FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT REPORT

  • ENTER SITE PHOTO

  • Contents

  • BUILDING INFORMATION AND LAYOUT
    INTRODUCTION
    THE 9 STEP PROCESS TO FIRE SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT
    WHO AND HOW MANY MIGHT BE HARMED
    FIRE LOSS EXPERIENCE
    ENFORCEMENT NOTICES
    RISK RATING AND COMMENTS
    OVERVIEW OF THE FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT
    THE REGULATORY REFORM (FIRE SAFETY) ORDER 2005
    FIRE SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS
    CAVEATS / LIMITATIONS
    FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT
    SECTION 1: MEANS OF ESCAPE
    SECTION 2: DETECTION AND WARNING
    SECTION 3: EMERGENCY LIGHTING
    SECTION 4: FIRE FIGHTING EQUIPMENT
    SECTION 5: FIRE SAFETY SIGNAGE
    SECTION 6: ELECTRICAL & GAS SAFETY
    SECTION 7: HAZARDS
    SECTION 8: PROCEDURES & ARRANGEMENTS
    SECTION 9: TRAINING
    SECTION 10: FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT ACTION PLAN
    SUPPORTING MEDIA

COMPANY / LOCATION:

  • LOCATION(S) & USAGE OF AREAS COVERED BY ASSESSMENT:

  • ANY AREAS NOT ACCESSED? (E.g. Ceiling voids or Locked areas)

BUILDING INFORMATION & LAYOUT:

  • Enter number of floors (Detail any mezzanine floors)

  • Approximate Floor Area:

  • Brief Details of Construction, Compartmentation, and Location etc.:

  • Details of neighbours / other activities undertaken at the site:

INTRODUCTION

  • This Fire Risk Assessment has been conducted by the Group SHEQ Manager for Walkers Transport at the request of Walkers Transport Ltd to assist in the undertaking of their duties under fire safety legislation, specifically in carrying out a fire safety risk assessment in accordance with their duties under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005

  • Following the additional recommended control measures identified in this risk assessment will enable the risks in the event of a fire to be minimised. It will also aid compliance with the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 and further details included may assist in your Risk Assessment requirements under The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 and The Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974

LIST OF REFERENCE MATERIAL:

  • Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005

  • Building Regulations 2000 (2006 edition) Approved Document B

  • BS 5839 Part 1 – Fire Detection and Fire Alarm Systems for Buildings

  • BS 5266 Part 1 – Emergency Lighting

  • BS 5306-3:2017 – Fire extinguishing installations and equipment on premises

  • BS 9999 – Code of practice for fire safety in the design, management and use of buildings

  • The Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999

  • Site fire log book

THE 9 STEP PROCESS TO FIRE SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT

  • The fire risk assessment has been carried out following the PAS 79 Fire Risk Assessment Standards. The approach behind PAS 79 is a system of evaluation covering many factors which decide fire hazard, ranging from any likelihood of there being a fire to the actual consequences of one occurring

  • PAS 79 outlines nine distinct steps for carrying out a thorough fire risk assessment:

  • Step 1 - Obtaining information and data about the building, including the processes carried out in the structure as well as people either present or likely to be

  • Step 2 - Identification of both fire hazards but also means for their control or elimination

  • Step 3 - Assessment of the likelihood of any fire

  • Step 4 - Determination of any fire protection measures present

  • Step 5 - Obtaining related information regarding fire safety management

  • Step 6 - An assessment of the most likely repercussions to individuals if a fire happens

  • Step 7 - Assessment of overall fire risk

  • Step 8 - Formulation and documentation of an action plan

  • Step 9 - A defined date by which a fire risk assessment needs to be reviewed

WHO AND HOW MANY PEOPLE MIGHT BE HARMED?

  • Approximate maximum number of people on site:

  • Approximate maximum number of employees at any one time:

  • Potential number of Visitors / Guests / Contractors (People unfamiliar with the layout of the building):

  • Number of Cleaning Staff:

  • Number of Security Staff:

  • Maximum number of members of the public:

Occupants at Increased Risk:

  • Sleeping Occupants

  • Details of any Sleeping occupants

  • People with disabilities (Limited mobility, hearing or visually impaired / sensorial impaired):

  • Details of people with disabilities

  • Children / Young People:

  • Details of Children / Young People

  • Occupants in remote areas:

  • Details of Occupants in remote areas

  • Other site tenants / neighbours / building occupants (includes members of the public):

FIRE LOSS EXPERIENCE

  • Are there are any known records of fire losses?

  • Details of any historic fire losses:

ENFORCEMENT NOTICES

  • Have any enforcement notices been issued?

  • Details of enforcement notices

RISK RATING AND COMMENTS (See Risk Rating table below)

  • What is the risk level of the site at the time of the inspection?

  • Who is in control of the premises?

  • A suitable risk-based control plan should involve effort and urgency that is proportional to risk. The following risk-based control plan is based on one advocated by BS 8800 for general health and safety risks

  • Overall standards were found to be good with only a small number of minor improvements which can be made with regard to fire safety management for it to meet with current fire safety standards

  • The following simple risk level estimator is based on a more general health and safety risk level estimator contained in BS8800:

    Fire Risk Matrix.png

OVERVIEW OF THE FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT

  • Overview of the Fire Risk Assessment (see attached PDF)

FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT: Hazards, Elimination & Control

  • SECTION 1: MEANS OF ESCAPE

  • 1.1 Are there a sufficient number of exits of suitable width for the people likely to be present? (Is there an adequate number of exits of suitable width?)

  • 1.2 When the premises are occupied can all final exit doors be easily and immediately opened (using one hand), without use of a key?

  • 1.3 Where lockable doors are found on the escape route, are these fitted with ‘thumb- turn’ style mechanisms on the internal aspects to prevent people from becoming locked in?

  • 1.4 Do the doors on escape routes open in the direction of travel (i.e. towards the escape route)?

  • 1.5 Are fire door features (intumescent strips, cold smoke seals, glazing panels, hinges etc.) in good condition and free from gaps >3mm?

  • 1.6 Do all self-closing fire doors close fully on to the rebate of the door frame?

  • 1.7 Are all self-closing devices in good working order?

  • 1.8 Are all self-closing fire doors closed and not wedged in the open position?

  • 1.9 Where possible, is the use of sliding or revolving doors as fire exits avoided?

  • 1.10 Do the exits lead to a place of safety / designated assembly point?

  • 1.11 Are distances of travel between fire doors / final exits reasonable?

  • 1.12 Are internal escape routes suitably protected?

  • 1.13 Is a good housekeeping regime in place which ensures all passageways and corridors are free from obstruction and in a state of good repair?

  • 1.14 Are external escape routes suitable (access to designated assembly point, access for emergency vehicles, gritting provisions for surface treatment in inclement weather etc.)

  • 1.15 Are in-house checks conducted for fire doors, fire exits, and escape routes (internal & external) and findings formally recorded?

  • 1.16 Have measures been taken to ensure that smoke and flames cannot spread from one compartment within the building to another?

  • 1.17 Is there a lack of breaks/holes in walls, floors or ceilings which could help speed the spread of fire?

  • 1.18 Are any smoke extraction/or ventilation systems installed?

  • 1.19 Are evacuation aids provided for people who may require assistance in the event of an emergency?

  • 1.20 Are any disabled refuges provided?

  • 1.21 Is a means of communication provided at the refuge point?

  • 1.22 Where lifts are installed, are the shafts fire protected?

  • 1.23 Where installed, do lifts default to ground floor upon fire alarm activation?

  • 1.24 Are any cladding external wall systems (EWS) installed, and have these been tested for flammability?

  • 1.25 Are balconies in place and have these been tested for flammability?

  • 1.26 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 2: DETECTION AND WARNING

  • DETECTION AND WARNING INFORMATION (see attached PDF)

  • Please state the Fire Alarm / Detection system category

  • 2.1 Is there an effective means of fire detection provided?

  • 2.2 Is there an effective means of giving warning provided (sounders / flashing beacons etc.)?

  • 2.3 Can the means of warning be clearly heard and understood by everyone throughout the whole building when initiated from a single point?

  • 2.4 Are break glass call points clearly visible and unobstructed?

  • 2.5 Is the fire alarm system connected to a monitoring centre which calls the fire brigade?

  • 2.6 Is the fire panel (and any repeater panel) clearly visible and free from faults and/or disablements?

  • 2.7 Is the fire alarm system subject to service and inspection on a 6-monthly basis by a competent contractor (in accordance with BS 5839-1: 2017)?

  • 2.8 Are in-house checks for the fire alarm conducted on a weekly basis (using alternate call points) and findings formally recorded? (Audible and visual alarms should be tested on a weekly basis.)

  • 2.9 Are false alarms recorded and investigated?

  • 2.10 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 3: EMERGENCY LIGHTING

  • 3.1 Are the premises occupied during the hours of darkness?

  • 3.2 Are the premises provided with an emergency lighting system to provide illumination of escape routes (internal and external) in the event of a failure of the general lighting system?

  • 3.3 Is the emergency lighting serviced and inspected (including full discharge / drain- down) on an annual basis by a competent contractor (in accordance with BS 5266-1:2016)?

  • 3.4 Are in-house checks and ‘flick’ tests conducted on a monthly basis for emergency lighting and the findings formally recorded?

  • 3.5 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 4: FIRE FIGHTING EQUIPMENT

  • 4.1 Is appropriate and sufficient firefighting equipment provided suitable to the likely cause and nature of fire?

  • 4.2 Fire Extinguishers Are they wall or stand mounted?

  • Fire Extinguishers should be placed on a dedicated stand or hung on a wall at a convenient height so they can be easily lifted off (at about 1m for larger extinguishers, 1.5m for smaller ones, to the level of the handle). Ideally no one should have to travel more than 30m to reach a fire extinguisher

  • 4.3 Are they freely available, visible and unobstructed?

  • 4.4 Are fire extinguishers subject to service and testing on an annual basis by a competent contractor (in accordance with BS 5306-3: 2017)?

  • 4.5 Are in-house check conducted for fire extinguishers on a monthly basis and findings formally logged? (Checks to include: position/location of extinguisher, accessibility/obstructions, evidence of discharged/damaged/lost pressure (if fitted with a pressure indicator) and that operating instructions are clean, legible and face outwards).

  • 4.6 Are fire hoses, sprinklers or gas suppression systems installed?

  • 4.7 Are dry/wet risers installed?

  • 4.8 Are any sprinklers, gas suppressions and/or riser systems installed – tested and maintained at the prescribed intervals?

  • Guidance on the maintenance of all Sprinkler systems is given in the Loss Prevention Council (LPC) Rules, BS EN 1284522 or BS 5306- 260 and should only be carried out by a competent person. Routine maintenance will be required and should be confirmed with the landlord prior to occupancy

  • 4.9 If sprinklers are fitted, is there adequate clearance between the sprinkler heads and materials (such as racking etc.)?

  • 4.10 Is the location of the nearest fire hydrant point known?

  • 4.11 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 5: FIRE SAFETY SIGNAGE

  • 5.1 Are fire exit signs displayed at strategical points throughout the premises?

  • 5.2 Does signage include use of pictograms

  • 5.3 Is signage of an adequate size and appropriate material and sufficiently illuminated?

  • 5.4 Is a clear zonal plan displayed alongside the fire alarm control panel?

  • 5.5 Are all internal fire doors signed ‘Fire Door – Keep Shut’, on both sides of the Door?

  • 5.6 Is ‘Automatic Fire Door – Keep Clear’ signage displayed on fire doors fitted with automatic closing devices?

  • 5.7 Are final exit points labelled ‘Fire Door – Keep Clear’ on the external aspect?

  • 5.8 Are ‘Push Bar To Open’ signs or similar affixed to doors with emergency fastenings?

  • 5.9 Are ‘Fire Action’ notices displayed and details completed where required?

  • 5.10 Is appropriate signage displayed for all items of firefighting equipment?

  • 5.11 Are ‘Do Not Use Lift In Event of Fire’ signs or similar displayed at each lift call point?

  • 5.12 Is COSHH signage displayed at relevant storage areas?

  • 5.13 Is any further fire safety signage, not mentioned above, deemed necessary?

  • 5.14 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE

SECTION 6: ELECTRICAL & GAS SAFETY

  • 6.1 Has the mains electrical systems been inspected to IET Wiring Standards?

  • It should be ascertained as to when the mains electrical installation was last subjected to periodic inspection and test by a competent person to current IET wiring standards. A certificate of test should be obtained to verify the integrity of the system. Any highlighted recommendations should be actioned

  • 6.2 Are electrical distribution boards adequately enclosed?

  • 6.3 Is portable electrical appliance testing carried out on a regular basis?

  • 6.4 Are all cables and plugs in good condition (i.e. not damaged or worn) and plug sockets / extension leads not over loaded?

  • 6.5 Is a suitable policy in place regarding the use of personal electrical items?

  • 6.6 Is all gas fired plant subjected to regular servicing by a Gas Safe registered organisation?

  • 6.7 Are Carbon Monoxide detectors provided and tested on a regular basis?

  • 6.8 Where oil-fired installations are provided are these subject to service and inspection by a competent contractor?

  • 6.9 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 7: HAZARDS

  • 7.1 Is the area free from rubbish and combustible waste materials?

  • 7.2 Is the upholstery of furniture in good condition and fire retardant (current standards / regulations (BS 7176 or the Furniture and Furnishings (Fire) (Safety) Regulations 1988)?

  • 7.3 Are the locations of mains shut off points for power supplies, gas, oil and water etc., known and clearly identified?

  • 7.4 Has consideration been given to all cost- effective measures that could be taken to prevent the occurrence of arson (such as security provisions, proximity of fire loading to the building etc) ?

  • 7.5 Where there are processes which could cause a high risk of fire breaking out (such as welding or cooking etc.) are these adequately controlled?

  • 7.6 Are procedures needed for shutting down machines, supplies or processes etc.?

  • 7.7 Are all combustible materials and flammable liquids and gases stored safely and isolated from ignition sources?

  • 7.8 Is there a system for controlling the amounts of combustible materials and flammable liquids and gases that are kept at the site?

  • 7.9 Are hazardous materials stored appropriately (i.e. fire retardant cabinet, non-compatible items stored separately)?

  • 7.10 Are gas cylinders stored in an appropriate caged area (ideally externally, full separate from empty, protected from accidental damage and heat sources etc.)?

  • 7.11 Where air conditioning / air handling units are installed are these subject to regular maintenance by a competent person?

  • 7.12 Are filters ducting and extraction subject to inspection thorough cleaning by a competent person in accordance with expected level of use?

  • 7.13 Where tumble dryers / air dryers are used is there a formal schedule for ‘lint’ removal?

  • 7.14 Does the building have a lightning protection and is this serviced and maintained by a competent person?

  • 7.15 Is there a designated external smoking area provided with adequate extinguishing facilities which are emptied on a regular basis?

  • 7.16 Is smoking prohibited in the building and ‘no smoking’ signage displayed at all entrances?

  • 7.17 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 8: PROCEDURES & ARRANGEMENTS

  • 8.1 Have recommendations given by other bodies (such as insurance companies and the fire service) been implemented?

  • 8.2 Has an emergency plan been drawn up in case of a major fire or emergency and is it displayed?

  • 8.3 Has a fire policy been developed and communicated?

  • 8.4 Are visitors entering the premises made aware of emergency procedures?

  • 8.5 Are PEEPs conducted where required (incl. offer to visitors / contractors on arrival to site)?

  • 8.6 If you are a multi-occupancy building, have you informed other occupants and the landlord of the significant findings you have identified, likewise have you had information from other tenants and the landlord given to you?

  • 8.7 Are contractors controlled if they are carrying out repairs, alterations or maintenance (such as PTW for Hot Works / Permit to Breach fire etc.)?

  • 8.8 ANY COMMENTS ON THE EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES IN PLACE?

SECTION 9: TRAINING

  • 9.1 Are all employees given instruction on the action to take in the event of fire (incl. inductions and basic fire safety awareness training)?

  • 9.2 Are Fire Wardens appointed and trained?

  • 9.3 Is ‘refresher training’ provided at suitable intervals?

  • 9.4 Is additional training provided for safe use and selection of firefighting equipment?

  • 9.5 Is additional training provided for safe use of evacuation aids?

  • 9.6 Is a full planned evacuation fire drill carried out at least once a year?

  • This appendix is intended to provide a quick reference checklist to assist with the management of the fire safety issues raised in the report. The action plan should not be completed without reference to the relevant section of the fire risk assessment report

  • Matters identified as requiring remedial action have been categorised as:

  • 1 – HIGH: Contravention of statutory requirement, which could lead to prosecution or a Prohibition Notice by the Enforcing Authority, or a fire safety risk which has a high probability of occurrence. These matters should receive immediate action to either achieve compliance with statutory requirements or to reduce the fire safety risk. ACTION IMMEDIATELY

  • 2 – MEDIUM: Contravention of statutory requirements, which could lead to an Improvement Notice being issued by the Enforcing Authority due to non-compliance with statutory regulations or approved codes of practice (AcoP), or a fire safety risk which is deemed likely to occur and could result in injury or loss. ACTION WITHIN 3 MONTHS

  • 3 – LOW: Fire safety action point which is considered to be important in regard to good fire safety practice, but is not necessarily subject to statutory legislation, or it may be a fire safety risk which is deemed unlikely but may involve negligible injury. ACTION WITHIN 6 MONTHS

  • Notes:

  • It is essential that all hazards and deficiencies identified in this report should be addressed by implementing all the recommendations made in the following section. Failing to complete the information will leave the company vulnerable to prosecution by the enforcing authorities, and may invalidate some building insurance policies

  • SECTION 10: ACTION PLAN
  • SEE FAILED ACTIONS SUMMARY AT THE FRONT OF THIS REPORT

  • TARGET DATE FOR COMPLETING "FAILED ITEMS" CORRECTIVE ACTIONS

  • CORRECTIVE ACTION TAKEN BY

  • DATE COMPLETED

Supporting Media

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