Audit

Means of Escape from Buildings

Evacuation Routes- All Buildings

1. Are evacuation routes clear of obstructions?

• The owner/occupier must ensure that no thing impedes or obstructs travel on the evacuation route.
• The regulation defines a thing that may impede or obstruct travel as a vehicle, an animal, fixtures or fittings,
goods or materials. It may also include people.
• An evacuation route is the path a person would take to exit the building. It is usually marked with exit signage.
An evacuation route includes the space above the path of travel. An evacuation route must be indicated on the
evacuation diagram (refer to items 9 and 44 for further details regarding evacuation diagrams).
• Evacuation routes must be a minimum of one metre wide.
• A final exit must lead directly to a road or open space and where people are safe from the effects of a fire or
hazardous materials emergency in the building
• Evacuation routes start in common areas, not inside units, meeting rooms or individual offices. A common area is
a passageway, stairway, corridor or mall.
This item relates to Section 8 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

2. Are final exits clear of obstructions for two metres?

• The owner/occupier must ensure a clear evacuation route for two metres outside the final exit of the building (i.e. that no thing impedes or obstructs travel for two metres outside the final exit).
• A final exit door is the last exit door from the building.
• A final exit door must lead directly to a place of safety outside the building or open space and where people are
safe from the effects of fire or hazardous materials emergency in the building.
• The regulation defines a thing that may impede or obstruct travel as a vehicle, an animal, fixtures or fittings,
goods or materials. It may also include people.
This item relates to Section 8 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

3. Are the final exits of any adjoining properties clear?

• The occupier of one building must not block the final exit from a neighbouring building or tenancy.
• The owner/occupier must ensure that the final exits of the adjoining property are clear (i.e. that no thing impedes
or obstructs travel for two metres outside the final exit).
• A final exit door is the last exit door from the neighbouring building or tenancy and leads to a place of safety
without any further impediments such as locked gates.
• The regulation defines a thing that may impede or obstruct travel as a vehicle, an animal, fixtures or fittings,
goods or materials. It may also include people. (An example of a thing obstructing travel would be placing a rubbish skip within two metres of a neighbouring tenant’s final exit).
This item relates to Section 9 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Exit Doors

4. Is the door hardware the correct type?

• Exit doors are doors that are in the evacuation route or are doors at the final exit of the building.
• Exit doors must be opened by a single handed downward or pushing action on a single device.
• Lever type handles or panic bars are the only acceptable door hardware for exit doors.
• Barrel bolts are not illegal providing they are locked in the open position when the building is occupied.
• Knob type handles are not acceptable door hardware for exit doors.
• Automatic opening doors that open on activation of the fire detection system are acceptable, providing if they fail they can be manually opened with a force of 110 Newtons (the force required to lift 11 kilograms) or less.
• Sliding doors, if approved, are acceptable. Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) recommend that an arrow showing the direction of slide and signage indicating slide to open be attached to the door.

This item relates to Sections 10 and 11 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008

Corrective & Preventative Action

5. Are the doors along the excavation route unlocked/ unobstructed?

The owner/occupier must ensure doors on evacuation routes are not locked if people are known to be in the building.
• Doors on evacuation routes must be able to be opened by a single handed downward or pushing action on a single device. Knob type handles are not acceptable door hardware for these doors.
The door hardware of buildings used as detention centres, mental health facilities, child care centres (including Prep and After-School Care where full-time adults are present) and secure parts of banks, are required to comply with the Building Code of Australia, Part D2.21.
• Where special door locking arrangements are in place the method of operation and the information provided to staff/occupants is required to be retained in the evacuation coordination procedures, which must be kept with the fire and evacuation plan. (For more information regarding fire and evacuation plans refer to item 44).
This item relates to Sections 10, 11 and 12 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008

Corrective & Preventative Action

Fire/ Smoke Doors and Walls

6. are the fire/ smoke doors unobstructed and undamaged?

The owner/occupier must ensure that fire/smoke doors are not obstructed nor damaged.
• Fire or smoke doors are not to be ‘chocked’ or held open. Fire doors must automatically close
and fully latch after each opening.
• An exception to this is when the door is held open by a device connected to the buildings fire
alarm system that allows the door to close on activation of a fire alarm.
This item relates to Section 13 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008. See the Queensland Development
Code MP 6.1 at: www.hpw.qld.gov.au/construction/BuildingPlumbing/Building/BuildingLawsCodes/ QueenslandDevelopmentCode/Pages/QueenslandDevelopmentCodeCurrentParts.aspx for further details regarding maintenance requirements.

Corrective & Preventative Action

7. Can current maintenance records for fire doors be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record current inspections
• Fire doors in Class 5, 6, 9a and 9c buildings must be inspected at 6 monthly intervals.
◦ A Class 5 building is defined as an office; Class 6 buildings include shops, hotels, service stations; Class 9a buildings are health care buildings and Class 9c are aged care buildings.
• Fire doors in all other buildings must be inspected annually.

Corrective & Preventative Action

8. Are the fire/ smoke walls free from unprotected penetration?

• The owner/occupier must ensure that fire/smoke walls are free from unprotected penetration.
◦ If, for example, tradespersons or other persons have to penetrate fire or smoke walls to fit equipment, air
conditioning ducts etc. or run cabling, the person as well as the occupier must ensure these penetrations are
filled with the appropriate fire rated compound, or in the case of smoke walls, sealed. • Building plans should indicate whether walls are fire or smoke walls.
This item relates to Section 13 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Evacuation Signs/ Diagrams- General

9. Do the evacuation signs/ diagrams contain the required information?

• Every building must have evacuation signs/diagrams (except Class 1a and Class 10 buildings).
• An evacuation sign comprises evacuation procedures and an evacuation diagram.
• An evacuation procedure outlines the process to follow in the event of a fire or hazardous
materials emergency.
• Whereas evacuation diagrams must show the following details (fire safety reference points):
◦ The place that corresponds to the place in the building where the diagram is displayed (e.g. ‘You are here’ signage).
◦ The route from (you are here) to the nearest exit.
◦ Each exit of the building.
◦ Any intercommunication devices in the common areas (e.g. Warden Intercommunication Points).
◦ The locations of manually operated fire alarms (e.g. break glass alarms).
◦ The location of any fire fighting equipment in the building e.g. fire extinguishers and hose reels.
◦ The designated assembly area outside the building.
◦ The route from each exit to the assembly area.
This item relates to Sections 18, 29 and 30 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

10. Are the evacuation signs/ diagrams securely fastened and oriented for the building?

Evacuation signs/diagrams must be displayed in a conspicuous position, securely attached to a wall or the internal side of a door and orientated in line with the building layout. Sticky tape, blue tac or velcro is not securely fastened, however screws or sufficient double sided tape providing sufficient strength is acceptable.
• Evacuation signs/diagrams must be appropriately located on each evacuation route of the building.
• ‘Orientated’ means the diagram must be understandable to a person reading the sign and the instructions must
be accurate and correspond to the building layout.
• Class 2 buildings with direct exits to a road or open space that do not have common areas (i.e. corridors,
stairways or hallways) must have the evacuation signs/diagrams displayed in line with the requirements for accommodation units. (This includes owner/occupied units and residencies with long term tenancies or registered tenancy agreements). For more information regarding accommodation units refer to item 11.
• Some Class 2 and Class 3 buildings may require both types of signs.
• See Item 58 for explanation on instruction to residents and visitors to the building.
This item relates to Sections 18, 29 and 30 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Evacuation Signs- Accomodation Units

11. NA

Are accommodation unit evacuation signs securely fastened and orientated for the building?
• Accommodation unit evacuation signs must be displayed in accommodation units. (Residential units, other than those mentioned in item 10, that are owner occupied or have a tenancy agreement/lease in place and registered with the Residential Tenancy Authority are exempt from this requirement).
• Types of accommodation units required to have these evacuation signs include:
◦ An apartment used by holiday makers
◦ A serviced apartment
◦ A room in a guest house, hotel, motel.
• Some Class 2 and Class 3 buildings will be required to have both accommodation and general evacuation signs.
• These signs must be securely attached to a wall in a conspicuous position or on the inside of the front door and orientated to the building. The sign must be securely attached without compromising the integrity of any fire
doors or walls. ‘Orientated’ means the diagram must be understandable to a person reading the sign and the instructions must be accurate and correspond to the building layout.
This item relates to Sections 47 and 48 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

12. NA

Do the evacuation signs contain the required information for the accommodation units?
• Accommodation unit evacuation signs in accommodation units must show the following information:
◦ Each evacuation route from the unit to a place of safety outside the building.
◦ The location of fire fighting equipment such as fire extinguishers and fire hose reels in the vicinity of the unit.
◦ The location of manually operated fire alarms (break glass alarms).
◦ The procedure for evacuating the building.
This item relates to Sections 47and 48 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Occupancy Limits for Buildings

Obligations for All Buildings

13. Have steps been taken to ensure the building is not overcrowded?

The occupier of a building must ensure that the number of persons in the building at any one time does not exceed the maximum number that may be accommodated under the Building Code of Australia, Clause D1.6 and Clause D1.13.
◦ Exempt from the latter of these requirements are budget accommodation buildings and buildings used for residential services which must ensure that occupancy numbers do not exceed the maximums set out by Building Act 1975 in conjunction with the Queensland Development Code, MP 2.1 and the Queensland Development Code, Mandatory Part 5.7, respectively.
Clause D1.6 of the Building Code of Australia outlines the required dimensions of exits and paths of travel to exits while Clause D1.13 outlines the method of calculating the number of persons which can be accommodated in a storey, room or mezzanine with consideration of the purpose for which it is used and layout of the floor area.
• Clause D1.13 of the Building Code of Australia refers to the amount of space a person requires in different types of buildings.
• A building certifier may give advice on the number of persons allowed by these Clauses.
• A copy of the Building Code of Australia can be obtained at: www.abcb.gov.au

This item relates to Sections 14, 15 and16 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Obligations for At-Risk licences Buildings

14. NA

If an Occupancy Notice Has been issued by the Commissioner, is the building compliant?

Occupancy Notices are issued by the Commissioner of the QFES to occupiers of buildings which have a liquor licence and may be deemed at risk of overcrowding.
• If an Occupancy Notice has been issued the occupier must conspicuously display a sign stating the occupancy number above each public entrance and ensure each staff member is aware of the occupancy number.
• The occupier must ensure the occupancy number is not exceeded.
• A counting system must be implemented in ‘At-Risk’ licensed buildings:
◦ Where the occupancy number ranges from 200 to 999 people, a manual counting system or an automatic counting system is required.
◦ Where the occupancy number exceeds 999 people an automatic counting system is required.
• The occupancy number must be included in the building’s fire and evacuation plan.
• The occupier must notify the Commissioner of QFES if there are changes to the building that may increase the risk
of overcrowding.
• A Fire Safety Adviser must be appointed within one month of an Occupancy Notice being issued.

This item relates to Sections 104KK, 104KL, 104KM, 104KN, 104KO, 104KP of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990 and Section 34 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations

Prescribed Fire Safety Installations are installations that were required to be maintained in the building in question by or under any Act, including as a perquisite to the granting of any approval or the issue of any notice, certificate or instrument (Section 104D 3(a) of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990).
Maintenance of prescribed fire safety installations is required to be conducted by an appropriately qualified person which is someone who holds a licence stated in the Queensland Building Services Authority Regulation 2003, schedule 2A; or stated in the Plumbing and Drainage Regulation 2003, schedule 2, items 4 to 6; or stated in the Plumbing and Drainage Regulation 2003, schedule 3, items 4 and 5.
• This means the person actually conducting the maintenance must have an individual licence for each class or type of fire safety installation they work on.
NOTE: - The requirements for maintenance are now contained in the Queensland Development Code MP6.1 at www.hpw.qld.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/FireSafetyInstallationsInBuildings.pdf and in the associated Guidelines at www.hpw.qld.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/qdc-mp-6-1-guideline.pdf.

Exit Signs/ Emergency Lighting

15. Are the exit signs/ emergency lighting undamaged?

• The owner/occupier must ensure that exit sign covers are in place and unbroken.
• Globes for exit signs and emergency lighting must also be in place and undamaged.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

16. Can current maintenance records for exit signs and emergency lighting be produced upon request?

-A log book is required to record six monthly inspections.
-A licensed electrician or appropriately qualified person is required to conduct the maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Fire Extinguishers

17. Are all fire extinguishers correctly maintained?

• The occupier must ensure maintenance of prescribed fire extinguishers are carried out in accordance with relevant Australian Standards and by an appropriately qualified person.
• Prescribed fire extinguishers are those required to be installed in the building.
An appropriately qualified person is defined in Schedule 3 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008 (refer to the
item above for further details regarding an appropriately qualified person).
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to
online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

18. Can current maintenance records for fire extinguishers be produced upon request?

• The maintenance tag and either an invoice or maintenance report are acceptable as a record of maintenance.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct six monthly service inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to
online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes

Corrective & Preventative Action

Fire Hose Reels

19. Are all fire hose reels correctly maintained?

• The occupier must ensure maintenance of prescribed fire hose reels is carried out in accordance with relevant Australian Standards and by an appropriately qualified person.
• Prescribed fire hose reels are those required to be installed in the building.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

20. Can current maintenance records for fire hose reels be produced upon request?
• The maintenance tag and either an invoice or maintenance report are acceptable as a record of maintenance.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct six monthly service inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to
online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Fire Detection and Alarm System

21. Is the Fire Detection and Alarm System operating with no isolations or faults indicating?
• The occupier must ensure no devices or zones are isolated or showing a fault unless work is being carried out in those areas and a plan to reinstate the device or zone is in place.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

22. Can current maintenance records for Fire Detection and Alarm Systems be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record monthly inspections.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct the maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

23. If the Fire Detection and Alarm System is not connected to QFES are MCPs signed ‘Ring 000’?

• If the Fire Alarm System is only a local system and not connected to QFES monitoring, the Manual Call Points (break glass alarms) should be signed “In case of fire break glass and ring 000” to ensure persons activating these devices are aware that it will raise the alarm in the building but it will not alert the fire service.

Corrective & Preventative Action

24. Is the number of unwanted alarms activations below the prescribed average?

• The occupier must ensure that the number of unwanted alarms signalled from a monitored system in any financial year does not exceed four or the prescribed average (whichever is the greater) as published in the Queensland Government Gazette.
This item relates to Section 104DA of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990. Further details can be found at: www.fire.qld.gov.au/buildingsafety/unwanted/default.asp.

Corrective & Preventative Action

25. If a Class 2 accommodation building, are smoke alarms installed in the sole occupancy units?

• All accommodation buildings built since 1 July 1997 are required to install, as a minimum, hard-wired battery back-up smoke alarms. QFES recommend Photo-Electric smoke alarms over Ionisation type alarms.
• The owner must ensure that each sole occupancy unit within a Class 2 building built prior to 1 July 1997 has, as a minimum; a nine volt battery operated smoke alarm installed.
• The smoke alarm must comply with Australian Standard 3786 and be located as specified in the Building Code of Australia specification E2.2a Clause 3 (c) (i).
• Smoke alarms must be tested in compliance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
• This item also applies to Class 1A dwellings.
This item relates to Section 104RB of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990. Full details of tenant and owner responsibilities can be found at: www.fire.qld.gov.au/communitysafety/smokealarms/ default.asp.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Evacuation System (including warning, control and inter communication systems)

26. Is the Evacuation System in ‘auto’ mode with no zones isolated or in fault?

• The occupier must ensure that the evacuation system is in the ‘Auto’ mode and that no zones on the evacuation panel are isolated or showing a fault.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

27. Can current maintenance records for Evacuation System be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record monthly inspections.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct the maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Sprinkler System

28. Is the Sprinkler Booster Installation undamaged?

• The occupier must ensure the cabinet and internal components are undamaged and hand wheels are fitted to inlets and outlets.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources provided under the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

29. Can current maintenance records for the Sprinkler System be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record maintenance inspections.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

On-site Hydrant System

30. Is the on-site Fire Hydrant Booster Installation undamaged?

• The occupier must ensure the cabinet and internal components are undamaged and hand wheels are fitted to inlets and outlets.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

31. Are the on-site Fire Hydrants undamaged?

• The occupier must ensure on-site fire hydrants are undamaged i.e. not bent or creased and hand wheels are fitted.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

32. Can current maintenance records for the on-site Hydrant System be produced upon request?

• A log book and tag is required to record current six monthly inspections.
• All maintenance including the 5 yearly hydrostatic test is to be recorded on a ‘Form 70- fire hydrant and sprinkler
system commissioning and periodic test’.
• Form 70 can be downloaded from the Department of Housing and Public Works web page at www.hpw.qld.
gov.au/construction/BuildingPlumbing/Building/BuildingLawsCodes/QueenslandDevelopmentCode/Pages/
QueenslandDevelopmentCodeCurrentParts.aspx
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to
online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Hydrant/ Sprinkler Pumpsets

33. Are the Hydrant/Sprinkler Pumpsets correctly maintained?

• The occupier must ensure pumpsets are maintained by an appropriately qualified person.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to
online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

34. Can current maintenance records for Pumpsets be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record monthly inspections.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Stairwell Presurisation

35. Can current maintenance records for Stairwell Pressurisation be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record three monthly inspections.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Smoke and Heat Ventilation System

36. Can current maintenance records for Smoke & Heat Ventilation systems be produced upon request?

• A log book is required to record six monthly inspections.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Standby Power Supply

37. Can current maintenance records for Standby Power be produced upon request?

• Where installed, maintenance must be carried out in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes

Corrective & Preventative Action

Emergency Lift- Fire Service Control

38. Can current maintenance records for Emergency Lifts be produced upon request?

• Where installed, maintenance must be carried out in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations, but in no case at intervals of more than one year.
• Regular maintenance of the installation shall be performed as often as necessary to ensure safe and proper operation.
• An appropriately qualified person is required to conduct maintenance inspections.
See the Queensland Development Code MP 6.1 for further details regarding maintenance requirements. Links to
online resources are provided in the ‘Maintenance of Fire Safety Installations’ section of these Advisory Notes.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Critical Defects

39. If a Critical Defect Notice has been received, has action been taken to rectify within one month?

• If, following a maintenance inspection, an appropriately qualified person has deemed the fire safety installation to be defective and the defect will make the installation inoperable or have an adverse impact on the safety of occupants (i.e. a critical defect), the appropriately qualified person is obligated to notify the occupier within 24 hours of the critical defect occurring by issuing the occupier with a Critical Defect Notice in the approved form.
• The Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008 requires the critical defect to be rectified within one month of notification.
• The Critical Defect Notice issued by the appropriately qualified person should detail the corrective action required.
• The occupier should be able to show evidence of taking/initiating this corrective action.
• It may be necessary to put in place interim measures for the protection of occupants. (See item 58)
• A list of Fire Safety Installations can be found in Schedule 2 of the Building Act 1975: www.legislation.qld.gov.au/
LEGISLTN/CURRENT/B/BuildA75.pdf.
• A copy of the approved Critical Defect Notice with corresponding Explanatory Notes can be found at the following
link: www.fire.qld.gov.au/buildingsafety/pdf/QFES_CriticalDefectNotice.doc. This item relates to Sections 49 and 53 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

40. If a Critical Defect Notice has been received, have interim measures been put in place?

• In certain cases interim measures may be required to be put in place by the occupier for the safety of occupants in the building as the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990 Section 104D requires the occupier to maintain prescribed fire safety installations to a standard of safety and reliability at all times.
• For example, if the fire detection or alarm system has a critical defect and the building is used for accommodation purposes, interim measures, such as battery operated smoke alarms, may have to be installed.
This item relates to Sections 49 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Miscellaneous

Housekeeping

41. Is housekeeping acceptable?

• The owner/occupier must ensure there are no excessive flammable materials under buildings or stairways.
• It must be ensured that there are no tripping hazards such as lifting tiles and power cords in evacuation routes.
This item relates to Section 69 of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Evacuation Planning, Instruction & Pactivice

Evacuation Plans

42. Is there a fire and evacuation plan in place for each building?

• Every building must have a written fire and evacuation plan in place (except Class 1a and Class 10 buildings).
• This may be a hard copy or in electronic format.
• See item 44 to understand the items required in the fire and evacuation plan.
This item relates to Section 21 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

43. Is there a managing entity and secondary occupiers’ fire and evacuation plan for multi-occupancy buildings?

• A multi-occupancy building is a building where there is more than one tenant, for example a high-rise building or a shopping centre.
• A managing entity is, for example, a Body Corporate or Centre Manager.
• Secondary occupiers are occupiers of part of a multi-occupancy building, other than the managing entity.
• The managing entity is responsible for evacuating people from the common areas of a multi-occupancy building,
to a designated assembly area on the fire and evacuation plan. A common area is a passageway, foyer, stairway,
corridor or mall.
• Secondary occupiers are responsible for evacuating people from their tenancy. For example a retailer in a
shopping centre will evacuate shoppers to the mall area, and then the managing entity’s plan will evacuate them
out of the building to the designated assembly area.
• Both parties are responsible for ensuring their plans complement the other.
• See item 44 to understand the items required in the fire and evacuation plan.
This item relates to Sections 22 and 23 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

44. Are all the fire and evacuation plans kept in the specified form?

• The fire and evacuation plan must incorporate all the requirements of the Building Fire Safety
Regulation 2008. The plan must be in written form. This can be either as a hard copy or in electronic format as long as it is available on request in the building and is safe in the event of fire (see item 62).
• It must include:
◦ The evacuation diagram/sign of the building (as mentioned in Item 9)
◦ Name and address of the building
◦ Name, address, telephone number and electronic contact details of the owner and occupier of the building.
◦ The evacuation coordination procedures for the building.
◦ An Evacuation Coordinator is required for all buildings. This person is responsible for the evacuation
procedure. (In a building with an Emergency Control Organisation this role would normally be assumed by the
Chief Warden and Floor Wardens. For details regarding the Evacuation Coordinator refer to item 53).
◦ Instructions for evacuating the building in line with the evacuation coordination procedures.
◦ The method of operation of fire fighting equipment and manual fire alarms in the building.
◦ The procedures for giving fire and evacuation instructions to persons working in the building and ensuring the
instructions are given.
◦ Name and contact details of the person in charge of evacuating the building (the Evacuation Coordinator).
◦ The date the person became the Evacuation Coordinator.
◦ The name and contact details of persons responsible for carrying out the evacuation procedures.
◦ The date each person became responsible for carrying out the procedures.
◦ The names and contact details for persons responsible for giving the fire and evacuation instructions.
◦ Name of the person who developed, changed and reviewed the fire and evacuation plan.
• In instances where a number of persons fill a position across rotational shifts, QFES will accept a position title rather than person’s name. For example – ‘Nurse in Charge of Acute Care’ may be listed as the Evacuation Coordinator or the responsible person for the Intensive Care area.
• If the building is a high occupancy building (requires a Fire Safety Adviser – as detailed in Item 57) the fire and evacuation plan must incorporate additional requirements:
◦ The name of the Fire Safety Adviser
◦ Contact details for the Fire Safety Adviser (e.g. Phone number and electronic contact details).
◦ A description of the qualification/s held by the Fire Safety Adviser
◦ The Registered Training Organisation that issued the qualification.
◦ The date the qualification was issued.
This item relates to Section 21 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

45. Do fire and evacuation plans reflect alternative building solutions?

• An alternative solution is that which has been assessed and agreed between parties such as fire engineers, QFES and building certifiers. It allows for an alternative building solution to be put in place meeting the performance, rather than the prescriptive, requirements of the Building Code of Australia.
• If there is an alternative solution for the building, the alternative solution is to be included in the fire and evacuation plan. For example if a building has extended travel distances, the fire and evacuation plan must reference this.
This item relates to Section 24 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

46. Is there a procedure in place to evacuate persons with special needs?
• If persons with special needs are in the building the occupier is responsible for ensuring there is a procedure in place to evacuate them safely.
• A person with special needs can be:
◦ A person with a disability
◦ A child
◦ A person affected by medication or alcohol
◦ A person in lawful custody
◦ A person working in the building where access is restricted (e.g. a basement, false ceiling cavity).
◦ A person working in a hazardous area of a building.
• An example of a procedure to evacuate persons with special needs may be to identify one or more persons who,
on activation of the alarm, are to proceed to the area where the persons with special needs are and assist them in
evacuation.
• A record of this procedure must be retained with the fire and evacuation plan and other documents required to be
kept.
This item relates to Section 19 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

47. Are all fire and evacuation plans available upon request?

• All fire and evacuation plans must be made available for inspection, free of charge, upon request during normal business hours. This includes electronic copies.
This item relates to Section 26 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

48. Are all fire and evacuation plans current and reviewed annually?
• All fire and evacuation plans must be reviewed annually.
◦ An example of reviewing the plan may be to walk through the building with the plan to ensure that the
evacuation routes have not changed and checking that the same persons remain in the roles listed on the fire
and evacuation plan.
• The review process must be recorded, and kept with other relevant documents.
• If changes are made to the building which affects the fire and evacuation plan, the plan must be altered to reflect
the changes as soon as practical but no later than one month after the change occurred.
◦ Examples of this include refurbishment or a change in the use of the building or a person becoming or
ceasing to be the evacuation coordinator.
This item relates to Sections 27 and 28 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Fire and Evacuation Instruction

49. Have general evacuation instructions been given?

• The occupier of the building must give general evacuation instructions to workers within two days of commencing work and then annually.
• These instructions include the location of fire safety reference points and the procedures for evacuating the building safely in the event of a fire or hazardous materials emergency. (Fire safety reference points are those detailed in item 9).
• There is no qualification required to provide these instructions.
This item relates to Sections 32 and 35 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

50. Are records for general evacuation instructions kept and available upon request?

• A record of general evacuation instructions must be kept. This can be in electronic form. (See item 62)
• Details on the instruction records must include:
◦ The name of each person receiving the instruction.
◦ The name of the person who gave the instruction.
◦ The date instructions were given.
◦ A description of the instructions.
◦ These records must be retained with other documents required to be kept. This item relates to Section 45 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

51. Have first-response evacuation instructions been given?

• The occupier of the building must give first-response evacuation instructions to workers within one month of commencing work and then every two years.
• First-response evacuation instructions are instructions concerning the operation of manually operated fire alarms and fire fighting equipment in the building. These instructions can be given by practical hands on training or instruction via a CD, DVD or Internet etc.
• If a Fire Safety Adviser is required for the building, the Fire Safety Adviser or a Registered Training Organisation must give or arrange for the training or instructions to be given (A Fire Safety Adviser is required in high occupancy buildings as defined in item 57 of these Advisory Notes).
• There is no qualification required to provide these instructions.
Note: For buildings used for temporary events (3 months or less), First-Response and General Evacuation Instructions must be given to persons before they start working in the building. Evacuation coordination instructions must also be given to persons responsible for carrying out the evacuation.
This item relates to Sections 36 and 37 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

52. Are records for first-response evacuation instructions kept and available upon request?

• A record of first-response evacuation instructions must be retained. This can be in electronic form. (See item 62)
• Details on the instruction records must include:
◦ The name of each person receiving the instruction.
◦ The name of the person who gave the instruction.
◦ The date instructions were given.
◦ A description of the instructions.
This item relates to Section 45 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

53. Have evacuation coordination instructions been given?

• The occupier of a building must appoint an Evacuation Coordinator (this person is responsible for the coordination of the building’s evacuation in the event of a fire or other emergency).
◦ In a Class 2 or Class 3 buildings that have no employees or workers within the building the body corporate or managing entity must appoint an evacuation coordinator for the building.
◦ A person who resides in the building may volunteer to fulfil this role however there is no requirement for them to reside in or be onsite in the building.
• The occupier of a building must give evacuation coordination instructions to the Evacuation Coordinator and other persons responsible for carrying out the evacuation coordination procedures every year and within one month of any changes to the procedures or personnel.
◦ If a new occupant starts to occupy a building, the new occupant must, within two months, give evacuation coordination instructions to the evacuation coordinator.
• Evacuation coordination procedures include:
◦ Means of alerting and communicating with persons in the building (e.g. public address messages).
◦ Alerting the fire service, by phone or manually operated fire alarms.
◦ Arranging the evacuation of all persons in the building including those with special needs.
◦ Checking whether all persons have been evacuated.
◦ Method of alerting the evacuation coordinator as to the result of the evacuation.
◦ Meeting the fire service on arrival at a suitable place as stated on the evacuation plan.
This item relates to Sections 17, 38, 39 and 40 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

54. Are records for evacuation coordination instructions kept and available upon request?

• A record of evacuation coordination instructions must be retained. This can be in electronic form. (See item 62)
• Details on the instruction records must include:
The name of each person receiving the instruction.
◦ The name of the person who gave the instruction.
◦ The date instructions were given.
◦ A description of the instructions.
This item relates to Section 45 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

55. Has evacuation practice been conducted annually?

• All occupiers are required to conduct an evacuation of a building annually. The practice evacuation must be carried out by an appropriate number of people.
• It may not be feasible to evacuate, for this exercise, a person with a disability, however the process for evacuation of persons with special needs must be included in the fire and evacuation plan.
• Select numbers of staff such as receptionists may be excluded to answer telephone calls. This item relates to Sections 43 and 44 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

56. Are evacuation practice records kept and available upon request?

• A record of practice evacuations must be retained with the evacuation plan and can be in electronic form.
• Details required on the evacuation practice record include:
◦ The date of the evacuation.
◦ The times the evacuation started and ended.
◦ Any action taken or required as a result of the evacuation, such as a review of the evacuation instructions.
This item relates to Section 46 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

57. Has a Fire Safety Adviser been appointed?

• Any building that is a workplace employing 30 or more people as defined under the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008 the occupier must appoint a Fire Safety Adviser (FSA).
• Accommodation buildings (Class 2 and 3) over 25 metres in effective height and some licensed building regardless of the number of workers must also appoint an FSA.
• Effective height is defined by the Building Code of Australia (BCA).
• Workplace examples include:
◦ A building or part of a building where individual employers employ 30 or more workers at the workplace.
◦ QFES recommend that in multiple tenanted buildings a FSA be appointed for the whole building in consultation with tenants and the managing entity if there are common areas, such as malls common passageways or stairs even if the managing entity does not employ 30 or more workers in the building.
◦ Individual tenants may wish to appoint their own FSA or utilise the FSA appointed by the managing entity, if there is one, and they agree to do so. Either is acceptable to the QFES.
• The FSA must hold a current building fire safety qualification as an FSA (have completed a course in the 8 competencies required within the previous three years).
• Additional information is available at: www.fire.qld.gov.au/buildingsafety/pdf/QFES-BFS-InfoSheet-FSA.pdf This item relates to section 34 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

58. Is there a procedure in place to provide ‘adequate instruction’ to prescribed persons?

• Section 104E of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990 requires that the occupier of a building must provide adequate instructions to prescribed persons in the building concerning the action to be taken by them in the event of fire threatening the building in order to ensure the safety of themselves and others persons.
• The Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008 states that at any given time a person is a prescribed person if ,during the past three months, there have been at least two weeks in which the person worked, resided or visited the building for a total period in each week of at least 10 hours.
• Persons working in the building for less than the prescribed time must receive general evacuation instruction.
• Adequate instruction for persons working in the building are detailed in items 49, 51 and 53.
• Adequate instruction for residents and persons visiting the building may be provided by ensuring references that
assist these people in evacuating the building are included in the fire and evacuation plan and that evacuation signs/diagrams are displayed in accordance with item 9 of these Advisory Notes.
This item relates to Section 31 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008 and Section 104E of the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Record Keeping

Approval Documents

59. Are approval documents obtained and kept?

• The owner/occupier is required to take reasonable steps to acquire relevant approval documents.
• Relevant approval documents consist of the following:-
◦ For buildings built under the Deemed to Satisfy Provisions of the Building Code of Australia (BCA) from 1 July 1997 onwards, the following:-
– ‘Certificate of Classification’, and
– A list of fire safety installations within the building.
◦ For buildings built with Alternate Solutions from 1 July 1997 onwards, the following:-
– ‘Certificate of Classification’,
– A list of fire safety installations within the building,
– The Fire Safety Management Procedures (Management in Use Documentation), and
– Fire Engineering Report
◦ For buildings built prior to 1 July 1997, the following:-
– ‘Certificate of Classification’, ‘Certificate of Approval’ or other approval documents (if either of these are
not available QFES will accept written documentation showing requests for copies of relevant approval
documents from the relevant local government or building certifier), and
– A list of fire safety installations within the building.
◦ For Crown owned buildings the following:-
– A list of fire safety installations within the building, and
– The Fire Safety Management Procedures (Management in Use Documentation) if the building was built
using an alternate building solution.
• A copy of these approval documents must be retained with other documents required to be kept.
• A ‘Certificate of Classification’ is the document issued by a Local Government or Certifier which determines the
building classification.
• The ‘Certificate of Classification’ can be obtained from the local Council. If a search is conducted and no
Certificate is available the written evidence of this must be retained with the approval documents.
• Buildings owned by the Crown, including Commonwealth, State and Local Government, are not required to have
or display a ‘Certificate of Classification’.
• A list of Fire Safety Installations can be obtained from Schedule 2 of the Building Act 1975: www.legislation.qld.
gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/B/BuildA75.pdf
This item relates to Section 25 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

60. Is the ‘Certificate of Classification’ for the building displayed?

• This item only applies to buildings approved after 1 July 1997.
• The Building Act 1975 - Section 108A requires buildings, apart from Class 1a buildings (a Class 1a building is a
normal domestic family home) which were built on or after 1 July 1997, to display a ‘Certificate of Classification’.
• It is the building owner’s responsibility to obtain the ‘Certificate of Classification’ from the building certifier.
• The ‘Certificate of Classification’ must be displayed conspicuously, as near as practical to the main entrance.
• An authorised fire officer may require the owner to produce the ‘Certificate of Classification’ if not displayed. (An
authorised fire officer is defined in the Fire and Rescue Service Act 1990 as a fire officer).
• Buildings owned by the Crown, including Commonwealth, State and Local Government, are not required to have
or display a ‘Certificate of Classification’.
This item relates to Section 108A of the Building Act 1975.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Occupier's Statement (Annual)

61. Can an annual occupier statement be produced upon request?

• An occupier statement for the maintenance of all fire safety installations must be kept and a copy sent each year to the Commissioner. The occupier statement can be emailed to: occupier. statements@qfes.qld.gov.au
• A copy must be retained with the evacuation plan and can be kept electronically.
• An example of the occupier statement is contained in the Queensland Development Code
Mandatory Part 6.1. It is acceptable to utilise a modified form (e.g. company logo/heading etc.) as long as all of the relevant information is contained.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Record Security

62. Are records kept in a way that is reasonably safe from the effects of fire?
• A copy of plans and documents, including prescribed documents must be kept in the building and reasonably safe from the effects of fire. A metal filing cabinet will satisfy these requirements.
• In Class 2 or Class 3 buildings or buildings with no common areas it is permissible for required documents to be located in lockable metal storage boxes affixed to a wall that allows access for inspection as required. This is not a requirement but a solution to the requirement to have the records onsite in the building.
• A prescribed document is defined by the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008 as meaning any of the following for the building –
◦ A record of a review of a fire and evacuation plan;
◦ A fire and evacuation instruction record;
◦ An evacuation practice record;
◦ A record of maintenance.
• The occupier must keep fire safety records and prescribed documents for at least 2 years, including records created prior to the introduction of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.
• Documents must be produced upon request of a authorised fire officer.
• Records required to be kept by the regulation (other than logbooks required by an Australian Standard for the
maintenance of fire safety installations) may be kept electronically as long as they are available for inspection as required by the regulation. (See item 65 for Fire Safety Management Plans)
This item relates to Sections 71, 72 and 86 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

63. Is a copy of all prescribed documents kept in another place?

• In addition to keeping the record mentioned above in item 62, a copy of all records must be kept in another place. These copies may be electronic.
• Copies of maintenance records can be retained by the fire contractor. Other records are to be kept by the occupier. This item relates to Section 71 of the Building Fire Safety Regulation 2008.

Corrective & Preventative Action

Sign Off
On site representative
Auditor's signature
Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.