A: Leadership

A1: Health and safety policy

Basic

  • A policy exists and is up to date.

  • The policy is available to staff and students.

  • The policy is signed by the senior manager (if at an institutional level this should be the most senior manager).

  • The policy contains a commitment to compliance with relevant health and safety legislation.

  • The policy contains a commitment to the provision of a safe and healthy working
    environment.

  • The policy makes a commitment to the prevention of injury and ill health in the workplace.

Substantial

  • The policy defines key safety related roles and responsibilities.

  • The policy is formally reviewed at an appropriate frequency.

  • The policy makes an explicit commitment to improving health and safety performance with reference to measures of performance.

  • There is a formal system through which the policy is communicated to all staff and students.

  • functions are explicitly linked to the institution's health and safety policy.

  • A person with authority within the function coordinates and monitors policy implementation.

High

  • A formal and fundamental review of the policy is periodically undertaken in consultation with appropriate members of the workforce.

  • The policy is supported by strategic plans and health and safety objectives.

  • The policy forms an integral part of the health and safety management system.

A2: Management commitment and engagement

Basic

  • Managers are aware of their responsibilities and legal duties.

  • Managers can demonstrate an understanding of the hazards present in the work area for which they are responsible.

  • If there are examples of health and safety issues arising, managers have supported the development of a solution in a timely manner.

  • Managers attend a meeting or forum at which health and safety issues are discussed.

  • Managers provide adequate resources where additional controls are identified through risk assessment or following revisions to guidance and standards.

Substantial

  • A senior leader is formally given the responsibility for the management of health and safety within the function and this individual is aware of this aspect of their role.

  • Resources are made available for health and safety.

  • Managers attend formal health and safety meetings with an appropriate group of attendees. A senior manager chairs these meetings.

  • Leaders have attended Health and safety training.

  • Engagement of senior leaders in health and safety issues is visible to staff at all levels within the function.

  • Individuals with key health and safety responsibilities are adequately supported, specifically with respect to the time and training required to fulfil the role.

High

  • Any local health and safety management structure is consistent with and links to the institution's health and safety management structure.

  • There are systems in place to facilitate the reporting of health and safety issues to senior leaders.

  • Where deficiencies in health and safety have wider learning value the findings have been shared with other functions or areas.

  • Opportunities are taken to seek and adopt learning from external institutions or bodies.

A3: Risk profile

Basic

  • The Head of the function can describe the significant hazards present within their function.

  • The hazards recognised by the Head of the function are consistent with those dealt with in section D10 (hazard and risk register).

Substantial

  • There is a formally maintained document accurately depicting the risk profile of the function.

  • There is a mechanism in place to trigger a review of the risk profile at appropriate intervals and following appropriate or significant changes.

High

  • There is a systematic method for the production of a risk profile.

  • The production and review of risk profiles within the function are consistent with the institution's procedures/ codes of practice.

  • There is a formal communication of the function risk profile to the institution's management.

A4: Objective setting

Basic

  • Health and safety objectives are set.

  • Managers with health and safety objectives know and understand them.

Substantial

  • The function has a formal health and safety plan which is forward looking and is used to identify health and safety objectives.

  • Health and safety objectives are determined through a process of gap analysis and are relevant to the function.

  • Metrics are in place for the management of health and safety objectives.

  • Managers with health and safety objectives are held accountable for their delivery.

  • Health and safety objectives are consistent across the function.

High

  • Health and objectives are consistent with and are linked to the institutional objectives.

  • Comments:

B: Planning for emergencies

B5: Critical incident managementBasic

Basic

  • The findings of risk assessments have led to the identification of potential critical incidents.

  • Critical incidents have been recognised and are known.

  • Staff are aware of the action to take if an emergency occurs.

Substantial

  • There is a list of the critical incidents or residual risks.

  • A documented critical incident plan has been developed and is in place.

  • Relevant staff are aware of the critical incident plan.

  • The critical incident plan is reviewed after all critical incidents and updated as necessary.

High

  • The critical incident plan is linked to business continuity plans and is regularly reviewed by a competent person.

  • A business impact analysis has been undertaken to measure the impact of the identified emergencies.

B6: Procedures for immediate response

Basic

  • There are procedures to deal with critical incidents in the area.

  • There is equipment available to deal with any identified emergencies.

  • Staff have been trained to respond to emergencies.

Substantial

  • There are written procedures for all emergencies identified in the critical incident plan.

  • The equipment and resources for each type of emergency are identified and available.

  • Staff in the area have been trained in the correct procedure for all relevant emergency and this is recorded.

  • There are identified disposal/ decontamination protocols for equipment used to deal with emergencies.

  • Staff are aware of how to gain access to specialist advice.

  • The equipment used for emergencies is regularly inspected and tested.

High

  • The written procedures for emergencies include how and when to escalate each type of incident.

  • The procedures for emergencies are tested periodically to ensure their effectiveness, with support from external agencies as appropriate.

B7: Procedures for recovery

Basic

  • There are procedures for recommencement of work following an emergency.

  • Arrangements are in place to notify staff of the procedures for recovery.

  • There is a method of recording the nature of the emergency and the outcomes.

Substantial

  • There are written procedures for the immediate and short term recovery of work areas and activities following emergency incidents.

  • Staff are aware of the process for recovery after a major incident.

  • All staff responsible for activities have been trained in the recovery procedures.

  • There are agreed arrangements for how other areas are required to respond to/ assist with recovery from the emergency.

High

  • Recovery plans for the area are linked to the institutional business recovery plans.

  • The business recovery plans are available remotely from the site.

  • Debriefs take place after incidents and lessons learnt are shared.

  • Comments:

C: Health and safety arrangements

  • This indicator is intended to allow you to explore the structures and systems which your institution has in place. The word 'arrangements' refers to things like committees, key safety critical jobs and written procedures. The division of this indicator into two themes is intended to differentiate between those arrangements determined and defined at an institutional level and those determined and defined at a local level.

C8: Institutional arrangements

Basic

  • Arrangements are in place for the assessment and control of significant hazards.

  • There is some framework of health and safety responsibilities and key individuals understand their position within it.

  • There are meetings conducted at various levels within the institution, during which health and safety is discussed.

Substantial

  • Health and safety responsibilities are clearly defined for all relevant roles.

  • Arrangements state that individuals in safety critical posts have an appropriate level of authority and competency.

  • Formal institutional arrangements are in place for the assessment and control of all workplace hazards.

  • There is a system in place to manage all documents in which institutional safety arrangements are described.

  • Arrangements are formally reviewed at an appropriate frequency.

  • A consistent health and safety committee structure is defined for the institution.

High

  • A formal document control system has been adopted and is comprehensively used.

  • Competency requirements have been determined for all staff with health and safety responsibilities.

  • Where appropriate, reviews of procedures include gap analysis and formal consultation.

  • There are arrangements in place between the institution and partner organisations.

C9: Local arrangements

Basic

  • Arrangements are in place for the assessment and control of significant risks.

  • There is a written protocol describing the controls to be adopted for all significant risks.

  • Key individuals with safety critical roles are identified and understand their duties.

Substantial

  • The roles and responsibilities for key individuals are defined and individuals are formally appointed where required.

  • Arrangements state that individuals in safety critical posts have an appropriate level of authority and competency.

  • Formal arrangements are in place for the assessment and control of all significant hazards present in the workplace.

  • All local arrangements must be consistent with institutional arrangements.

  • There is a system in place to manage documents for all local safety arrangements.

  • Local arrangements are formally reviewed at an appropriate frequency.

  • There is a local, formally convened health and safety committee or health and safety is an agenda item on another committee/ meeting.

  • Local arrangements are consulted upon during their development.

  • Local arrangements for the assessment of risk are of a consistent format and follow consistent methodologies.

High

  • A formal document control system is used.

  • Competency requirements have been determined and are stated for all staff with health and safety responsibilities.

  • Comments:

D: Risk assessment and control

  • This indicator is intended to allow you to explore the structures and systems which your institution has in place. The word 'arrangements' refers to things like committees, key safety critical jobs and written procedures. The division of this indicator into two themes is intended to differentiate between those arrangements determined and defined at an institutional level and those determined and defined at a local level.

D10: Hazard and risk register

Basic

  • Managers within the function can identify relevant hazards present in the workplace.

Substantial

  • Hazards and risks within the function are identified and recorded in a maintained risk register.

High

  • The control of risks is commensurate with their significance.

  • The significant risks from the function are communicated to the institutional risk register owner.

D11: Arrangements for risk assessment

Basic

  • Some procedures exist for the assessment of risk.

Substantial

  • A formal methodology exists for the assessment of risks. This must contain the following elements:
    • a means of determining the level of risk (threshold of significance)
    • a definition of who may authorise an assessment
    • the adoption of a hierarchy of controls in determining workplace controls
    • the participation of appropriate stakeholders.

  • The arrangements must stipulate the risk assessments are reviewed:
    • periodically
    • following accidents or incidents
    • when the task has significantly changed.

  • Risk assessment arrangements must incorporate mechanisms for consultation of competent persons.

  • Training needs are defined for individuals undertaking and authorising risk assessments.

High

  • There is a document control system for risk assessments.

  • There is a formal requirement to peer review risk assessments in complex cases.

  • There is a system for recording the training given to all individuals undertaking and authorising risk assessments.

  • Systems are in place to check that control measures are consistent with stipulated
    standards.

D12: Application of risk assessment arrangements

Basic

  • Sources of imminent danger/ acute ill health have been subject to risk assessment and a record of the assessment exists.

  • Controls have been identified for sources of imminent danger/ acute ill health and are designed to fail safe in order to mitigate serious consequences.

  • Staff and students are aware of workplace controls.

  • Persons at risk are identified.

Substantial

  • The formal risk assessment process adopted by the function has been applied to all activities/ tasks that pose a significant risk.

  • Specified controls are consistent with relevant standards and guidance.

  • Risk assessments are up to date and authorised.

  • Appropriate people have been involved in the creation of the assessment and determination of controls.

  • The level of detail contained in risk assessments is commensurate with the level of risk associated with the task.

High

  • Risk assessments are incorporated into a document control system.

  • Risk assessments relating to highly significant hazards have been subject to peer review where appropriate.

  • Training records exist for individuals undertaking and authorising risk assessments.

  • Actions arising out of risk assessments are assigned to named individuals and given suitable timescales.

D13: Implementation of controls

Basic

  • Staff and students are aware of the workplace controls that apply to them.

  • Workplace controls are implemented and effectively controlling sources of imminent danger.

  • Workplace controls meet legislative requirements.

  • Personal protective equipment stipulated as necessary is judged to be appropriate, available and in good condition

Substantial

  • Workplace controls detailed in risk assessments including foreseeable incidents/ accidents/ emergencies or events are being consistently applied.

  • Where the risk assessment requires a safe system of work to be adopted, it will cover:
    • specific control measures
    • provision and recording of suitable training
    • supervision.
    The requirements outlined in the safe system of work have been implemented.

High

  • Workplace controls are proportionate to the level of risk and implemented in a manner that does not in itself cause any additional hazards.

  • Actions are monitored and registered as complete.

  • Comments:

E: Health and safety competency

  • This indicator is intended to allow you to consider both the training and competencies requirements within your institution. Training refers to the practice of providing training courses, workshops, coaching, mentoring, or other learning opportunities to employees and students to inspire, challenge, and motivate them to perform the functions of their position to the best of their ability and within set standards. Competency refers to the ability of a person to successfully apply health and safety skills, knowledge and training in the context of contractor, staff, student's roles and/ or activities.

E14: Health and safety training

Basic

  • Minimum levels of health and safety training have been identified.

  • Staff, students and contractors are provided with a minimum level of information about health and safety on their arrival.

  • There is an ongoing training programme in place.

  • Staff with key health and safety roles are provided with training or instruction.

Substantial

  • Structured analysis of training needs has led to the development of a training matrix (training needs analysis).

  • There is training that addresses identified health and safety training needs.

  • Training records are in place and maintained.

  • An annual review of training needs is undertaken.

  • Training needs are reviewed after any relevant accident and incident or when the task has significantly changed.

High

  • There is a procedure detailing the arrangements for recording training and maintaining records.

  • There is a systematic way of keeping training records.

E15: Health and safety competency

Basic

  • The health and safety competency of individuals is developed through supervision and instruction.

  • There is a way of recognising where competency already exists.

  • The competency of staff in safety critical roles has been assessed and approved by line managers.

  • In areas where health and safety is critical, there are arrangements to ensure suitable cover for staff absences.

  • Contractors are assessed before appointment.

Substantial

  • Health and safety competencyc of contractors is formally assessed prior to appointment.

  • There are records of health and safety competency checks or methods of signing off staff as competent.

  • Managers and staff have access to health and safety advice and assistance relevant to the hazard and risk profile from a competent person.

  • Competency is assessed prior to appointment of staff with key health and safety roles.

  • There are competency criteria for safety critical activities.

  • There are systems for identifying areas where health and safety competency needs to be improved.

High

  • Health and Safety competencys have been defined and are maintained for all staff groups.

  • There are checks that people signing off staff as competent have a higher level of experience, skills or knowledge.

  • The health and safety advice and assistance is provided by competent individuals who have sufficient authority and independence.

  • There is a procedure detailing the institution's (institutional or local) arrangements for setting and determining competency.

  • Comments:

F: Communication

F16: Institutional communication

Basic

  • Staff are aware of relevant health and safety arrangements.

  • Emergency services have been supplied with appropriate information.

  • Information coming from sources external to the institution is being communicated appropriately within the institution.

  • There is a system for key managers to be made aware of significant failings in the management of health and safety.

Substantial

  • There is a system in place for the communication of health and safety arrangements within the institution.

  • There is a system that responds to requests for information from emergency services.

  • There is a mechanism in place by which information from external parties can be communicated and, where relevant, this has been used.

  • Formal arrangements for the communication of health and safety performance are documented.

High

  • The system used for communication of health and safety arrangements includes a step which demonstrates that the most up to date versions have been communicated to the appropriate audience.

  • There is a formal requirement that communication needs are periodically assessed and the effectiveness of communications is evaluated.

  • There is a documented process that enables external communication (i.e. enforcement notices) to be escalated.

F17: Local communication

Basic

  • Point of use information is readily available.

  • Staff are aware of the content of safe systems of work.

  • Changes to risk assessments are communicated to the staff following reviews or updates.

  • Information has been supplied to the emergency services where necessary.

  • There is a system for key managers to be made aware of significant failings in the management of health and safety.

Substantial

  • There is a system in place to ensure relevant health and safety information on arrangements is communicated to staff and students.

  • There is a system in place that requires the provision of relevant information to the emergency services.

  • There is a mechanism in place by which information from external parties can be communicated and where relevant this has been used.

High

  • The system used for communication of health and safety arrangements demonstrates that the most up to date versions have been communicated to the appropriate audience.

  • The communication system itself stipulates that communication needs are periodically assessed and its effectiveness evaluated.

  • Documented processes for setting out the communication routes are in place.

  • Local communication systems are consistent with those of the institution.

  • Comments:

G: Consultation

G18: Institutional consultation

Basic

  • Consultation on health and safety takes place between senior managers and employee representatives.

  • Staff health and safety representatives are afforded adequate time and resources to fulfil their role.

  • Staff health and safety representatives are appropriately trained to allow them to make an informed contribution on health and safety issues.

Substantial

  • There is an institutional requirement that health and safety committees are formally convened for consultation and are minuted.

  • The institution stipulates the membership requirements, terms of reference, broad agenda items and meeting frequency of health and safety committees, and these are consistent with relevant guidance.

  • The health and safety committees are involved in reviewing institutional objectives and health and safety plans and establishing performance measures.

High

  • The health and safety consultation system is consistent across the institution.

  • The institution requires a periodic review of its own arrangements around consultation.

G19: Local consultation

Basic

  • Consultation takes place between managers and employee representatives on relevant matters.

  • Staff health and safety representatives are afforded adequate time and resources to fulfil their role.

  • Staff health and safety representatives are appropriately trained to allow them to make an informed contribution on health and safety issues.

  • Staff are consulted about health and safety issues that directly affect them.

Substantial

  • There is a formally convened health and safety committee meeting.

  • The formal health and safety committees have terms of reference that are subject to review.

  • The formal health and safety committees have minutes or records of meeting outcomes.

  • The local health and safety committees are involved in reviewing institutional/ local health and safety plans and establishing local performance measures.

  • Managers encourage their staff to participate in the consultation processes especially in regards to risk assessment and development of local controls.

High

  • Locally convened health and safety meetings are consistent with the institution's arrangements.

  • Comments;

H: Health and safety monitoring

H20: Inspection / audit

Basic

  • Staff complete day-to-day (regular) checks.

  • Inspections are undertaken by the owner of the risk.

  • Formal inspections are undertaken once a year by a supervisor / manager, and result in a basic list of actions.

  • General checklist/ aid memoire used.

Substantial

  • Defined schedule for past and future inspections is in place based upon the risk profile; the schedule is followed.

  • Records of local inspections exist.

  • Other staff are involved, as appropriate to the risk profile of the area being inspected.

  • Checklists are targeted to specific areas/ hazards.

  • An action plan is produced following inspection.

  • Equipment/ resources required for monitoring are available.

  • Equipment used for monitoring is calibrated and records maintained as required.

  • Self-audits against any of the function's activities/ procedures are taking place.

High

  • Individuals independent to the function will be involved in the inspections.

  • Significant findings from inspections are discussed at health and safety committee and management meetings.

  • A procedure is in place to determine the frequency and scope of monitoring requirements.

  • Audits are undertaken by staff or external bodies which are independent of the function.

H21: Action tracking

Basic

  • Immediate action has been taken to resolve serious hazards/ risk.

  • Records of remedial actions are available.

Substantial

  • Actions are identified from monitoring activities.

  • Measures to prevent recurrence (where actions identify non-conformities) are taken.

  • Actions are allocated to specific individuals and timescales for completion are set.

  • Adequate resources are made available to rectify identified actions.

  • There is a system for recording and tracking the status of actions until completed.

High

  • The status of actions is reported upon at health and safety committee and management meetings.

  • There is a formal escalation procedure for when actions are not completed.

H22: Statutory checks (equipment)

Basic

  • There is understanding of what equipment within the function requires statutory inspection, testing or examination.

  • All equipment requiring statutory inspection, testing or examination is identifiable.

  • Responsibilities for those arranging and undertaking statutory inspection, testing or examination are defined and understood.

  • Statutory inspection, testing or examination is being undertaken.

  • Records of statutory inspection, testing or examination period(s) are being maintained.

  • Systems are in place to immediately remove from service defective (safety critical) work equipment. Such equipment should be locked off, isolated, removed and/ or labelled, as appropriate.

Substantial

  • Actions arising from statutory inspection, testing or examination are completed.

  • Records of actions/ repairs are maintained.

  • Processes are in place to update records whenever new equipment requiring statutory inspection, testing or examination is introduced or when relevant equipment is disposed of.

  • A system is in place to enable users to identify if equipment is within its statutory inspection, testing or examination period.

  • A system is in place for staff to notify specific person(s) if equipment has exceeded its statutory inspection, testing or examination period.

  • A system is in place to check records of statutory inspection, testing or examination are up to date.

High

  • Records of statutory inspection, testing or examination are formally reviewed on an annual basis to ensure they include all relevant equipment and checks.

  • Staff are appointed to have control/ ownership of equipment or processes.

  • A procedure on the management of equipment requiring statutory inspection, testing or examination is in place.

H23: Data collection and analysis

Basic

  • Data regarding health and safety performance is collected.

Substantial

  • Health and safety data is reviewed to establish trends or patterns.

  • There is a mechanism in place to use the information from the review of health and safety data.

High

  • Results from data analysis are used for planning and objective setting.

  • Attainment of health and safety objectives is monitored.

  • Guidance includes the system to be used for data collection and analysis.

  • Comments:

I: Accident and incidents

I24: Accident and incident arrangements

Basic

  • A system is in place to record accidents / incidents.

  • A system is in place to identify, record and report ‘RIDDOR reportable’ accidents.

  • Information is gathered and recorded following significant accidents or incidents.

Substantial

  • There is a suitable system for the collection of accident/ incident data.

  • There is a system in place by which accidents can be reported and this is accessible and communicated to all staff.

  • Accident reporting arrangements include a definition as to the types of accidents and incidents which should be reported and give appropriate timescales in which reports should be made.

  • Staff are encouraged to report ‘near misses’.

  • There is a system in place to:
    • record instances of work-related ill health
    • refer staff to an occupational health service.

  • Following accidents and incidents, there is a formal procedure for carrying out an investigation.

  • There is a formal requirement to periodically review accident and incident data including trend analysis.

  • Training requirements for individuals carrying out accident/ incident investigations must be specified and there must be a system for recording these.

  • The arrangements for reporting accidents, incidents and work-related ill health include an appropriate escalation procedure.

  • There are arrangements in place for recording work related sickness absence.

High

  • There is a system in place for the sharing of wider learning arising from accident/ incident investigations with appropriate sections of the Institution.

  • The accident/ incident data is controlled.

  • Senior managers and staff representatives participate in accident/ incident investigations above a defined threshold.

I25: Compliance with arrangements

Basic

  • There is some response to accidents and incidents that seeks to prevent a further similar occurrence.

  • There is a record of any 3-day lost time accidents/ incidents.

  • There is evidence that RIDDOR reporting criteria are being applied and reports submitted.

Substantial

  • Accidents and incidents are being reported in accordance with the function's arrangements.

  • There are records of 'near misses'.

  • Investigations have been completed to a satisfactory standard.

  • Periodic review of accident and incident data has been carried out in accordance with the function's arrangements.

  • Work-related ill health is being recorded in accordance with the function's arrangements.

  • Occupational health referrals are being made in accordance with the function's arrangements.

  • Work related sickness absence is being recorded in accordance with the function's arrangements.

  • There are records of dangerous occurrences should they have occurred.

High

  • Examples of wider learning from accidents and incidents exist.

  • Training records for individuals carrying out investigations are up to date.

  • Work related sickness absence is being monitored.

I26: Conduct of investigations

Basic

  • People undertaking investigations are competent.

  • Investigations have been carried out following RIDDOR reportable accidents/ incidents.

  • Investigations have identified causal factors.

  • Remedial actions have been put in place where identified as necessary following an accident or incident.

  • The outcome of investigations is reported locally.

Substantial

  • Investigations are carried out in accordance with the function's arrangements, i.e.:
    • involve relevant people
    • carried out in a timely manner
    • determine causal factors and remedial actions.

  • Investigations are proportionate to the potential seriousness of the accident/ incident/ level of harm/ litigation.

  • Records of investigations are kept in accordance with the institution's document retention requirements.

  • The outcome of investigations has been reported to relevant local managers.

High

  • Senior managers and staff representatives have participated in investigations in accordance with the function's arrangements.

  • There is evidence of wider learning being appropriately disseminated.

  • Relevant leaders are aware of the following;
    • The threshold above which senior managers
    and staff representatives must participate in
    investigations
    • The route by which wider learning is
    disseminated.

  • Learning derived from accidents and incidents occurring outside the function has been sought and applied.

  • Comments:

J: Review

J27: Review

Basic

  • Performance has been checked in terms of any aspects of the health and safety management system.

  • Reviews have been carried out and documented.

  • Reviews include a summary of accident and incident data.

  • Managers of the function have been involved in producing and signing off reviews of the performance of the function.

  • There is guidance on when reviews are carried out and by whom.

Substantial

  • Reviews have been reported/ received by and discussed by the senior management team of the function.

  • Underlying causes and trends affecting performance are considered.

  • Reviews consider changes in pertinent health and safety related legislation.

  • Reviews include data on work related ill health.

  • The guidance clarifies what should be evaluated as part of the review (inputs and outputs).

High

  • The relevance and appropriateness of the standards and objectives to which the function is working are considered in the review.

  • The guidance requires:
    • Assessments of performance against objective
    and plans
    • The guidance requires assessments of
    performance of the health and safety
    management system
    • A written response to the review by the senior
    manager.

J28: Improvement planning

Basic

  • There is evidence that remedial actions are being set and are being completed.

  • The findings from reviews are communicated to other managers, staff or their representatives.

  • Progress against objectives and plans are reported.

Substantial

  • The extent of completion of actions arising from the review is reported.

  • Good practice identified in reviews is highlighted to staff and students.

  • Shortcomings identified in reviews have resulted, as relevant, in revision of standards, policies or strategies, objectives and plans.

High

  • The outputs from the management review include decisions and actions relating to possible changes in the function's or institution's:
    • health and safety policy
    • objectives
    • resources
    • health and safety performance
    • other elements of the OH&S management system, and
    • consistent with the commitment to continual improvement.

  • Comments:

K: Statutory Compliance (Property)

K1: Asbestos Management

  • Is the Duty Holder responsable for any premises where there is the potential for asbestos, i.e. pre 2000 build properties?

  • Is there a suitable and sufficient asbestos management surveys for the premises?

  • When was the Management Survey Undertaken?

  • Is there an asbestos Management Plan?

  • Date Created:

  • Scheduled Review Date:

  • Are relevant persons provided with appropriate training?

  • Where identified is there a programme for monitoring the condition of ACM's?

  • Are there suitable arrangements on site for the sharing of asbestos information (i.e. contractors and in house maintenance staff)?

  • Are suitable arrangements in place to manage actions identified in the most recent Management Plan?

K2: Water Management

  • Type of water systems:

  • Has a suitable and sufficient assessment been undertaken of water system?

  • If water towers are present, have they been registered to the USE?

  • Are suitable procedures in place to manage water systems, including management controls identified in the control strategy?

  • Are records up to date and avaliable for inspection?

  • Are there suitable arrangements on site to manage remedial actions?

K3: Local Exhaust Ventilation Systems (LEV)

K4: Fire Safety Management

  • Is there a suitable and sufficient fire risk assessment for premises?

  • FRA Completed by:

  • Date FRA Completed:

  • Scheduled Review Date:

K5: Radiation Risk

K6: Electrical Safety

K7: Gas Safety

K8: Pressure Systems

K9: Hazadouns Substances

K10: Confined Space

K11: Play Equipment

K12: Lifting Equipment

K13: Trees and Landscape

K14: Maintenance and Inspection

K15: Transport

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