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Safety Talk

List fall hazards on site

List fall hazards on site

Hazard

Details

Explain dangers

Falls are the number-one cause of accidental deaths in construction. And you don’t have to fall far to be killed or injured.

Have you explained the dangers?

Identify controls

On many sites, guardrails are the most common and convenient means of fall protection. Where guardrails cannot be installed or are impractical, the two basic types of fall protection are travel restraint and fall arrest. Both involve a full-body harness.

Are guardrails installed?

Travel restraint system

A travel restraint system keeps you from getting too close to an unprotected edge.

The lifeline and lanyard are adjusted to let you travel only so far. When you get to the open edge of a floor or roof, the system holds you back and prevents you from falling.

A full-body harness should be used with travel restraint systems. You can attach the harness with a lanyard that attaches to a rope grab on the lifeline. The lifeline must be securely anchored.

Is a travel restraint system in use?

Fall arrest system

If no other fall protection is in place, you must use a fall arrest system if you are in danger of falling:
• more than 3 metres
• into operating machinery
• into water or another liquid
• into or onto a hazardous substance or object.

A fall arrest system consists of a full-body harness, a lanyard, and a shock absorber.

You can connect the lanyard directly to adequate support OR to a rope grab mounted on an adequately anchored lifeline.

A full-body harness must also be worn and tied off when you are:
• on a rolling scaffold that is being moved
• getting on, working from, or getting off a suspended platform, suspended scaffold, or bosun’s chair.

Lifelines must be adequately anchored. For fall arrest, that means able to support the weight of a small car (about 3,600 pounds).

Is a fall arrest system in use?

Demonstrate

Full_body_harness.png

Show how to put on, adjust, and wear a full-body harness.

Attendees

In attendance

Attendee
Add signature

Safety Talk: Fall Protection - Basic Types Checklist

Created by: SafetyCulture Staff | Industry: Construction | Downloads: 312

This safety talk topic is part of the Fall Protection (Working at heights) series. Created by the Infrastructure Health & Safety Association (ISHA). A safety talk is a hands-on way to remind workers that health and safety are important on the job. Each talk takes about five minutes and can help workers recognize and control hazards on the project.

Signup for a free iAuditor account to download and edit this checklist. It will be added to your free account and you will be able to conduct inspections from your mobile device.

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Safety Talk

List fall hazards on site

List fall hazards on site

Hazard

Details

Explain dangers

Falls are the number-one cause of accidental deaths in construction. And you don’t have to fall far to be killed or injured.

Have you explained the dangers?

Identify controls

On many sites, guardrails are the most common and convenient means of fall protection. Where guardrails cannot be installed or are impractical, the two basic types of fall protection are travel restraint and fall arrest. Both involve a full-body harness.

Are guardrails installed?

Travel restraint system

A travel restraint system keeps you from getting too close to an unprotected edge.

The lifeline and lanyard are adjusted to let you travel only so far. When you get to the open edge of a floor or roof, the system holds you back and prevents you from falling.

A full-body harness should be used with travel restraint systems. You can attach the harness with a lanyard that attaches to a rope grab on the lifeline. The lifeline must be securely anchored.

Is a travel restraint system in use?

Fall arrest system

If no other fall protection is in place, you must use a fall arrest system if you are in danger of falling:
• more than 3 metres
• into operating machinery
• into water or another liquid
• into or onto a hazardous substance or object.

A fall arrest system consists of a full-body harness, a lanyard, and a shock absorber.

You can connect the lanyard directly to adequate support OR to a rope grab mounted on an adequately anchored lifeline.

A full-body harness must also be worn and tied off when you are:
• on a rolling scaffold that is being moved
• getting on, working from, or getting off a suspended platform, suspended scaffold, or bosun’s chair.

Lifelines must be adequately anchored. For fall arrest, that means able to support the weight of a small car (about 3,600 pounds).

Is a fall arrest system in use?

Demonstrate

Full_body_harness.png

Show how to put on, adjust, and wear a full-body harness.

Attendees

In attendance

Attendee
Add signature