Audit

Doors

3. Fire doors are kept closed and unobstructed?

Cylinders

Cylinders are stored in this room?

4. All gas cylinders are properly capped or regulated?

Compressed and liquefied gases are maintained under extremely high pressures inside cylinders. The rapid release of a gas from these cylinders could turn them into projectiles and force breathable air from a room. Thus, compressed gas cylinders and tank valves must be protected from physical damage by means of protective caps, collars, or similar devices at all times, except when empty, being processed, or connected for use. (Reference: NFPA 55-7.1.5.1; NFPA 55-7.1.5.2)

5. All gas cylinders are properly secured or fastened in an upright position?

Compressed gas containers, cylinders, and tanks in use or in storage must be secured to prevent them from falling or being knocked over by corralling them and securing them to a cart, framework, or fixed object by use of a restraint. Cylinders must be stored in an upright position unless designed otherwise. (Reference: NFPA 55-7.1.4.4)

6. Particularly Hazardous Gases are used in approved fume hood or gas cabinet?

Particularly Hazardous Gases (PHG), such as arsine, butadiene, chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, and phosgene, are chemicals that require special handling procedures. Any gas that is considered acutely toxic or pyrophoric is considered a PHG and must be used in an approved chemical fume hood or gas cabinet. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan, NFPA 45 11.1.4.1)

7. Gas cylinders are transported on appropriate carts with straps/chains?

Compressed gas cylinders must be secured during transportation to prevent them from falling or being knocked over by securing them to a cart, framework, or fixed object by use of a restraint. (Reference: NFPA 55: 7.1.4.4)

8. Flammable gas cylinders are not stored next to oxidizing gases?

Flammable gases must be stored at least 6.1 meters (20 feet) from oxidizing gases. (Reference: NFPA 55-7.1.6.2)

9. Cylinders stored are in-use?

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) regulations restrict storage of cylinders in laboratories to those that are in-use and a single replacement for each cylinder in-use. (References: NFPA 45 11.1.6.4)

Refrigerators

10. Flammable liquids are not stored in household refrigerators?

The use of domestic refrigerators for the storage of flammable liquids presents a significant hazard in the laboratory work area. In addition to vapor accumulation, a domestic refrigerator contains readily available ignition sources, such as thermostats, light switches, and heater strips, all within or exposed to the refrigerated storage compartment. Furthermore, the compressor and its circuits are typically located at the bottom of the unit, where vapors from flammable liquid spills or leaks could easily accumulate. Flammable liquids must be refrigerated in units designed for flammable materials; typically these units are “Flammable storage” or “Explosion-proof” refrigerators. (Reference: NFPA 45 - Annex A)

11. Food and beverages are not stored in the refrigerator?

Food and beverages are prohibited in UNH laboratories. If food or beverages are being used for research purposes, they must be labeled, “For Experimental Use Only” or “Not for Human Consumption.” Food and beverages must never be stored in any laboratory refrigerator in which chemicals, biological and radioactive materials are kept. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

12. Is freezer frost build-up properly managed?

Frost can engulf chemical containers, making it impossible to access them. This can lead to hazardous situations when defrosting or chipping out frost months or years later. Defrost the freezer before chemicals are entombed.

Electrical Safety

13. Equipment is properly grounded?

Electrical devices and equipment should be properly grounded to prevent electrocution. Never remove the grounding pin to make a three-prong cord fit in a two-prong outlet. Never use an electrical cord that is missing its grounding pin. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

14. Room occupants test GFCI devices monthly?

The GFCI receptacles in this room should be tested at least once per month. Room occupants are responsible for testing the GFCI. Test the receptacle by plugging a light into the receptacle. Push the Test button and the light should go out. Push the Reset button and the light should go back on. If the light fails to turn off, or fails to turn back on, contact the Facilities Support Center at 862-1437 to replace the receptacle. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

15. Electrical devices used near water utilize GFCI protection?

Electrical devices used near water sources should be used with ground fault protection. Please use a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) pigtail in cases where a GFCI is not incorporated into the circuit or outlet in use. GFCI pigtails are available at hardware stores or through UNH Central Stores.

16. Extension cords are not run through doors, windows, walls, ceilings?

Electrical cords and power strips cannot be linked together for the sole purpose of extending the electrical source to an appliance. Temporary electrical power cords are not permitted where permanent wiring can be installed. Additionally, extension cords may not be run through doors, windows, walls, or ceilings and may not be attached to building surfaces (i.e. walls, ceilings) by staples or other means. Please contact the Facilities Support Center at 862-1437 to request that permanent wiring be installed. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.334; NFPA 70B Article 20.5; NFPA 70 Article 240.5; NFPA 1-11.1.6.4)

17. All electrical cords are in good condition, without defect?

Electrical cords must be protected from damage and inspected regularly for wear, as it is especially likely around the plug. Worn or frayed cords must be removed from service and replaced. Electrical cords may not be repaired with electrical tape. Please contact the University Instrumentation Center at 862-2790 to request the cord is replaced by a qualified electrician. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

18. Electrical cords do not present a tripping hazard?

Electrical cords may not be placed in such a manner that they create a tripping hazard. Cords may be taped in place or covered with rubber strips to eliminate the tripping hazard. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

General Building Safety

19. Aisles, corridors and exits are free of obstruction and tripping hazards?

Aisles, corridors, and exits must remain free of obstructions to maintain a safe work environment and easy means of egress. Means of egress must be continuously maintained free of all obstructions or impediments to full instant use in the case of fire or other emergency. The width of the aisle must be no less than 36 inches (Reference: NFPA 101-7.1.10.1; International Fire Code, Section 315.2.2)

20. The ceiling is intact (i.e., ceiling tiles in place, etc.)?

There were missing ceiling tiles in this room. Penetrations in the ceiling may allow for the easy spread of heat and smoke in a fire. Replacing these broken or missing ceiling tiles will help prevent the spread of heat, smoke and fire during an emergency. Contact the Facilities Support Center at 862-1437 to request that the ceiling be repaired. (Reference: NFPA 101 - 8.4, NFPA 101- A.8.4.2(2))

21. Penetrations in firewalls are sealed with appropriate firestop material?

Penetrations for cables, cable trays, conduits, pipes, tubes, combustion vents and exhaust vents, wires, and similar items to accommodate electrical, mechanical, plumbing, and communications systems that pass through a wall, floor, or floor/ceiling assembly constructed as a fire barrier must be protected by a firestop system or device. Open penetrations are prohibited as they may allow for the easy spread of heat and smoke in a fire. (Reference: NFPA 1-12.7.5.1; NFPA 1-12.8.4; NFPA 25-4.1.2.1)

Emergency Equipment

22. A drench shower is unobstructed (at least 32 inches in diameter)?

There must be unimpeded access to the deluge shower and it must be easily accessible to room occupants. Please clear the immediate area around the deluge shower for easy access in case of an emergency. At least thirty-two inches in diameter beneath the shower must be kept free of obstructions (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.151(c), ANSI Z358.1)

23. All persons in the room are aware of the location of the drench shower?

All room occupants should be aware of the location of emergency equipment. Drench showers and other emergency wash systems are used in an emergency to flush chemicals that have accidentally come in contact with laboratory personnel. In order to wash the body properly, clothing should be removed as water is applied. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

24. A fire extinguisher is available in the room?

Emergency equipment, including fire extinguisher, must be easily accessible in this room. Please contact the Facilities Support Center at 862-1437 to install a fire extinguisher in this room. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.157; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

25. All fire extinguishers have been inspected?

All fire extinguishers are subject to maintenance at intervals of not more than 1 year, at the time of hydrostatic test, or when specifically indicated by an inspection or electronic notification. Please contact the Facilities Support Center at 862-1437 to request inspection of the fire extinguisher(s).(Reference: NFPA 10-7.3.1.1.1)

26. All fire extinguishers/pull stations are unobstructed?

Fire extinguisher or pull station must must be accessible, unobstructed, and visible.(Reference: NFPA 10-6.1.3.3.1; NFPA 101-9.6.2.6)

27. An eyewash station is easily accessible?

There must be unimpeded access to the eyewash and it must be easily accessible to room occupants. Please clear the immediate area around the eyewash for easy access in case of an emergency. At least six inches around the eyewash must be kept free of obstructions (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.151(c), ANSI Z358.1)

28. Bottled eyewash solution, if present, is not expired?

Replace botteled eyewash solution with one that is not expired.

29. The eyewash station is flushed weekly?

Reminder to occupants to flush the emergency eyewash in this location weekly. Regular flushing of eyewashes removes stagnant water from the pipes and helps ensure proper eyewash operation. (Reference: ANSI Z358.1; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

30. A first-aid kit is available in the room?

A first aid kit could not be located in this room. Each room that has hazardous chemicals, infectious agents, or radiological materials, must have a first aid kit. The kit should be labeled, “First Aid Kit” and should be easily accessible to room occupants. (Reference: 29 CFR 1901.151; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

31. Occupants know the location of the first aid kit?

Occupants are unaware of the location of a first-aid kit. All room occupants should be aware of the location of emergency equipment.

32. The kit contains clean, sterile bandages, pads, bandaids, tape?

"The first aid kit in this room does not contain recommended safety equipment. Each room that has hazardous chemicals, infectious agents, or radiological materials, must have a first aid kit. According to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard Z308.1, the kit should contain the following items; ; most commercially available first aid kits contain these items:

• 1 - Absorbent compress, 32 square inches (No side smaller than 4”)
• 16 - Adhesive bandages, 1” x 3”
• 1 - Adhesive tape, 5 yards
• 10 - Antiseptic, 0.5 gram application
• 1 - Ice packs
• 2 pair - Medical exam gloves (disposable)
• 4 - Sterile pads, 3” x 3”
• 1 - Triangular bandage, 40” x 40” x 56”

33. Hydrofluoric acid first aid treatment is available if HF is used or stored in this room.

Hydrofluoric acid is stored in this room. Please ensure all locations that use or store hydrofluoric acid have 2.5% calcium gluconate gel on hand in case of accidental skin contact. This can be purchased from chemical suppliers or the Chemistry Stockroom. Please ensure all lab staff are aware of emergency procedures for HF. Additional information is available from OEHS.

34. A chemical spill kit is available and contains: absorbent, safety glasses, reusable gloves, cleanup materials.

A chemical spill kit could not be located in this room. Since the room contains hazardous materials, a chemical spill kit must be available. Spill kits are available from the Chemistry Department Stockroom in Parsons Hall, laboratory supply companies, or can be individually assembled. The spill kit container should be non-breakable, and should contain: absorbent, safety glasses, tongs, and gloves. The kit should be labeled, “Chemical Spill Kit” and should be easily accessible to laboratory personnel. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

Personal Protective Equipment

35. PPE is easily accessible and worn when appropriate.

Proper personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves, safety glasses, laboratory coats) should be worn when working with hazardous chemicals or biohazardous agents. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.1450; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

Lab coats

Goggles

Safety glasses

Face shield

Disposable gloves

Utility gloves

Hearing protection

Respirators

36. Occupants do not wear open-toe shoes, sandals, flip-flops, clogs, etc.

Open-toe shoes, sandals, flip-flops, or clogs, etc., is prohibited in campus laboratories. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan; 29 CFR 1910.1450)

37. Occupants wear gowns/lab coats when large areas of skin are exposed (i.e. when lab occupants wear shorts, skirts, etc.).

Shorts, skirts, tank tops, and other articles of clothing that expose large areas of skin are prohibited in campus laboratories unless a laboratory gown is worn over these clothes. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan; 29 CFR 1910.1450)

38. All occupants wear appropriate gloves?

Proper personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves, safety glasses, laboratory coats) should be worn when working with hazardous chemicals or biohazardous agents. Safety equipment should be readily available for visitors entering the room. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.1450; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

39. All occupants wear the appropriate eye/face protection?

Proper personal protective equipment should be worn when working with hazardous chemicals or biohazardous agents. Safety equipment should be readily available for visitors entering the room. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.1450; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

40. Chemical splash goggles are used when appropriate?

Proper personal protective equipment should be worn when working with hazardous chemicals or biohazardous agents. Safety equipment should be readily available for visitors entering the room. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.1450; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

41. Respirators are used appropriately?

The use of air-purifying respirators for routine laboratory work is generally not required or recommended. Respirators may be necessary in limited cases where airborne exposures to hazardous substances cannot be adequately controlled with routine engineering controls (e.g., fume hoods, biosafety cabinets). Improper use of a respirator is itself a hazard. Please contact the Office of Environmental Health and Safety at 862-4041 to determine if respirators are required in your laboratory. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.134; UNH Respiratory Protection Program)

Work Practices

42. Staff does not eat, drink, store food, apply make-up (including lip balm), insert contact lenses, etc., in the room.

Food and beverages are prohibited in UNH rooms where hazardous chemicals are used or stored. Food and beverages must never be stored in any room in which chemicals, biological and radioactive materials are kept. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Program)

43. Mechanical pipetting devices are in use; mouth pipetting does not occur.

Mouth pipetting is prohibited. Mechanical pipetting aids should be used. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Program)

44. Hands are washed at the end of experiments and gloves are removed prior to leaving the room.

Wash hands after contacting hazardous substances and before eating, drinking, or smoking. Wearing gloves outside the lab should be minimized, except to move hazardous materials between rooms. Instead, transport chemicals from place to place on a cart, in a clean secondary container, or in a bottle carrier with secure handles. Gloves should never come in contact with door handles, elevator buttons, telephones, lavatory faucets, vending machines, bottled-water dispensers, ice-making machines, or other surfaces outside the laboratory. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Program)

45. Workstations, closets, etc. are clean, neat and orderly?

Clean and orderly work areas are essential to providing a safe work environment for faculty, staff, students and visitors. In an effort to maintain a clean work area, please keep bench tops, fume hoods, floors, etc. as clean as possible. Please ensure that work areas are wiped down with an appropriate cleaner or disinfectant at the end of the day and after spills.

46. Hypodermic needles are re-sheathed appropriately?

To avoid needle-stick injuries when re-sheathing needles, please employ the one-hand rule: place the sheath on the desk or in some device to secure them, then guide the needle into it without holding the sheath. Once the needle is safely covered, secure the sheath.

Chemical Safety

47. Occupants know how/where to access MSDS/SDSs?

Room occupants do not know how to access Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). The purpose of a MSDS is to provide safety data about a specific hazardous substance. The MSDS contains physical data and other information specified by OSHA. A manufacturer or importer must generate an MSDS for each hazardous substance covered by the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard. It is common practice for a manufacturer or importer to provide an MSDS that is reproduced on paper. UNH has developed the UNH CEMS website to allow users the ability to access MSDS online: http://www.cems.sr.unh.edu/CEMS/SearchMSDS#searchform. (Reference: UNH Hazard Communication Program)

48. Incompatible chemicals segregated (i.e. no water reactives under the sink, etc.).

Incompatible chemicals must be appropriately segregated. Appropriate segregation can include storing materials together on a shelf, separated by secondary containment. Guidelines for proper chemical storage can be found on the Office of Environmental Health and Safety’s website at http://unh.edu/research/sites/unh.edu.research/files/images/Chemical%20Safety%204%20-%20MIT-Chemical-Storage-Guidelines.pdf.

49. Flammable liquids are stored in approved safety cans, flammable storage cabinets or flammable storage refrigerators?

Flammable liquids must be stored in appropriate safety cans, flammable storage cabinets or flammable storage refrigerators. Storage of flammable liquids outside approved flammable storage cabinets and safety cans must not exceed 10 gallons per 100 square feet of laboratory space, including waste. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

50. Ether and other highly flammable liquids are stored away from sources of heat, direct sunlight and ignition?

Highly flammable liquids must be stored away from sources of heat, direct sunlight, and ignition sources. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

51. All chemicals have been registered through CEMS (http://www.cems.sr.unh.edu)?

Chemicals in this room are not included in the UNH CEMS chemical inventory. The OSHA Hazard Communication Standard requires UNH to maintain an inventory of hazardous chemicals. A hazardous chemical is defined as any liquid, solid or gas that could present a physical or health hazard to an employee. Lab occupants must ensure that orders for new chemicals are delivered to the Chemical Transfer Station and all existing chemicals in the lab are listed in the CEMS inventory. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

52. All chemical containers are capped and sealed except when actively adding or removing materials?

Chemical containers must have a cap in place at all times, except when actively filling or discharging the bottle or can. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

53. Chemicals are not placed or stored on the floor?

Chemicals should not be stored on the floor or in fume hoods. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

54. All chemicals and containers are properly labeled?

OSHA and the New Hampshire Department of Labor require that all containers with > 1% of hazardous material be labeled with the proper chemical name and the chemical’s associated hazards. Chemical formulas and acronyms are not acceptable. It is recommended that the user's name also appear on the label. Labels on incoming containers must not be removed or defaced. Dating is especially important in the case of compounds which have a specified shelf life, such as those that will form peroxides (e.g. ethyl ether). (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.1200)

55. Preserved specimens are labeled with constituents?

Containers with preserved specimens in this room are not labeled to identify the preservative solution. Preserved specimens should be labeled to indicate the preservative or fixative they are stored in. This can be accomplished by labeling individual containers, entire shelves, boxes, or other outer containers, as long as it is clear what the solution is. Containers of hazardous materials, regardless if their purpose is primary or secondary, must be labeled to identify the contents. The full chemical name must be used; acronyms and short forms are not acceptable.

56. Controlled substances are stored in a secure location?

Controlled substances must be stored in a secure location. Please refer to controlled substance regulations as prescribed by your DEA license for appropriate storage and recordkeeping requirements.

57. Strong oxidizers are segregated from contact with combustibles?

Strong oxidizers should not be stored in direct contact with wood or wood products. Please segregate strong oxidizers from direct contact with wood with glass, plastic, or ceramic secondary containment.

58. Toxic/corrosive liquids stored below eye level?

Toxic or corrosive liquids should not be stored above eye-level. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

59. Lead solder is used appropriately in this room?

Steps should be taken to prevent exposure to lead as well as flux and flux flumes. Any waste solder should be collected for disposal as hazardous waste. Please review this soldering safety summary from SUNY Stonybrook, feel free to contact me for more information: http://naples.cc.stonybrook.edu/Admin/HRSForms.nsf/pub/EHSD0348/$File/EHSD0348.pdf. Please contact Marty McCrone at 862-3526 or Jeff Anderson at 862-0683 for information on disposal of lead and lead contaminated materials.

Hazardous Waste

60. Each hazardous waste container has a completed EHS hazardous waste label including proper identification of contents?

Waste containers must be labeled to ensure that required information concerning the contents and hazards of the container are documented and communicated. Each label must be marked with the words "Hazardous Waste" and words that identify the contents of the container; symbols, abbreviations, acronyms, and formulas are not adequate. The use of UNH Hazardous waste label is required. (Reference: UNH Hazardous Waste Management Plan)

61. Chemical waste containers are in secondary containment?

Hazardous waste must be stored in secondary containment. Secondary containment can be acquired from Environmental Health and Safety upon request; please call 862-4041. (Reference: UNH Hazardous Waste Management Plan)

62. All chemical waste containers are capped when not in use?

A hazardous waste container in the laboratory is not capped. According to New Hampshire's Hazardous Waste Rule 507.01(a)(3), chemical waste containers must be closed and secured when not in use. (Reference: UNH Hazardous Waste Management Plan)

63. Hazardous waste is stored in appropriate containers?

Liquid hazardous waste solutions were stored in wide-mouth glass containers which are designed for solid material. Liquid waste should only be stored in leak-proof containers designed for liquid material. Please transfer these liquids to containers designed for liquids.

64. Spent fluorescent lamps are properly managed?

All spent fluorescent lamps including energy savings lamps and mercury vapor lamps, must be accumulated and stored in a box that is kept closed at all times unless immediately adding lamps. The box must be marked with the words “Waste Lamps.” Failure to mark the box or keep boxes closed will result in a fine from the State of NH or US Environmental Protection Agency. Contact the Facilities Support Center at 862-1437 to request a pickup of spent fluorescent lamps.

65. Pipettes and other sharps are properly disposed?

Pipette tips and other sharps (e.g. hypodermic needles, scalpel blades) waste must not be disposed as regular trash. Accumulate tips and other sharps in a puncture resistant container. Tips that are not contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious agents can be disposed in regular trash as long as they are in a sealed, puncture resistant container such as a metal can, cardboard box, or plastic container. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

66. If chemical waste is generated, all generators have taken the online Hazardous Waste Training?

Laboratory personnel have not taken the Hazardous Waste Training. Laboratory personnel generating or handling hazardous waste are required to take the online Hazardous Waste Training, available on Blackboard at http://blackboard.unh.edu. All waste handlers at UNH are required to take this training so they understand how to safely manage hazardous waste. Upon request, classroom instruction will be provided. Personnel must successfully complete the training program within six months after the date of their employment or assignment to a facility, or to a new position at a facility, whichever is later. Employees who have not received this training must not work in unsupervised positions until they have completed the training requirements of this section. (Reference: UNH Hazardous Waste Management Plan)

Fume Hoods and Exhaust Systems

67. The fume hood is closed when unattended?

Unattended hoods should always have sashes closed. (Reference: UNH Fume Hood Program)

68. Workers look through fume hood sashes, not under them?

Reminder to occupants to perform work at the fume hood while looking through the sash. For hoods with horizontal sliding sashes, there is a tendency to slide the sash over and work with no barrier in front of you. This seriously limits the physical protection offered by the sash and also compromises protection from hazardous vapors. Sash sections should be positioned in front of your body when working at the hood; as a rule of thumb, you should always be looking through the sash when working at the hood.

69. Airflow in hood is not blocked or restricted?

The chemical fume hood in this room may not operate properly because the airflow through the hood is blocked or seriously obstructed. Large devices and equipment should be placed at the rear of the hood and raised two inches off the surface with blocks or bricks. This will allow airflow around and under the equipment. Equipment placed near the hood face will cause great variation in airflow. (Reference: UNH Fume Hood Program)

70. Occupants contact Facilities (862-1437) if they suspect a fume hood problem?

The chemical fume hood does not appear to be working properly. Please contact the Facilities Control Center at 862-1437 to report fume hood problems. (Reference: UNH Fume Hood Program)

Biosafety

There are biosafety issues in this lab.

71. Biosafety cabinet has current annual certification test.

Biosafety cabinets must have an annual certification test. (CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomendial Laboratories, Appendix A)

72. Airflow vents in the biosafety cabinet are not blocked (with supplies, equipment, etc.).

Blocking air flow vents will restrict airflow and may affect hood containment.

73. Sharps are collected in puncture resistant sharps containers, labeled with a biohazard symbol?

Sharps, such as razor blades, scalpels, syringes, needles, and broken glass, that have been contaminated with infectious material, must be placed into an impervious, puncture-resistant containers made of rigid plastic or metal (not broken glass containers). This container must be labeled with the words, “Sharps Container” and, if containing biohazardous agents, the “International Biohazard Symbol.” (Reference: CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th Edition)

74. A biological spill kit is easily accessible?

A biological spill kit could not be located in this room. Since the room contains biological agents, a biological spill kit must be available. The spill kit container should be non-breakable, and should contain: nitrile or latex gloves, disinfectant (i.e. bleach, Lysol), paper towels, tongs, and utility gloves. The kit should be labeled, “Biological Spill Kit” and should be easily accessible to laboratory personnel. (Reference: UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

75. Biological waste containers are covered when not actively adding waste?

Biohazard burn boxes must be closed prior to removal to prevent spillage or protrusion of contents during handling, storage, transport, or shipping. Please cover these containers except when actively adding waste. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.1030; UNH Laboratory Safety Plan)

76. Infectious waste containers are not used for any other purpose.

Infectious waste containers in this room are being used for regular trash. These containers should only be used to dispose of infectious waste. Infectious waste is very expensive to manage. Please make every effort to only dispose of infectious waste in the biological burn box.

77. Plants in the room are research related?

Plants or animals not associated with work being performed are not permitted in areas where infectious materials and/ or animals are housed or manipulated. (Reference: Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th ed.)

78. Aspiration traps are set up properly?

An aspiration trap inlet tube did not extend far enough into the flask to avoid material being pulled directly out into the sink. Please ensure inlet tubes on aspiration traps extend well below the side arm so material is not pulled directly into the exhaust outlet.

79. Aspiration traps contain liquid disinfectant?

Aspiration traps in this room did not contain disinfectant; aspiration traps must contain liquid disinfectant. (Reference: CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th ed.)

80. If lab windows can be opened, they have been fitted with screens.

BSL1 and BSL2 laboratory windows must have screens if they can be opened. (Reference: CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th ed.)

Other Lab Safety

81. Centrifuge door has interlocks?

A centrifuge in this room can be opened while the rotor is spinning. Equipment and devices with exposed belts, pulleys, moving parts, and other hazards must have appropriate guarding. Centrifuges in this room must be labeled “CAUTION: Do not open when rotor is spinning.” Consider replacing the centrifuge with modern equipment that has interlocks which prevent exposure to moving parts. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.212)

82. Centrifuge is clean and free of debris?

The centrifuge rotor has debris in it which may cause an unbalanced condition. Please ensure that the rotors are clean and balanced prior to use. Use of unbalanced rotors in high speed centrifuges can cause catastrophic damage and injury.

83. Grinding wheel meets safety standards?

A grinding wheel in this room does not meet OSHA standards. Refer to the OSHA grinding wheel compliance checklist at the link below. Please take careful note of requirements for tongue and work rest distances from wheel. Also, note that the device must be permanently mounted. http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/machineguarding/new-grinder-checklist.html

84. Belts, pulleys, and other exposed moving equipment parts are guarded to prevent injury?

Equipment and devices with exposed belts, pulleys, moving parts, and other hazards must have appropriate guarding. Guards must prevent accidental contact with moving parts. Please ensure that appropriate guarding is in place before using equipment or devices with moving parts. (Reference: 29 CFR 1910.212)

85. Vacuum line filter protection is in place.

To prevent fluid and aerosol contamination of the central vacuum system, it is recommended that a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cartridge filter be placed in any suction tubing immediately before the vacuum inlet valves. This filter will help protect the central vacuum system from corrosion, contamination, etc. These filters should be replaced whenever there is evidence of filter blockage, failure, wetness, and on a routine basis, no less then annually. These cartridge filters are available from scientific supply vendors (e.g. Whatman Vacu-Guard #6722-5000 or Pall Gelman Acro 50 Vent Filters #4251).

86. Chairs in lab are able to be cleaned and decontaminated?

There are cloth chairs in the room. Cloth chairs may not be used in rooms where infectious materials are present. Also, cloth chairs likely cannot be decontaminated in the event of contamination with hazardous chemicals or radiochemicals. Please consider replacing cloth chairs with lab-grade chairs which will not absorb chemical spills and can be surface decontaminated for infectious materials.

87. Other?

Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.