6. a list of locations where maintenance is carried out, together with a general descriptions of the facilities;<br>7. procedures specifying how the maintenance organisation ensures compliance with this Part, and;<br>8. the maintenance organisation manual amendment procedure(s).

  • (b) The approved by the competent authority. maintenance organisation manual and its amendments shall be

  • (c) Notwithstanding paragraph (b) minor amendments to the manual may be approved through a procedure (hereinafter called indirect approval).

  • Appendix AMC IV to AMC M.A.604 Maintenance Organisation Manual<br>1. Purpose<br>The maintenance organisation manual is the reference for all the work carried out by the approved maintenance organisation. It should contain all the means established by the organisation to ensure compliance with Part-M according to the extent of approval and the privileges granted to the organisation.<br>The maintenance organisation manual should define precisely the work that the approved maintenance organisation is authorised to carry out and the subcontracted work. It should detail the resources used by the organisation, its structure and its procedures.<br>2. Content<br>A typical Maintenance Organisation Manual for a small organisation (less than 10 maintenance staff) should be designed to be used directly on a day to day basis. The working documents and lists should be directly included into the manual. It should contain the following:<br>Part A.<br>— General<br>— Table of content<br>— List of effective pages <br>— Record of amendments <br>— Amendment procedure<br> Drafting<br> Amendments requiring direct approval by the competent authority<br> Approval<br>— Distribution<br> Name or title of each person holding a copy of the manual<br>— Accountable manager statement<br> Approval of the manual<br> Statement that the maintenance organisation manual and any incorporated document identified therein reflect the organisation’s means of compliance with Part-M<br> Commitment to work according to the manual<br> Commitment to amend the manual when necessary<br>Part B<br>— Description<br>— Organisation’s scope of work<br> Description of the work carried out by the organisation (type of product, type of work) and subcontracted work<br> Identification of the level of work which can be performed at each facility.<br>— General presentation of the organisation<br> Legal name and social status<br>— Name and title of management personnel<br> Accountable manager<br> Senior managers<br> Duties and responsibilities<br>— Organisation chart <br>— Certifying staff<br> Minimum qualification and experience<br> List of authorised certifying staff, their scope of qualification and the personal authorisation reference <br>— Personnel<br> Technical personnel (number, qualifications and experience)<br> Administrative personnel (number) <br>— General description of the facility<br> Geographical location (map)<br> Plan of hangars<br> Specialised workshops<br> Office accommodation<br> Stores<br> Availability of all leased facilities. <br>— Tools, equipment and material<br> List of tools, equipment and material used (including access to tools used on occasional basis)<br> Test apparatus<br> Calibration frequencies<br>— Maintenance data<br> List of maintenance data used in accordance with M.A.402, and appropriate amendment subscription information (including<br>access to data used on occasional basis). <br>Part C<br>— General Procedures<br>— Organisational review<br> Purpose (to insure that the approved maintenance organisation continues to meet the requirements of Part-M)<br> Responsibility<br> Organisation, frequency, scope and content (including processing of authority’s findings)<br> Planning and performance of the review<br> Organisational review checklist and forms<br> Processing and correction of review findings<br> Reporting<br> Review of subcontracted work<br>— Training<br> Description of the methods used to ensure compliance with the personnel qualification and training requirements (certifying staff training, specialised training)<br> Description of the personnel records to be retained<br>— Subcontracting of specialised services<br> Selection criteria and control<br> Nature of subcontracted work<br> List of subcontractors<br> Nature of arrangements<br> Assignment of responsibilities for the certification of the work performed <br>— One time authorisations<br> Maintenance checks<br> Certifying staff <br>Part D<br>— Working Procedures<br>— Work order acceptance<br>— Preparation and issue of the work package<br> Control of the work order<br> Preparation of the planned work<br> Work package content (copy of forms, work cards, procedure for their use, distribution)<br> Responsibilities and signatures needed for the authorisation of the work<br>— Logistics<br> Persons/functions involved<br> Criteria for choosing suppliers<br> Procedures used for incoming inspection and storage of parts, tools and materials<br> Copy of forms and procedure for their use and distribution<br>— Execution<br> Persons/functions involved and respective role<br> Documentation (work package and work cards)<br> Copy of forms and procedure for their use and distribution<br> Use of work cards or manufacturer’s documentation<br> Procedures for accepting components from stores including eligibility check<br> Procedures for returning unserviceable components to stores<br>— Release to Service – Certifying staff<br> Authorised certifying staff functions and responsibilities<br>— Release to Service - Supervision<br>Detailed description of the system used to ensure that all maintenance tasks, applicable to the work requested of the approved maintenance organisation, have been completed as required.<br> Supervision content<br> Copy of forms and procedure for their use and distribution<br> Control of the work package<br>— Release to Service – Certificate of release to service<br> Procedure for signing the CRS (including preliminary actions)<br> Certificate of release to service wording and standardised form<br> Completion of the aircraft continuing airworthiness record system<br> Completion of EASA Form 1<br> Incomplete maintenance<br> Check flight authorisation<br> Copy of CRS and EASA Form 1<br>— Records<br>— Special procedures<br>Such as specialised tasks, disposal of unsalvageable components, re-certification of parts not having an EASA Form 1, etc. <br>— Occurrence reporting<br> Occurrences to be reported<br> Timeframe of reports<br> Information to be reported<br> Recipients<br>— Management of indirect approval of the manual<br> Amendments content eligible for indirect approval<br> Responsibility<br> Traceability<br> Information to the competent authority<br> Final validation<br>Part E<br>— Appendices<br>— Sample of all documents used.<br>— List of maintenance locations.<br>— List of Part 145 or M.A. Subpart F organisations. <br>— List of subcontracted specialised services<br>4. Approval<br>The competent authority should approve the manual in writing. This will normally be done by approving a list of effective pages.<br>Minor amendments, or amendments to a large capability list, can be approved indirectly, through a procedure approved by the member state.<br>5. Continuous compliance with Part-M<br>When a maintenance organisation manual no longer meets the requirements of this Part-M, whether through a change in Part-M, a change in the organisation or its activities, or through an inadequacy shown to exist by verification inspections conducted under the organisational review, or any other reason that affects the manuals conformity to requirements, the approved maintenance organisation is responsible to prepare and have approved an amendment to its manual.<br>6. Distribution<br>The manual describes how the organisation works therefore the manual or relevant parts thereof need to be distributed to all concerned staff in the organisation and contracted organisations.

M.A.605 Facilities

  • The organisation shall ensure that:<br>(a) Facilities are provided for all planned work, specialised workshops and bays are segregated as appropriate, to ensure protection from contamination and the environment.

  • AMC M.A.605 (a) Facilities<br>1. Where a hangar is not owned by the M.A. Subpart F organisation, it may be necessary to establish proof of tenancy. In addition, sufficiency of hangar space to carry out planned maintenance should be demonstrated by the preparation of a projected aircraft hangar visit plan relative to the aircraft maintenance programme. The aircraft hangar visit plan should be updated on a regular basis.<br>For balloons and airships a hangar may not be required where maintenance of the envelope and bottom end equipment can more appropriately be performed outside, providing all necessary maintenance can be accomplished in accordance with M.A.402. For complex repairs or component maintenance requiring an EASA Form 1, suitable approved workshops should be provided. The facilities and environmental conditions required for inspection and maintenance should be defined in the Maintenance Organisation Manual.<br>2. Protection from the weather elements relates to the normal prevailing local weather elements that are expected throughout any twelve- month period. Aircraft hangar and aircraft component workshop structures should be to a standard that prevents the ingress of rain, hail, ice, snow, wind and dust etc. Aircraft hangar and aircraft component workshop floors should be sealed to minimise dust generation.<br>3. Aircraft maintenance staff should be provided with an area where they may study maintenance instructions and complete continuing airworthiness records in a proper manner.

  • (b) Office accommodation is provided for the management of all planned work including in particular, the completion of maintenance records.

  • AMC M.A.605 (b) Facilities<br>It is acceptable to combine any or all of the office accommodation requirements into one office subject to the staff having sufficient room to carry out assigned tasks.

  • (c) Secure storage facilities are provided for components, equipment, tools and material. Storage conditions shall ensure segregation of unserviceable components and material from all other components, material, equipment and tools. Storage conditions shall be in accordance with the manufacturers' instructions and access shall be restricted to authorised personnel.

  • AMC M.A.605 (c) Facilities<br>1. Storage facilities for serviceable aircraft components should be clean, wellventilated and maintained at an even dry temperature to minimise the effects of condensation. Manufacturer’s storage recommendations should be followed for those aircraft components identified in such published recommendations.<br>2. Adequate storage racks should be provided and strong enough to hold aircraft components and provide sufficient support for large aircraft components such that the component is not damaged during storage.<br>3. All aircraft components, wherever practicable, should remain packaged in their protective material to minimise damage and corrosion during storage. A shelf life control system should be utilised and identity tags used to identify components.<br>4. Segregation means storing unserviceable components in a separate secured location from serviceable components.<br>5. Segregation and management of any unserviceable component should be ensured according to the pertinent procedure approved to that<br>organisation.<br>6 Procedures should be defined by the organisation describing the decision process for the status of unserviceable components. This procedure should identify at least the following:<br>- role and responsibilities of the persons managing the decision process;<br>- description of the decision process to chose between maintaining, storing or mutilating a component;<br>- traceability of decision<br>7. Once unserviceable components or materials have been identified as unsalvageable in accordance with M.A.504 (c), the organisation should establish secure areas in which to segregate such items and to prevent unauthorised access. Unsalvageable components should be managed through a procedure to ensure that these components receive the appropriate final disposal according to M.A.504 (d) or (e). The person responsible for the implementation of this procedure should be identified.

M.A.606 Personnel requirements

  • (a) The organisation shall appoint an accountable manager, who has corporate authority for ensuring that all maintenance required by the customer can be financed and carried out to the standard required by this Part.

  • AMC M.A.606 (a) Personnel requirements<br>With regard to the accountable manager, it is normally intended to mean the chief executive officer of the maintenance organisation approved under M.A. Subpart F, who by virtue of position has overall (including in particular financial) responsibility for running the organisation. The accountable manager may be the accountable manager for more than one organisation and is not required to be necessarily knowledgeable on technical matters. When the accountable manager is not the chief executive officer, the competent authority will need to be assured that such an accountable manager has direct access to chief executive officer and has a sufficiency of maintenance funding allocation.

  • (b) A person or group of persons shall be nominated with the responsibility of ensuring that the organisation is always in compliance with this Subpart. Such person(s) shall be ultimately responsible to the accountable manager.

  • AMC M.A.606 (b) Personnel requirements<br>1. Dependent upon the size of the organisation, the functions may be subdivided under individual managers or combined in any number of ways.<br>2. The maintenance organisation should have, dependent upon the extent of approval, an aircraft maintenance manager, a workshop manager all of whom should report to the accountable manager. In small maintenance organisations any manager may also be the accountable manager, and may also be the aircraft maintenance manager or the workshop manager.<br>3. The aircraft maintenance manager is responsible for ensuring that all maintenance required to be carried out, plus any defect rectification carried out during aircraft maintenance, is carried out to the design and quality standards specified in this Part. The aircraft maintenance manager is also responsible for any corrective action resulting from the M.A.616 organisational review.<br>4. The workshop manager is responsible for ensuring that all work on aircraft components is carried out to the standards specified in this Part and also responsible for any corrective action resulting from the M.A.616 organisational review.<br>5. Notwithstanding the example sub-paragraphs 2 - 4 titles, the organisation may adopt any title for the foregoing managerial positions but should identify to the competent authority the titles and persons chosen to carry out these functions.

  • (c) All paragraph (b) persons shall be able to show relevant knowledge, background and appropriate experience related to aircraft and/or component maintenance.

  • AMC M.A.606(c) Personnel requirements<br>1. All nominated persons should, in the normal way, be expected to satisfy the competent authority that they possess the appropriate experience and qualifications which are listed in paragraphs 2.1 to 2.5 below.<br>

  • (d) The organisation shall have appropriate staff for the normal expected contracted work. The use of temporarily subcontracted staff is permitted in the case of higher than normally expected contracted work and only for personnel not issuing a certificate of release to service.

  • AMC M.A.606 (d) Personnel requirements<br>1. All staff are subjected to compliance with the organisation’s procedures specified in the maintenance organisation manual relevant to their duties.<br>2. To have sufficient staff means that the approved maintenance organisation employs or contracts staff directly, even on a volunteer basis, for the anticipated maintenance workload.<br>3. Temporarily sub-contracted means the person is employed by another organisation and contracted by that organisation to the approved maintenance organisation.

  • (e) The qualification of all personnel involved in maintenance shall be demonstrated and recorded.

  • AMC M.A.606(e) Personnel requirements<br>1. Personnel involved in maintenance should be assessed for competence by 'on the job' evaluation and/or by examination relevant to their particular job role within the organisation before unsupervised work is permitted.<br>2. Adequate initial and recurrent training should be provided and recorded to ensure continued competence.

  • (f) Personnel who carry out specialised tasks such as welding, non- destructive testing/inspection other than colour contrast shall be qualified in accordance with an officially recognised standard.

  • AMC M.A.606 (f) Personnel requirements<br>1. Continued airworthiness non-destructive testing means such testing specified by the type certificate holder of the aircraft, engine or propeller in the M.A.304 (b) maintenance data for in service aircraft/aircraft components for the purpose of determining the continued fitness of the product to operate safely.<br>2. Appropriately qualified means to level 1, 2 or 3 as defined by European Standard EN 4179 dependant upon the non-destructive testing function to be carried out.<br>3. Notwithstanding the fact that level 3 personnel may be qualified via EN 4179 to establish and authorise methods, techniques, etc., this does not permit such personnel to deviate from methods and techniques published by the type certificate holder/manufacturer in the form of continued airworthiness data, such as in non-destructive test manuals or service bulletins, unless the manual or service bulletin expressly permits such deviation.<br>4. Notwithstanding the general references in EN 4179 to a national aerospace NDI board, all examinations should be conducted by personnel or organisations under the general control of such a board. In the absence of a national aerospace NDI board, examinations should be conducted by personnel or organisations under the general control of the NDI board of a Member State designated by the competent authority.<br>5. Particular non-destructive test means any one or more of the following: dye penetrant, magnetic particle, eddy current, ultrasonic and radiographic methods including X ray and gamma ray.<br>6. In addition it should be noted that new methods are and will be developed, such as, but not limited to thermography and shearography, which are not specifically addressed by EN 4179. Until such time as an agreed standard is established such methods should be carried out in accordance with the particular equipment manufacturers’ recommendations including any training and examination process to ensure competence of the personnel with the process.<br>7. Any approved maintenance organisation that carries out continued airworthiness non-destructive testing should establish qualification procedures for non-destructive testing.<br>8. Boroscoping and other techniques such as delamination coin tapping are nondestructive inspections rather than non-destructive testing. Notwithstanding such differentiation, approved maintenance organisation should establish a procedure to ensure that personnel who carry out and interpret such inspections are properly trained and assessed for their competence with the process. Non-destructive inspections, not being considered as non-destructive testing by M.A. Subpart F are not listed in Appendix IV to Part-M under class rating D1.<br>9. The referenced standards, methods, training and procedures should be specified in the maintenance organisation manual.<br>10. Any such personnel who intend to carry out and/or control a non-destructive test for which they were not qualified prior to the effective date<br>of Part-M should qualify for such non-destructive test in accordance with EN 4179.<br>11. In this context officially recognised standard means those standards established or published by an official body whether having legal personality or not, which are widely recognised by the air transport sector as constituting good practice

  • (g) The maintenance organisation shall have sufficient certifying staff to issue M.A.612 and M.A.613 certificates of release to service for aircraft and components. They shall comply with the requirements of Part-66.

  • (h) By derogation from paragraph (g), the organisation may use certifying staff qualified in accordance with the following provisions when providing maintenance support to operators involved in commercial operations, subject to appropriate procedures to be approved as part of the organisation’s manual:<br>1. For a repetitive pre-flight airworthiness directive which specifically states that the flight crew may carry out such airworthiness directive, the organisation may issue a limited certifying staff authorisation to the aircraft commander on the basis of the flight crew licence held, provided that the organisation ensures that sufficient practical training has been carried out to ensure that such person can accomplish the airworthiness directive to the required standard;<br>2. In the case of aircraft operating away from a supported location the organisation may issue a limited certifying staff authorisation to the aircraft commander on the basis of the flight crew licence, provided that the organisation ensures that sufficient practical training has been carried out to ensure that such person can accomplish the task to the required standard.

  • AMC M.A.606(h)2 Personnel requirements<br>1. For the issue of a limited certification authorisation the commander should hold either a valid air transport pilot license (ATPL), or commercial pilots license (CPL), or a national equivalent acceptable to the competent authority on the aircraft type. In addition, the limited certification authorisation is subject to the maintenance organisation manual containing procedures to address the following:<br>a. Completion of adequate maintenance airworthiness regulation training.<br>b. Completion of adequate task training for the specific task on the aircraft. The task training should be of sufficient duration to ensure that the individual has a thorough understanding of the task to be completed and should involve training in the use of associated maintenance data.<br>c. Completion of the procedural training.<br>The above procedures should be specified in the maintenance organisation manual and be accepted by the competent authority.<br>2. Typical tasks that may be certified and/or carried out by the commander holding an ATPL or CPL are minor maintenance or simple checks included in the following list:<br>a. Replacement of internal lights, filaments and flash tubes.<br>b. Closing of cowlings and refitment of quick access inspection panels.<br>c. Role changes, e.g., stretcher fit, dual controls, FLIR, doors, photographic equipment etc.<br>d. Inspection for and removal of de-icing/anti-icing fluid residues, including removal/closure of panels, cowls or covers that are easily accessible but not requiring the use of special tools.<br>e. Any check/replacement involving simple techniques consistent with this AMC and as agreed by the competent authority.<br>3. The authorisation should have a finite life of twelve months subject to satisfactory recurrent training on the applicable aircraft type.

M.A.607 Certifying staff

  • AMC M.A.607 Certifying staff<br>1. Adequate understanding of the relevant aircraft and/or aircraft component(s) to be maintained together with the associated organisation procedures means that the person has received training and has relevant maintenance experience on the product type and associated organisation procedures such that the person understands how the product functions, what are the more common defects with associated consequences.<br>2. All prospective certifying staff are required to be assessed for competence, qualification and capability related to intended certifying duties. Competence and capability can be assessed by having the person work under the supervision of another certifying person for sufficient time to arrive at a conclusion. Sufficient time could be as little as a few weeks if the person is fully exposed to relevant work. The person need not be assessed against the complete spectrum of intended duties. When the person has been recruited from another approved maintenance organisation and was a certifying person in that organisation then it is reasonable to accept a written confirmation from the previous organisation.<br>3. The organisation should hold copies of all documents that attest to qualification, and to recent experience.

  • (a) In addition to M.A.606(g), certifying staff can only exercise their privileges, if the organisation has ensured:<br>1. that certifying staff can demonstrate that they meet the<br>requirements of point 66.A.20(b) of Annex III (Part 66), except when Annex III (Part 66) refers to Member State regulation, in which case they shall meet the requirement of such regulation, and;<br>2. that certifying staff have an adequate understanding of the relevant aircraft and/or aircraft component(s) to be maintained together with the associated organisation procedures.

  • (b) In the following unforeseen cases, where an aircraft is grounded at a location other than the main base where no appropriate certifying staff is available, the maintenance organisation contracted to provide maintenance support may issue a one-off certification authorisation:<br>1. to one of its employees holding type qualifications on aircraft of similar technology, construction and systems; or<br>2. to any person with not less than three years maintenance experience and holding a valid ICAO aircraft maintenance licence rated for the aircraft type requiring certification provided there is no organisation appropriately approved under this Part at that location and the contracted organisation obtains and holds on file evidence of the experience and the licence of that person.<br>All such cases must be reported to the competent authority within seven days of the issuance of such certification authorisation. The approved maintenance organisation issuing the one-off certification authorization shall ensure that any such maintenance that could affect flight safety is re-checked.

  • AMC M.A.607 (b) Certifying staff<br>1. The following minimum information as applicable should be kept on record in respect of each certifying person:<br>(a) name;<br>(b) date of birth;<br>(c) basic training;<br>(d) type training;<br>(e) recurrent training;<br>(f) specialised training;<br>(g) experience;<br>(h) qualifications relevant to the approval;<br>(i) scope of the authorisation and personal authorisation reference.<br>(j) date of first issue of the authorisation;<br>(k) if appropriate - expiry date of the authorisation.<br>2. Persons authorised to access the system should be maintained at a minimum to ensure that records cannot be altered in an unauthorised manner or that such confidential records become accessible to unauthorised persons.<br>3. The competent authority should be granted access to the records upon request.

  • (c) The approved maintenance organisation shall record all details concerning certifying staff and maintain a current list of all certifying staff together with their scope of approval as part of the organisation’s manual pursuant to point M.A.604(a)5.

M.A.608 Components, equipment and tools

  • (a) The organisation shall:<br>1. hold the equipment and tools specified in the maintenance data<br>described in point M.A.609 or verified equivalents as listed in the maintenance organisation manual as necessary for day-to-day maintenance within the scope of the approval; and,<br>2. demonstrate that it has access to all other equipment and tools used only on an occasional basis.

  • AMC M.A.608 (a) Components, equipment and tools<br>1. Once the applicant for M.A. Subpart F approval has determined the intended scope of approval for consideration by the competent authority, it will be necessary to show that all tools and equipment as specified in the maintenance data can be made available when needed.<br>2. All such tools should be clearly identified and listed in a control register including any personal tools and equipment that the organisation agrees can be used.<br>3. For tools required on an occasional basis, the organisation should ensure that they are controlled in terms of servicing or calibration as required.

  • (b) Tools and equipment shall be controlled and calibrated to an officially recognised standard. Records of such calibrations and the standard used shall be kept by the organisation.

  • AMC M.A.608 (b) Components, equipment and tools<br>1. The control of these tools and equipment requires that the organisation has a procedure to inspect/service and, where appropriate, calibrate such items on a regular basis and indicate to users that the item is within any inspection or service or calibration timelimit. A clear system of labelling all tooling, equipment and test equipment is therefore necessary giving information on when the next inspection or service or calibration is due and if the item is unserviceable for any other reason where it may not be obvious. A register should be maintained for all the organisation’s precision tooling and equipment together with a record of calibrations and standards used.<br>2. Inspection, service or calibration on a regular basis should be in accordance with the equipment manufacturers' instructions except where the M.A. Subpart F organisation can show by results that a different time period is appropriate in a particular case.<br>3. In this context officially recognised standard means those standards established or published by an official body whether having legal personality or not, which are widely recognised by the air transport sector as constituting good practice

  • (c) The organisation shall inspect, classify and appropriately segregate all incoming components.

M.A.609 Maintenance data

  • The approved maintenance organisation shall hold and use applicable current maintenance data specified in M.A.401 in the performance of maintenance including modifications and repairs. In the case of customer provided maintenance data, it is only necessary to have such data when the work is in progress.

  • AMC M.A.609 Maintenance Data<br>When an organisation uses customer provided maintenance data, the scope of approval indicated in the maintenance organisation manual should be limited to the individual aircraft covered by the contracts signed with those customers unless the organisation also holds its own complete set of maintenance data for that type of aircraft.

M.A.610 Maintenance work orders

  • Before the commencement of maintenance a written work order shall be agreed between the organisation and the organisation requesting maintenance to clearly establish the maintenance to be carried out.

  • AMC M.A.610 Maintenance work orders<br>“A written work order” may take the form of, but not limited to, the following:<br> A formal document or form specifying the work to be carried out. This form may be provided by the continuing airworthiness<br>management organisation managing the aircraft, or by the maintenance organisation undertaking the work, or by the owner/operator<br>himself.<br> An entry in the aircraft log book specifying the defect that needs to be corrected.

M.A.611 Maintenance standards

  • All maintenance shall be carried out in accordance with the requirements of M.A. Subpart D.

M.A.612 Aircraft certificate of release to service

  • At the completion of all required aircraft maintenance in accordance with this Subpart an aircraft certificate of release to service shall be issued according to M.A.801.

M.A.613 Component certificate of release to service

  • (a) At the completion of all required component maintenance in accor-dance with this Subpart a component certificate of release to service shall be issued in accordance with point M.A.802. EASA Form 1 shall be issued except for those components maintained in accordance with points M.A.502(b), M.A.502(d) or M.A.502(e) and components fabricated in accordance with point M.A.603(c).

  • <br>AMC M.A.613 (a) Component certificate of release to service<br>1. An aircraft component which has been maintained off the aircraft requires the issuance of a certificate of release to service for such maintenance and another CRS to service in regard to being installed properly on the aircraft when such action occurs.<br>When an organisation maintains a component for use by the same organisation, an EASA Form 1 may not be necessary depending upon the organisation’s internal release procedures defined in the maintenance organisation exposition.<br>2. In the case of components in storage prior to Part-145, Part-M and Part-21 and not released on an EASA Form 1 or equivalent in accordance with M.A.501(a) or removed serviceable from active aircraft which have been withdrawn from service, this paragraph provides additional guidance regarding the conditions under which an EASA Form 1 may be issued .<br>2.1 An EASA Form 1 may be issued for an aircraft component which has been:<br>- Maintained before Part-145, or Part-M became effective or manufactured before Part-21 became effective.<br>- Used on an aircraft and removed in a serviceable condition. Examples include leased and loaned aircraft components.<br>- Removed from aircraft which have been withdrawn from service, or from aircraft which have been involved in abnormal occurrences such as accidents, incidents, heavy landings or lightning strikes.<br>- Components maintained by an unapproved organisation.<br>2.2. An appropriately rated M.A. Subpart F maintenance organisation may issue an EASA Form 1 as detailed in this AMC sub-paragraph 2.5 to<br>2.9, as appropriate, in accordance with the procedures detailed in the manual as approved by the competent authority. The appropriately rated M.A. Subpart F maintenance organisation is responsible for ensuring that all reasonable measures have been taken to ensure that only approved and serviceable aircraft components are issued an EASA Form 1 under this paragraph.<br>2.3. For the purposes of this paragraph 2 only, appropriately rated means an organisation with an approval class rating for the type of component or for the product in which it may be installed.<br>2.4. An EASA Form 1 issued in accordance with this paragraph 2 should be issued by signing in block 14b and stating "Inspected" in block 11. In addition, block 12 should specify:<br>2.4.1. when the last maintenance was carried out and by whom;<br>2.4.2. if the component is unused, when the component was manufactured and by whom with a cross reference to any original documentation<br>which should be included with the Form;<br>2.4.3. a list of all airworthiness directives, repairs and modifications known to have been incorporated. If no airworthiness directives or repairs or modifications are known to be incorporated then this should be stated<br>2.4.4. detail of life used for service life limited parts being any combination of fatigue, overhaul or storage life;<br>2.4.5. for any aircraft component having its own maintenance history record, reference to the particular maintenance history record as long as the record contains the details that would otherwise be required in block 12. The maintenance history record and acceptance test report or statement, if applicable, should be attached to the EASA Form 1.<br>2.5. New / unused aircraft components<br>2.5.1 Any unused aircraft component in storage without an EASA Form 1 up to the effective date(s) for Part-21 that was manufactured by an organisation acceptable to the competent authority at the time may be issued an EASA Form 1 by an appropriately rated maintenance organisation approved under M.A. Subpart F. The EASA Form 1 should be issued in accordance with the following subparagraphs which should be included in a procedure within the maintenance organisation manual.<br>Note 1: It should be understood that the release of a stored but unused aircraft component in accordance with this paragraph represents a maintenance release under M.A. Subpart F and not a production release under Part-21. It is not intended to bypass the production release procedure agreed by the Member State for parts and subassemblies intended for fitment on the manufacturers own production line.<br>(a) An acceptance test report or statement should be available for all used and unused aircraft components that are subject to acceptance testing after manufacturing or maintenance as appropriate.<br>(b) The aircraft component should be inspected for compliance with the manufacturer’s instructions and limitations for storage and condition including any requirement for limited storage life, inhibitors, controlled climate and special storage containers. In addition or in the absence of specific storage instructions the aircraft component should be inspected for damage, corrosion and leakage to ensure good condition.<br>(c) The storage life used of any storage life limited parts should be established.<br>2.5.2. If it is not possible to establish satisfactory compliance with all applicable conditions specified in subparagraph 2.5.1 (a) to (c) inclusive the aircraft component should be disassembled by an appropriately rated organisation and subjected to a check for incorporated airworthiness directives, repairs and modifications and inspected/tested in accordance with the maintenance data to establish satisfactory condition and, if relevant, all seals, lubricants and life limited parts replaced. Upon satisfactory completion after reassembly an EASA Form 1 may be issued stating what was carried out and the reference to the maintenance data included.<br>2.6. Used aircraft components removed from a serviceable aircraft.<br>2.6.1. Serviceable aircraft components removed from a Member State registered aircraft may be issued an EASA Form 1 by an appropriately rated organisation subject to compliance with this subparagraph.<br>(a). The organisation should ensure that the component was removed from the aircraft by an appropriately qualified person.<br>(b). The aircraft component may only be deemed serviceable if the last flight operation with the component fitted revealed no faults on that<br>component/related system.<br>(c). The aircraft component should be inspected for satisfactory condition including in particular damage, corrosion or leakage and compliance with any additional maintenance data.<br>(d). The aircraft record should be researched for any unusual events that could affect the serviceability of the aircraft component such as involvement in accidents, incidents, heavy landings or lightning strikes. Under no circumstances may an EASA Form 1 be issued in accordance with this paragraph 2.6 if it is suspected that the aircraft component has been subjected to extremes of stress, temperatures or immersion which could effect its operation.<br>(e). A maintenance history record should be available for all used serialised aircraft components.<br>(f). Compliance with known modifications and repairs should be established.<br>(g). The flight hours/cycles/landings as applicable of any service life limited parts including time since overhaul should be established.<br>(h). Compliance with known applicable airworthiness directives should be established.<br>(i). Subject to satisfactory compliance with this subparagraph 2.6.1 an EASA Form 1 may be issued and should contain the information as<br>specified in paragraph 2.4 including the aircraft from which the aircraft component was removed.<br>2.6.2. Serviceable aircraft components removed from a non Member State registered aircraft may only be issued an EASA Form 1 if the components are leased or loaned from the maintenance organisation approved under M.A. Subpart F who retains control of the airworthiness status of the components. An EASA Form 1 may be issued and should contain the information as specified in paragraph 2.4 including the aircraft from which the aircraft component was removed.<br>2.7. Used aircraft components removed from an aircraft withdrawn from service. Serviceable aircraft components removed from a Member State registered aircraft withdrawn from service may be issued an EASA Form 1 by a maintenance organisation approved under M.A. Subpart F subject to compliance with this sub paragraph.<br>(a). Aircraft withdrawn from service are sometimes dismantled for spares. This is considered to be a maintenance activity and should be accomplished under the control of an organisation approved under M.A. Subpart F, employing procedures approved by the competent authority.<br>(b). To be eligible for installation components removed from such aircraft may be issued with an EASA Form 1 by an appropriately rated organisation following a satisfactory assessment.<br>(c). As a minimum the assessment will need to satisfy the standards set out in paragraphs 2.5 and 2.6 as appropriate. This should where known, include the possible need for the alignment of scheduled maintenance that may be necessary to comply with the maintenance programme applicable to the aircraft on which the component is to be installed.<br>(d). Irrespective of whether the aircraft holds a certificate of airworthiness or not, the organisation responsible for certifying any removed component should satisfy itself that the manner in which the components were removed and stored are compatible with the standards required by M.A. Subpart F.<br>(e). A structured plan should be formulated to control the aircraft disassembly process. The disassembly is to be carried out by an appropriately rated organisation under the supervision of certifying staff, who will ensure that the aircraft components are removed and documented in a structured manner in accordance with the appropriate maintenance data and disassembly plan.<br>(f). All recorded aircraft defects should be reviewed and the possible effects these may have on both normal and standby functions of removed components are to be considered.<br>(g). Dedicated control documentation is to be used as detailed by the disassembly plan, to facilitate the recording of all maintenance actions and component removals performed during the disassembly process. Components found to be unserviceable are to be identified as such and quarantined pending a decision on the actions to be taken. Records of the maintenance accomplished to establish serviceability are to form part of the component maintenance history.<br>(h). Suitable M.A. Subpart F facilities for the removal and storage of removed components are to be used which include suitable environmental conditions, lighting, access equipment, aircraft tooling and storage facilities for the work to be undertaken. While it may be acceptable for components to be removed, given local environmental conditions, without the benefit of an enclosed facility subsequent disassembly (if required) and storage of the components should be in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.<br>2.8. Used aircraft components maintained by organisations not approved in accordance with M.A. Subpart F or Part-145.<br>For used components maintained by a maintenance organisation not approved under M.A.Subpart F or Part-145, due care should be taken before acceptance of such components. In such cases an appropriately rated maintenance organisation approved under M.A. Subpart F should establish satisfactory conditions by:<br>(a) dismantling the component for sufficient inspection in accordance with the appropriate maintenance data,<br>(b) replacing of all service life limit components when no satisfactory evidence of life used is available and/or the components are in an<br>unsatisfactory condition,<br>(c) reassembling and testing as necessary the component,<br>(d) completing all certification requirements as specified in M.A.613<br>In the case of used components maintained by an FAA Part-145 repair station (USA) or by TCCA CAR573 approved maintenance organisations (Canada) that does not hold an EASA Part-145 or M.A. Subpart F approval, the conditions (a) through (d) described above may be replaced by the following conditions:<br>(a) availability of an 8130-3 (FAA) or TCCA 24-0078 (TCCA) or an Authorized Release Certificate Form One (TCCA).<br>(b) verification of compliance with all applicable airworthiness directives, and<br>(c) verification that the component does not contain repairs or modifications that have not been approved in accordance with Part-21.<br>(d) inspection for satisfactory condition including in particular damage, corrosion or leakage.<br>(e) issuance of a Form 1 in compliance with paragraphs 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4.<br>These alleviated requirements are based on the fact that credit can be taken for their technical capabilities and their competent authority oversight, as attested by the following documents:<br> BASA/MIP-G Maintenance Implementation Procedures Guidance (USA)<br> AAM-G Administrative Arrangement on Maintenance Guidance (Canada)<br>2.9. Used aircraft components removed from an aircraft involved in an accident or incident.<br>Such components should only be issued with an EASA Form 1 when processed in accordance with paragraph 2.7 and a specific work order including all additional necessary tests and inspections made necessary by the accident or incident. Such a work order may require input from the TC holder or original manufacturer as appropriate. This work order should be referenced in block 12.<br>3. A certificate should not be issued for any component when it is known that the component is unserviceable except in the case of a component undergoing a series of maintenance processes at several approved maintenance organisations and the component needs a certificate for the previous maintenance process carried out for the next approved maintenance organisation to accept the component for subsequent maintenance processes. In such a case, a clear statement of limitation should be endorsed in block 12.<br>4. The certificate is to be used for export/import purposes, as well as for domestic purposes, and serves as an official certificate for components from the manufacturer/maintenance organisation to users. It should only be issued by organisations approved by a competent authority or the Agency as applicable within the scope of the approval.<br>

  • (b) The component certificate release to service document, EASA Form 1 may be generated from a computer database.

M.A.614 Maintenance records

  • (a) The approved maintenance organisation shall record all details of work carried out. Records necessary to prove all requirements have been met for issuance of the certificate of release to service including the sub-contractor's release documents shall be retained.

  • AMC M.A.614 (a) Maintenance records<br>1. Properly executed and retained records provide owners, operators and maintenance personnel with information essential in controlling unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, and trouble shooting to eliminate the need for re-inspection and rework to establish airworthiness.<br>The prime objective is to have secure and easily retrievable records with comprehensive and legible contents. The aircraft record should contain basic details of all serialised aircraft components and all other significant aircraft components installed, to ensure traceability to such installed aircraft component documentation and associated M.A.304 maintenance data.<br>2. The maintenance record can be either a paper or computer system or any combination of both. The records should remain legible throughout the required retention period.<br>3. Paper systems should use robust material which can withstand normal handling and filing.<br>4. Computer systems may be used to control maintenance and/or record details of maintenance work carried out. Computer systems used for<br>maintenance should have at least one backup system which should be updated at least within 24 hours of any maintenance. Each terminal is required to contain programme safeguards against the ability of unauthorised personnel to alter the database.

  • (b) The approved maintenance organisation shall provide a copy of each certificate of release to service to the aircraft owner, together with a copy of any specific repair/modification data used for repairs/modi-fications carried out.

  • (c) The approved maintenance organisation shall retain a copy of all maintenance records and any associated maintenance data for three years from the date the aircraft or aircraft component to which the work relates was released from the approved maintenance organisation.<br>1. The records under this paragraph shall be stored in a manner that ensures protection from damage, alteration and theft.<br>2. All computer hardware used to ensure backup shall be stored in a different location from that containing the working data in an environment that ensures they remain in good condition.<br>3. Where an approved maintenance organisation terminates its operation, all retained maintenance records covering the last three years shall be distributed to the last owner or customer of the respective aircraft or component or shall be stored as specified by the competent authority.

  • AMC M.A.614 (c) Maintenance records<br>Associated maintenance data is specific information such as repair and modification data.<br>This does not necessarily require the retention of all aircraft maintenance manual, component maintenance manual, parts catalogues etc issued by the TC holder or STC holder. Maintenance records should refer to the revision status of the data used.

M.A.615 Privileges of the organisation

  • The maintenance organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M), may:

  • (a) maintain any aircraft and/or component for which it is approved at the locations specified in the approval certificate and the maintenance organisation manual;

  • (b) arrange for the performance of specialized services under the control of the maintenance organisation at another organisation appropriately qualified, subject to appropriate procedures being established as part of the Maintenance Organisation Manual approved by the competent authority directly;

  • (c) maintain any aircraft and/or component for which it is approved at any location subject to the need of such maintenance arising either from the unserviceability of the aircraft or from the necessity of supporting occasional maintenance, subject to the conditions specified in the Maintenance Organisation Manual;

  • (d) issue certificates of release to service on completion of maintenance, in accordance with point M.A.612 or point M.A.613.’

  • AMC M.A.615 Privileges of the organisation<br>M.A.615(b) refers to work carried out by another organisation which is not appropriately approved under M.A. Subpart F or Part-145 to carry out such tasks.<br>The intent is to permit the acceptance of specialised maintenance services, such as, but not limited to, non-destructive testing, surface treatment, heat-treatment, welding, fabrication of specified parts for minor repairs and modifications, etc., without the need of Subpart F approval for those tasks. The requirement that the organisation performing the specialised services must be “appropriately qualified” means that it should meet an officially recognised standard or, otherwise, it should be acceptable to the competent authority (through the approval of the Maintenance Organisation Manual).<br>“Under the control of the Subpart F organisation” means that the Subpart F organisation should investigate the capability of the subcontracted organisation (including qualifications, facilities, equipment and materials) and ensure that such organisation:<br> Receives appropriate maintenance instructions and maintenance data for the task to be performed.<br> Properly records the maintenance performed in the Subpart F airworthiness records.<br> Notifies the Subpart F organisation for any deviation or non-conformity, which has arisen during such maintenance.<br>The certificate of release to service may be issued either at the subcontractors or at the organisation facility by authorised certifying staff, and always under the M.A. Subpart F organisation reference. Such staff would normally come from the M.A. Subpart F organisation but may otherwise be a person from the subcontractor who meets the M.A. Subpart F organisation certifying staff standard which itself is approved by the competent authority via the Maintenance Organisation Manual.<br>Subcontracted specialised services organisations should be listed in the Maintenance Organisation Manual of the Subpart F organisation together with their qualifications, and the associated control procedures.

M.A.616 Organisational review

  • To ensure that the approved maintenance organisation continues to meet the requirements of this Subpart, it shall organise, on a regular basis, organisational reviews.

  • AMC M.A.616 Organisational review (Note: Appendix AMC VIII)<br>1. The primary objectives of the organisational review are to enable the approved maintenance organisation to ensure that it can deliver a safe product and that approved maintenance organisation remains in compliance with the requirements.<br>2. The approved maintenance organisation should identify:<br>2.1. The person responsible for the organisational review, and;<br>2.2. The frequency of the reviews, and;<br>2.3. The scope and content of the reviews, and;<br>2.4. The persons accomplishing the reviews, and;<br>2.5. The procedure for planning, performing and processing review findings.<br>2.6. The procedure for ensuring corrective actions are carried out in the appropriate time frame.<br>3. The organisation quality system as specified in Part-145 provides an acceptable basic structure for the organisational review system for organisations with more than 10 maintenance staff, dependent upon the complexity of the organisation.<br>4. Appendix AMC VIII should be used to manage the organisational reviews.

  • Appendix AMC VIII to AMC M.A.616<br>This is only applicable to organisations with less than 10 maintenance staff members. For larger organisations, the principles and practices of an independent quality system should be used.<br>Depending on the complexity of the small organisation (number and type of aircraft, number of different fleets, subcontracting of specialised services, etc.), the organisational review system may vary from a system using the principles and practices of a quality system (except for the requirement of independence) to a simplified system adapted to the low complexity of the organisation and the aircraft managed.<br>As a core minimum, the organisational review system should have the following features, which should be described in the Maintenance Organisation Manual (MOM):<br>a. Identification of the person responsible for the organisational review programme.<br>By default, this person should be the accountable manager, unless he delegates this responsibility to (one of) the M.A.606(b) person(s).<br>b. Identification and qualification criteria for the person(s) responsible for performing the organisational reviews.<br>These persons should have a thorough knowledge of the regulations and of the maintenance organisation procedures. They should also have knowledge of audits, acquired through training or through experience (preferably as an auditor, but also possibly because they actively participated in several audits conducted by the competent authority).<br>c. Elaboration of the organisational review programme:<br> Checklist(s) covering all items necessary to be satisfied that the organisation delivers a safe product and complies with the regulation. All<br>procedures described in the MOM should be addressed.<br> A schedule for the accomplishment of the checklist items. Each item should be checked at least every 12 months. The organisation may<br>choose to conduct one full review annually or to conduct several partial reviews.<br>d. Performance of organisational reviews<br>Each checklist item should be answered using an appropriate combination of:<br> review of records, documentation, etc.<br> sample check of aircraft under contract or being maintained under a work order.<br> interview of personnel involved.<br> review of discrepancies and difficulty internal reports (e.g. notified difficulties in using current procedures and tools, systematic deviations<br>from procedures, etc.).<br>e. review of complaints filed by customers after delivery. Management of findings and occurrence reports.<br> All findings should be recorded and notified to the affected persons.<br> All level 1 findings, in the sense of M.A.619(a), should be immediately notified to the competent authority and all necessary actions on<br>aircraft in service should be immediately taken.<br> All occurrence reports should be reviewed with the aim for continuous improvement of the system by identifying possible corrective and<br>preventive actions. This should be done in order to find prior indicators (e.g., notified difficulties in using current procedures and tools, systematic deviations from procedures, unsafe behaviours, etc.), and dismissed alerts that, had they been recognised and appropriately managed before the event, could have resulted in the undesired event being prevented.<br> Corrective and preventive actions should be approved by the person responsible for the organisational review programme and implemented within a specified time frame.<br> Once the person responsible for the organisational review programme is satisfied that the corrective action is effective, closure of the finding should be recorded along with a summary of the corrective action.<br> The accountable manager should be notified of all significant findings and, on a regular basis, of the global results of the organisational review programme.<br><br>Following is a typical example of a simplified organisational review checklist, to be adapted as necessary to cover the MOM procedures: <br>1 – Scope of work<br>Check that:<br>• All aircraft and components under maintenance or under contract are covered in the Form 3. <br>• The scope of work in the MOM does not disagree with the Form 3.<br>• No work has been performed outside the scope of the Form 3 and the MOM.<br>2 - Maintenance data<br>• Check that maintenance data to cover the aircraft in the scope of work of the MOM are present and up-to-date. <br>• Check that no change has been made to the maintenance data from the TC holder without being notified.<br>3 – Equipment and Tools<br>• Check the equipment and tools against the lists in the MOM and check if still appropriate to the TC holder’s instructions. <br>• Check tools for proper calibration (sample check).<br>4 – Stores<br>• Do the stores meet the criteria in the procedures of the MOM?<br>• Check by sampling some items in the store for presence of proper documentation and any overdue items.<br>5 – Certification of maintenance<br>• Has maintenance on products and components been properly certified?<br>• Have implementation of modifications/repairs been carried out with appropriate approval of such modifications/repairs (sample check).<br>6 – Relations with the owners/operators<br>• Has maintenance been carried out with suitable work orders?<br>• When a contract has been signed with an owner/operator, has the obligations of the contracts been respected on each side?<br>7 – Personnel<br>• Check that the current accountable manager and other nominated persons are correctly identified in the approved MOM.<br>• If the number of personnel has decreased or if the activity has increased, check that the staff are still adequate to ensure a safe product. <br>• Check that the qualification of all new personnel (or personnel with new functions) has been appropriately assessed.<br>• Check that the staff have been trained, as necessary, to cover changes in:<br> o regulations,<br> o competent authority publications,<br> o the MOM and associated procedures,<br> o the products in the scope of work,<br> o maintenance data (significant ADs, SBs, etc.).<br>8 – Maintenance contracted<br>• Sample check of maintenance records:<br> o Existence and adequacy of the work order,<br> o Data received from the maintenance organisation:<br>  Valid CRS including any deferred maintenance,<br>  List of removed and installed equipment and copy of the associated Form 1 or equivalent. <br>• Obtain a copy of the current approval certificate (Form 3) of the maintenance organisations contracted.<br>9 – Maintenance sub-contracted<br>• Check that subcontractors for specialised services are properly controlled by the organisation;<br>10 – Technical records and record-keeping<br>• Have the maintenance actions been properly recorded?<br>• Have the certificates (Form 1 and Conformity certificates) been properly collected and recorded?<br>• Perform a sample check of technical records to ensure completeness and storage during the appropriate periods. <br>• Is storage of computerised data properly ensured?<br>11 – Occurrence reporting procedures<br>• Check that reporting is properly performed. <br>• Actions taken and recorded.

M.A.617 Changes to the approved maintenance organisation

  • In order to enable the competent authority to determine continued compliance with this Part, the approved maintenance organisation shall notify it of any proposal to carry out any of the following changes, before such changes take place:<br>1. the name of the organisation;<br>2. the location of the organisation;<br>3. additional locations of the organisation;<br>4. the accountable manager;<br>5. any of the persons specified in paragraph M.A.606(b);<br>6. the facilities, equipment, tools, material, procedures, work scope and certifying staff that could affect the approval.<br>In the case of proposed changes in personnel not known to the management beforehand, these changes shall be notified at the earliest opportunity.

  • AMC M.A.617 Changes to the approved maintenance organisation<br>The competent authority should be given adequate notification of any proposed changes in order to enable the maintenance organisation to remain approved if agreed by the competent authority during negotiations about any of the specified changes. Without this paragraph the approval would automatically be suspended in all cases.

M.A.618 Continued validity of approval

  • (a) An approval shall be issued for an unlimited duration. It shall remain valid subject to:<br>1. the organisation remaining in compliance with this Part, in accordance with the provisions related to the handling of findings as specified under M.A.619, and;<br>2. the competent authority being granted access to the organisation to determine continued compliance with this Part, and;<br>3. the approval not being surrendered or revoked;

  • (b) Upon surrender or revocation, the approval certificate shall be returned to the competent authority.

M.A.619 Findings

  • (a) A level 1 finding is any significant non-compliance with Part-M requirements which lowers the safety standard and hazards seriously the flight safety.

  • (b) A level 2 finding is any non-compliance with the Part-M requirements which could lower the safety standard and possibly hazard the flight safety.

  • (c) After receipt of notification of findings according to M.B.605, the holder of the maintenance organisation approval shall define a corrective action plan and demonstrate corrective action to the satisfaction of the competent authority within a period agreed with this authority.

SUBPART H - CERTIFICATE OF RELEASE TO SERVICE — CRS

M.A.801 Aircraft certificate of release to service

  • (a) Except for aircraft released to service by a maintenance organisation approved in accordance with Annex II (Part-145), the certificate of release to service shall be issued according to this Subpart;

  • (b) No aircraft can be released to service unless a certificate of release to service is issued at the completion of any maintenance, when satisfied that all maintenance required has been properly carried out, by:<br>1. appropriate certifying staff on behalf of the maintenance organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M); or<br>2. certifying staff in compliance with the requirements laid down in Annex III (Part-66), except for complex maintenance tasks listed in Appendix VII to this Annex for which point 1 applies; or<br>3. by the Pilot-owner in compliance with point M.A.803;

  • AMC M.A. 801 (b) Aircraft certificate of release to service<br>A certificate of release to service is necessary before flight, at the completion of any defect rectification, whilst the aircraft operates a flight between scheduled maintenance checks.

  • (c) By derogation from point M.A.801(b)2 for ELA1 aircraft not used in commercial air transport, aircraft complex maintenance tasks listed in Appendix VII may be released by certifying staff referred to in point M.A.801(b)2;

  • (d) By derogation from point M.A.801(b), in the case of unforeseen situations, when an aircraft is grounded at a location where no approved maintenance organisation appropriately approved under this Annex or Annex II (Part-145) and no appropriate certifying staff are available, the owner may authorise any person, with not less than three years of appropriate maintenance experience and holding the proper qualifications, to maintain according to the standards set out in Subpart D of this Annex and release the aircraft. The owner shall in that case:<br>1. obtain and keep in the aircraft records details of all the work carried out and of the qualifications held by that person issuing the certification; and<br>2. ensure that any such maintenance is rechecked and released by an appropriately authorised person referred to in point M.A.801(b) or an organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M), or with Annex II (Part-145) at the earliest opportunity but within a period not exceeding seven days; and<br>3. notify the organisation responsible for the continuing airworthiness management of the aircraft when contracted in accordance with point M.A.201(e), or the competent authority in the absence of such a contract, within seven days of the issuance of such certification authorisation;

  • AMC M.A.801 (d) Aircraft certificate of release to service<br>1. “3 years of appropriate maintenance experience” means 3 years working in an aircraft maintenance environment on at least some of the aircraft type systems corresponding to the aircraft endorsed on the aircraft maintenance license or on the certifying staff authorisation that the person holds.<br>2. “Holding the proper qualifications” means holding either:<br>a. a valid ICAO Annex 1 compliant maintenance license for the aircraft type requiring certification, or;<br>b. a certifying staff authorisation valid for the work requiring certification, issued by an ICAO Annex 6 approved maintenance organisation.<br>3. A release in accordance with this paragraph does not affect the controlled environment of the aircraft as long as the M.A.801(d)2 recheck<br>and release has been carried out by an approved maintenance organisation.

  • (e) In the case of a release to service in accordance with point M.A.801(b)2 or point M.A.801(c), the certifying staff may be assisted in the execution of the maintenance tasks by one or more persons subject to his/her direct and continuous control;

  • (f) A certificate of release to service shall contain as a minimum:<br>1. basic details of the maintenance carried out; and<br>2. the date such maintenance was completed; and<br>3. the identity of the organisation and/or person issuing the release to service, including:<br>(i) the approval reference of the maintenance organisation approved in accordance with Section A, Subpart F of this Annex (Part M) and the certifying staff issuing such a certificate; or<br>(ii) in the case of point M.A.801(b)2 or M.A.801(c) certificate of release to service, the identity and if applicable licence number of the certifying staff issuing such a certificate;<br>4. the limitations to airworthiness or operations, if any.

  • AMC M.A.801 (f) Aircraft certificate of release to service<br>1. The aircraft certificate of release to service should contain the following statement:<br>(a) 'Certifies that the work specified except as otherwise specified was carried out in accordance with Part-M and in respect to that work the aircraft is considered ready for release to service'.<br>(b) For a Pilot-owner a certificate of release to service should contain the following statement:<br>‘Certifies that the limited pilot-owner maintenance specified except as otherwise specified was carried out in accordance with Part M and in respect to that work the aircraft is considered ready for release to service’.<br>2. The certificate of release to service should relate to the task specified in the manufacturer's or operator's instruction or the aircraft maintenance programme which itself may cross-refer to a manufacturer's/operator's instruction in a maintenance manual, service bulletin etc.<br>3. The date such maintenance was carried out should include when the maintenance took place relative to any life or overhaul limitation in terms of date/flying hours/cycles/Iandings etc., as appropriate.<br>4. When extensive maintenance has been carried out, it is acceptable for the certificate of release to service to summarise the maintenance so long as there is a unique cross-reference to the work-pack containing full details of maintenance carried out. Dimensional information should be retained in the work-pack record.<br>5. The person issuing the certificate of release to service should use his normal signature except in the case where a computer release to service system is used. In this latter case the competent authority will need to be satisfied that only the particular person can electronically issue the release to service. One such method of compliance is the use of a magnetic or optical personal card in conjunction with a personal identity number (PIN) known only to the individual, which is keyed into the computer. A certification stamp is optional.<br>6. At the completion of all maintenance, owners, certifying staff, operators and maintenance organisations should ensure they have a clear, concise, legible record of the work performed.<br>7. In the case of an M.A.801 (b) 2 release to service, certifying staff should retain all records necessary to prove that all requirements have been met for the issuance of a certificate of release to service.

  • (g) By derogation from paragraph (b) and notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (h), when the maintenance prescribed cannot be completed, a certificate of release to service may be issued within the approved aircraft limitations. Such fact together with any applicable limitations of the airworthiness or the operations shall be entered in the aircraft certificate of release to service before its issue as part of the<br>information required in paragraph (f)4;

  • AMC M.A.801 (g) Aircraft certificate of release to service<br>1. Being unable to establish full compliance with sub-paragraph M.A.801 (b) means that the maintenance required by the aircraft owner or M.A. Subpart G organisation could not be completed due either to running out of available aircraft maintenance downtime for the scheduled check or by virtue of the condition of the aircraft requiring additional maintenance downtime.<br>2. The aircraft owner or M.A. Subpart G organisation is responsible for ensuring that all required maintenance has been carried out before flight. Therefore an aircraft owner or M.A. Subpart G organisation should be informed and agree to the deferment of full compliance with M.A. 801(b). The certificate of release to service may then be issued subject to details of the deferment, including the aircraft owner or M.A. Subpart G organisation authorisation, being endorsed on the certificate.<br>3. If a certificate of release to service is issued with incomplete maintenance a record should be kept stating what action the mechanic, supervisor and certifying staff should take to bring the matter to the attention of the relevant aircraft owner or M.A. Subpart G organisation so that the issue may be discussed and resolved with the aircraft owner or M.A. Subpart G organisation.

  • (h) A certificate of release to service shall not be issued in the case of any known non-compliance which endangers flight safety.

  • AMC M.A.801 (h) Aircraft certificate of release to service<br>‘Endangers flight safety’ means any instance where safe operation could not be assured or which could lead to an unsafe condition. It typically includes, but is not limited to, significant cracking, deformation, corrosion or failure of primary structure, any evidence of burning, electrical arcing, significant hydraulic fluid or fuel leakage and any emergency system or total system failure. An airworthiness directive overdue for compliance is also considered a hazard to flight safety.

M.A.802 Component certificate of release to service

  • (a) A certificate of release to service shall be issued at the completion of any maintenance carried out on an aircraft component in accordance with point M.A.502.

  • (b) The authorised release certificate identified as EASA Form 1 constitutes the component certificate of release to service, except when such maintenance on aircraft components has been performed in accordance with point M.A.502(b), point M.A.502(d) or point M.A.502(e) in which case the maintenance is subject to aircraft release procedures in accordance with point M.A.801

  • AMC M.A.802 Component certificate of release to service<br>When an approved organisation maintains an aircraft component for use by the organisation an EASA Form 1 may not be necessary depending upon the organisation’s internal release procedures, however all the information normally required for the EASA Form 1 should be adequately detailed in the certificate of release to service.

M.A.803 Pilot-owner authorisation

  • (a) To qualify as a Pilot-owner, the person must:<br>1. hold a valid pilot licence (or equivalent) issued or validated by a Member State for the aircraft type or class rating; and<br>2. own the aircraft, either as sole or joint owner; that owner must be:<br>(i) one of the natural persons on the registration form; or<br>(ii) a member of a non-profit recreational legal entity, where the legal entity is specified on the registration document as owner or operator, and that member is directly involved in the decision making process of the legal entity and designated by that legal entity to carry out Pilot-owner<br>maintenance.

  • (b) For any privately operated non-complex motor-powered aircraft of 2.730 kg MTOM and below, sailplane, powered sailplane or balloon, the Pilot-owner may issue a certificate of release to service after limited Pilotowner maintenance as specified in Appendix VIII.

  • (c) The scope of the limited Pilot-owner maintenance shall be specified in the aircraft maintenance programme referred to in point M.A.302.

  • (d) The certificate of release to service shall be entered in the logbooks and contain basic details of the maintenance carried out, the maintenance data used, the date on which that maintenance was completed and the identity, the signature and pilot licence number of the Pilot-owner issuing such a certificate.

  • AMC M.A.803 Pilot-owner authorisation<br>1. Privately operated means the aircraft is not operated pursuant to M.A.201 (h) and (i).<br>2. A Pilot-owner may only issue a certificate of release to service for maintenance he/she has performed.<br>3. In the case of a jointly-owned aircraft, the maintenance programme should list:<br>- The names of all Pilot-owners competent and designated to perform Pilot-owner maintenance in accordance with the basic principles described in Appendix VIII of Part-M. An alternative would be the maintenance programme to contain a procedure to ensure how such a list of competent Pilot-owners should be managed separately and kept current.<br>- The limited maintenance tasks they may perform.<br>4. An equivalent valid Pilot-owner license may be any document attesting a pilot qualification recognised by the Member State. It does not have to be necessarily issued by the competent authority, but it should in any case be issued in accordance with the particular Member State’s system, awaiting the European pilot licensing system. In such a case, the equivalent certificate or qualification number should be used instead of the pilot's licence number for the purpose of the M.A.801(b)3 (certificate of release to service).

Appendix VIII Limited Pilot Owner Maintenance

  • Has Pilot Owner Maintenance been performed and reported to CAMO?

  • Appendix VIII Limited Pilot Owner Maintenance<br>In addition to the requirements laid down in Annex I (Part M), the following basic principles are to be complied with before any maintenance task is carried out under the terms of Pilot-owner maintenance:<br>(a) Competence and responsibility<br>1. The Pilot-owner is always responsible for any maintenance that he performs.<br>2. Before carrying out any Pilot-owner maintenance tasks, the Pilot-owner must satisfy himself that he is competent to do the task. It is the<br>responsibility of Pilot-owners to familiarize themselves with the standard maintenance practices for their aircraft and with the aircraft<br>maintenance programme. If the Pilot-owner is not competent for the task to be carried out, the task cannot be released by the Pilot-owner.<br>3. The Pilot-owner (or his contracted continuing airworthiness management organisation referred to in Subpart G, Section A of this Annex) is responsible for identifying the Pilot-owner tasks according to these basic principles in the maintenance programme and for ensuring that<br>the document is updated in a timely manner.<br>4. The approval of the maintenance programme has to be carried out in accordance with point M.A.302.<br><br>(b) Tasks<br>The Pilot-owner may carry out simple visual inspections or operations to check for general condition and obvious damage and normal operation of the airframe, engines, systems and components.<br>Maintenance tasks shall not be carried out by the Pilot-owner when the task:<br>1. is critically safety related, whose incorrect performance will drastically affect the airworthiness of the aircraft or is a flight safety sensitive<br>maintenance task as specified in point M.A.402(a) and/or;<br>2. requires the removal of major components or major assembly and/or;<br>3. is carried out in compliance with an Airworthiness Directive or an Airworthiness Limitation Item, unless specifically allowed in the AD or the<br>ALI and/or;<br>4. requires the use of special tools, calibrated tools (except torque wrench and crimping tool) and/or;<br>5. requires the use of test equipments or special testing (e.g. NDT, system tests or operational checks for avionic equipment) and/or;<br>6. is composed of any unscheduled special inspections (e.g. heavy landing check) and/or;<br>7. is effecting systems essential for the IFR operations and/or;<br>8. is listed in Appendix VII or is a component maintenance task in accordance with points M.A.502(a), (b), (c) or (d).<br>The criteria 1 to 8 listed above can not be overridden by less restrictive instructions issued in accordance with “M.A.302(d) Maintenance Programme”.<br>Any task described in the aircraft flight manual as preparing the aircraft for flight (Example: assembling the glider wings or pre-flight), is considered to be a pilot task and is not considered a Pilot-owner maintenance task and therefore does not require a Certificate of Release to Service.<br><br>(c) Performance of the maintenance Pilot-owner tasks and records<br>The maintenance data as specified in point M.A.401 must be always available during the conduct of Pilot-owner maintenance and must be complied with. Details of the data referred to in the conduct of Pilot-owner maintenance must be included in the Certificate of Release to Service in accordance with point M.A.803(d).<br>The Pilot-owner must inform the approved continuing airworthiness management organisation responsible for the continuing airworthiness of the aircraft (if applicable) not later than 30 days after completion of the Pilot-owner maintenance task in accordance with point M.A.305(a).’

  • <br>AMC to Appendix VIII “Limited Pilot Owner Maintenance”<br>1. The lists here below specify items that can be expected to be completed by an owner who holds a current and valid pilot licence for the aircraft type involved and who meets the competence and responsibility requirements of Appendix VIII to Part-M.<br>2. The list of tasks may not address in a detailed manner the specific needs of the various aircraft categories. In addition, the development of technology and the nature of the operations undertaken by these categories of aircraft cannot be always adequately considered.<br>3. Therefore, the following lists are considered to be the representative scope of limited Pilot-owner maintenance referred to in M.A.803 and Appendix VIII:<br>• Part A applies to aeroplanes;<br>• Part B applies to rotorcraft;<br>• Part C applies to sailplanes and powered sailplanes;<br>• Part D applies to balloons and airships.<br>4. Inspection tasks/checks of any periodicity included in an approved maintenance programme can be carried out providing that the specified tasks are included in the generic lists of Parts A to D of this AMC and remains compliant with Part-M Appendix VIII basic principles.<br>The content of periodic inspections/checks as well as their periodicity is not regulated or standardised in an aviation specification. It is the decision of the manufacturer/Type Certificate Holder (TCH) to recommend a schedule for each specific type of inspection/check.<br>For an inspection/check with the same periodicity for different TCHs, the content may differ, and in some cases may be critically safety-related and may need the use of special tools or knowledge and thus would not qualify for Pilot-owner maintenance. Therefore, the maintenance carried out by the Pilot-owner cannot be generalised to specific inspections such as 50 Hrs, 100 Hrs or 6 Month periodicity.<br>The Inspections to be carried out are limited to those areas and tasks listed in this AMC to Appendix VIII; this allows flexibility in the development of the maintenance programme and does not limit the inspection to certain specific periodic inspections. A 50 Hrs/6 Month periodic inspection for a fixed wing aeroplane as well as the one-year inspection on a glider may normally be eligible for Pilot-owner maintenance.<br>TABLES<br>Note: Tasks in Part A or Part B shown with ** exclude IFR operations following Pilot-owner maintenance. For these aircraft to operate under IFR operations, these tasks should be released by an appropriate licensed engineer.<br>(Tabeller kan ses i Part M)<br>

Finalization.

  • Representative for organization.

  • Lead Auditor.

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