General

Work Health and Safety (WHS) Policy

  • To supplement the central UWA Work Health and Safety Policy it is important to have a health and safety manual which contains a statement of commitment to conform and use of systems which properly manage health and safety. Does the manual appropriately address the tasks and activities carried out in the workplace?
    Sight appropriate specific local rules in the health and safety manual.

  • Do local management arrangements address how improvements to minimise workplace injuries and illness will be achieved? Sight evidence of Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes, workplace inspection records and hazard reports which may lead to improvements.

  • Do local management arrangements demonstrate commitment to comply with current WHS legislation and requirements of UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing? Examine the health and safety manual and any other documentation for reinforcement that such commitment is demonstrated.

  • Are worker inductions structured to ensure communication of the UWA Work Health and Safety Policy? Sight induction records which demonstrate communication of health and safety policy.

  • Is there a health and safety manual which contains a statement of commitment to conform to the UWA Work Health and Safety Policy? Sight a readily available copy of the health and safety manual.

  • Is the manual up-to-date and is someone charged with this task? Confirm that a document control panel shows the manual has not expired and that someone is charged with organising reviews.

  • Can senior management explain the objectives of the main University Work Health and Safety Policy and is there clear commitment to continuous improvement in health and safety performance. From general discussion with management, are current legislative requirements understood and is it clear that health and safety is given high priority in workplace activities?

  • If the workplace engages contractors, does it ensure that they have completed the UWA contractor induction (which introduces UWA Work Health and Safety Policy)? Sight contractor ID card as evidence of induction. Also check that contractors used by the workplace are on the Campus Management; Preferred Contractors List via http://www.fm.uwa.edu.au/consultants.

  • In accordance with University policy, are senior management involved in the development, resourcing, promotion and implementation of health and safety matters in the workplace including the provision of suitable supervision and training to promote competence when undertaking tasks? This is best achieved via discussion with senior managers, Health and Safety Representatives and Safety Officers. Sighting of Health and Safety Committee minutes and any other records showing participation in related matters can provide documentary evidence.

  • Section Assessment

Planning

Planning identification of hazards, hazard/risk assessment and control of hazard/risks

  • Does the organisation use a documented WHS risk assessment process to evaluate operations, processes, products and/or services which may have significant WHS hazards / risks? Sight use of documented planning process or instructions. Ideally using the UWA Safe System of Work for Task and Activity Planning.

  • Have the key safety hazards/risks that may be encountered with workplace activities, products and/or services been identified. Sight evidence of use of the (1) UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Risk Register (2) Standard Operating Procedures (3) Past Workplace Risk Assessments.

  • Are purchases made in accordance with UWA Purchasing Safety Procedures describing the safety requirements for purchase or supply of goods? Sight evidence of purchases, particularly hazardous goods or equipment.

  • Is information on significant WHS safety hazards and risks kept up-to-date? Sight written evidence of monitoring of implemented control measures.

  • Section Assessment

Legal and other requirements

  • Is there a documented process for identifying legal and other requirements relating to WHS hazards / risks associated with the workplace? Sight written evidence that those who plan workplace activities follow a formal process to achieve this (e.g. the UWA Task and Activity Planner).

  • When planning activities, do workers make reference to the UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Risk Register for guidance on industry codes of practice, customer/client requirements, health and safety procedures and guidance? If other means are used, encourage use of UWA Safe System of Work for Task and Activity Planning. Sight local Risk Register

  • Is there written and up-to-date evidence of actively compliant systems being used in the workplace? Sight Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes, workplace inspection records, newsletters, health and safety manual.

  • Section Assessment

Objectives and targets

  • Does the workplace have a process for establishing, implementing and maintaining documented safety and health objectives and targets? Sight records of business in progress in Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes or equivalent but encourage use of committees where representation of the workplace is absent.

  • Are there currently defined WHS objectives for the workplace? Sight the defined objectives for the workplace – should be recorded in Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes.

  • Is there written evidence of actively compliant systems being used in the workplace? Sight evidence such as meeting minutes, newsletters or local instructions – can be achieved via Health and Safety Committee minutes.

  • Section Assessment

WHS management plans

  • There should be an annually revised safety plan for the workplace focussing on health and safety improvements with processes and resources in place which will enable objectives to be realised: This could be developed and overseen by local workplace management but would be better monitored by integration into the planning and monitoring carried out by an overseeing health and safety committee. Does it appropriately address the tasks and activities carried out in the workplace? Check that plans which are documented actually related to the specific workplace being audited. Related Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes should address this for the workplaces they oversee otherwise seek alternatives.

  • Have measurable targets been set for WHS improvement objectives? Sight written evidence of planning of WHS improvements and setting of objectives. Related Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes should address this for the workplaces they oversee.

  • If any factors alter in a way that may undermine the achievement of planned objectives, are alternative arrangements in place? Sight evidence of contingency planning.

  • Is there an annual safety plan for the workplace and are its objectives periodically reviewed for relevance and progress? Sight written evidence of planning, monitoring and review or related Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes.

  • Section Assessment

Implementation

Structure and responsibility

  • Within the workplace, is there an established organisational safety structure? Sight Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes or other regularly produced evidence of ongoing proactive safety management.

  • Management are required to provide adequate resources to implement and control the Occupational Health and Safety Management System:

    Are a sufficient number of safety personnel allocated for the workplace? Sight evidence of designated roles and responsibilities in the Health and Safety Manual or other published document and evaluate in relation to size of the workplace.

  • Are required technical resources available or is there funding for any required specialised training? Sight records of allocated contingency funding for training and records of completed specialised training. This will be contained in Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes or via other documented management processes.

  • Has sufficient funding been allocated to ensure continued and efficient management and control? Evidence of financial allocation in annual budget. This will be contained in Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes or via other documented management processes

  • Are sufficient funds made available to resource suitable manual handling equipment? Sight physical evidence that such resources are readily available.

  • Section Assessment

Responsibility and accountability

  • Have roles, responsibilities and accountabilities been documented and communicated for personnel charged with facilitating WHS management? Sight written evidence of H&S related posts and defined responsibilities. This should be included in the Health and Safety Manual or other published document.

  • Do roles, responsibilities and accountabilities include those relating to the use of contractors? Sight evidence that contractor activities are well managed and monitored closely (e.g. from the job planning process, sight contractor safety management plans and contractor Job Safety Analysis records or risk assessments presented by contractors during the task planning process)

  • Are personnel (including contractors) familiar with their defined WHS management responsibilities and accountabilities?
    Has senior management nominated a specific management representative with responsibility and authority for establishing, implementing and maintaining WHSMS requirements and for reporting back on the WHSMS performance? Confirm that such a post is current in the workplace.

  • Is WHSMS performance regularly reported to senior workplace management to enable review and improvements? Sight evidence in the form of monitoring and reports or via distribution of Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes.

  • Section Assessment

Training and competency

  • The workplace must be able to demonstrate that there is a process of identifying training needs, in relation to WHS management, of employees, contractors and suppliers in relation to planned activities.
    Sight evidence of training plans and completed records of training / competency over the last 12 months by several individuals?

  • a) Is the process effectively communicated to workers? Sight evidence that they are kept informed.

  • b) Do all new employees, postgraduates and others required to undertake activities in the workplace, complete a relevant safety induction? Sight induction records including both on-line induction and local induction regarding specific workplace information.

  • c) Are there individuals who fill specific WHS management roles and responsibilities including emergency response and first aid? Sight records of training or the list contained in the Emergencies, Incidents and injuries section of the Health and Safety Manual.

  • d) If appropriate, does the process highlight specific hazards for which standard training is carried as a pre-requisite for working in the area such as manual handling hazards? Sight written notice of this need and records of training / competency produced in the last 2 years

  • e) Is training carried out via an approved UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing training course or other qualified authority? Sight records of training / competency such as certificates or other information demonstrating where and how training was received.

  • f) Are staff provided with ergonomic equipment for use of computers according to UWA policies and encouraged to take appropriate breaks? Sight correct setup of workstations, seating, related ergonomic equipment and obtain staff confirmation that regular breaks are encouraged and taken.

  • g) Is there evidence that staff are made aware of the Employee Assistance Program (EAP)? Verbal confirmation that managers are aware and encourage staff to make use of EAP as appropriate.

  • Section Assessment

Consultation, communication and reporting

Consultation

  • Are there processes in place to ensure employer/employee involvement and consultation take place on WHS issues and are they readily available to interested parties? Sight evidence that workers are informed. This is best achieved via an active committee, adequate Health and Safety Representatives of the workplace and regular distribution of Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes.

  • Does the system ensure that workers:

    a) Are involved in the development and implementation of procedures to manage risk?
    Sight written evidence of collaboration between managers and workers.

  • b) Are consulted on matters which affect workplace WHS? Sight Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes or equivalent circulars.

  • c) Select staff to represent them on WHS matters? Confirm that there are an appropriate number of Health and Safety Representatives / Safety Officers to ensure proper consultation and communication in the workplace. The posts should be listed in the Health and Safety Manual.

  • d) Are informed of their Health and Safety Representative(s) and their workplace safety officers? Confirm that worker can identify their Safety and Health Representative and Safety Officer?

  • e) Are Health and safety representatives involved in regular workplace inspections? Sight workplace inspection records.

  • Section Assessment

Communication

  • Is there a workplace health and safety committee where both senior managers and Health and Safety Representatives are members? Sight written evidence of regular meetings (at least twice a year, ideally quarterly) via Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes.

  • Are there processes or procedures for communicating issues related to WHS aspects and the WHSMS? Sight evidence that they exist and that they are actively used. Distribution of Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes is ideal.

  • Are internal business communications retained when they may affect health and safety between this and other work areas? Sight written evidence of retention.

  • Section Assessment

Reporting

  • Are there processes for reporting of information to ensure that WHSMS is monitored and improved? Ideally, this will be via published Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes. Alternative means are acceptable if they meet the same standards.

  • Do these reporting processes address the following:

    a) WHS performance reporting (including WHS audits and reviews)?
    b) Reporting incidents and system failures?
    c) Reporting on hazard identifications?
    d) Reporting on risk assessment?
    e) Reporting on preventive and corrective action?
    f) Reporting on statutory requirements?

    Sight written evidence that the procedures include the entire list above. Properly prepared Health and Safety Committee annual reports will address all of the above.

  • Is there proactive identification of health and safety issues and are they addressed in a timely manner to reduce risk of injury? Sight evidence that issues are effectively managed (e.g. hazard reports, remedial work order requests). Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes should also provide the required evidence.

  • Are outcomes from workplace inspections discussed between managers/Safety Officers and Health and safety representatives? Sight Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes or other records showing Health and Safety Representative involvement.

  • Section Assessment

Documentation

  • Does the local documentation which is used in the workplace, describe the core elements of the Work Health and Safety management system and their interaction? A Health and Safety manual based on the UWA pro-forma will address these elements. Sight the documents and check they address core elements such as H&S manual, Local H&S policy, evidence of use of the UWA Task and Activity Planner.

  • Is there a formal process for storage of safety related documents including a responsible person? Confirm that this process exists.

  • Section Assessment

Document and data control

  • Are there established procedure(s) for controlling documents and data required by this Standard?

    a) Documents can be readily located?
    b) Documents are reviewed periodically and revised as necessary and approved for adequacy by competent and responsible personnel?
    c) Current versions of relevant documents and data are available at all locations to ensure the effective functioning of the Work Health and Safety Management System?
    d) Obsolete documents are removed promptly from points of use, or otherwise assured against unintended use?
    e) Archival of documents and data for legal or knowledge preservation purposes or both are suitably identified?

    Sight written evidence that the procedures include the entire list above.

  • Do local WHS documents incorporate document control information? Verify that this includes who is responsible for the creation, version or revision numbers, publication and expiry dates?

  • For current risk assessments which describe hazardous tasks, are they within their expiry date and upon expiry is there a plan to review them? Sight workplace risk assessments and verify that they are within their expiry date. Discuss of sight evidence that processes exist to review them if still required following their expiry

  • Section Assessment

Hazard identification, hazard/risk assessment and control of hazard risks

General

  • Has the WHSMS established, implemented and maintained procedures to ensure:

    a) Hazards are identified?
    b) Risks from identified hazards are assessed?
    c) Appropriate risk control measures are implemented?
    d) That the above three steps are re-evaluated for further hazards?

    This is best achieved by using the UWA Safe System of Work although alternative equivalents can be accepted pending future revisions which will move towards standard UWA practices.

  • Are there ongoing arrangements for indentifying hazards such as regular workplace inspections? Sight workplace inspection records.

  • Section Assessment

Hazard/Risk Assessment

  • Does local hazard identification processes take into consideration situations or events or combination of circumstances that could give rise to injury or illness? Seek hazard identification, risk assessments or implementation of standard industry controls. Properly prepared workplace risk assessments provide suitable evidence.

  • Are potential risks of violence or aggression reviewed proactively and is there appropriate monitoring and management? Seek management confirmation of capability in managing such occurrences including training in management of customer aggression.

  • Is the environment well designed to reduce manual handling risks? Confirm that there are aids to manual handling obviously available in the area.

  • Have any obvious hazards been effectively controlled? If obvious hazards are not controlled it is likely that other less obvious hazards are not identified.

  • Does the local hazard identification process consider:

    a) The way work is organised, managed and changes that may occur?
    b) The design of workplaces, work processes, materials, plant and equipment?
    c) The fabrication, installation, commissioning, using, handling and disposal (of materials, plant and equipment)?
    d) The purchasing of goods and services?
    e) The contracting and sub-contracting of plant, equipment and services and labour including contract specification and responsibilities to and by contractors?
    f) The inspection, maintenance, testing, repair and replacement (of plant and equipment)?
    Sight written evidence that the procedures include the entire list above.

  • Section Assessment

Hazard Identification

  • Are all risks associated with each identified hazard adequately assessed and controlled? Seek hazard identification, risk assessments or implementation of standard industry controls. Properly prepared Safe System of Work workplace risk assessments will provide suitable evidence.

  • Section Assessment

Control of Hazards/Risks

  • Have hazards and assessed risks been controlled through a hierarchy of control as far as is reasonably practicable? Examine whether hierarchy of control is applied when hazard controls are implemented. Properly prepared Safe System of Work workplace risk assessments will provide suitable evidence.

  • Section Assessment

Evaluation

  • Has there been a documented evaluation of the effectiveness of the hazard identification / risk assessment process and is there evidence of review and modifications as necessary? Check the frequency of monitoring of controls and that there is written evidence available

  • Section Assessment

Emergency preparedness and response

  • Have all potential emergency situations in this workplace been addressed and have area specific emergency procedures been put in place to minimise illness or injuries. Sight evidence of local procedures for managing accidents and emergencies whilst also accounting for particular, unusual workplace specific hazardous activities. A properly prepare Health and Safety Manual will contain both emergency information and local rules with information relating to the specific workplace

  • Are emergency evacuation procedures displayed and communicated to all staff, students, contractors and visitors? Verify by questioning that workers understand local emergency evacuation procedures including the availability of a Health and Safety Manual for their reference. Check that workers can access the UWA Emergency Procedures booklet and that emergency information posters are displayed.

  • Have responsibilities been allocated for control of emergency situations and have they been communicated such that personnel know who are local First Aiders and Building Wardens? Verify that this is documented and prominently displayed. It should also be shown in the Emergencies section of the Health and Safety Manual.

  • Are emergency response procedures periodically tested and reviewed? The procedures should be tested where practical. Testing should include desk-top analyses where physical testing is not practical. Emergency response procedures should also be reviewed after occurrence of emergencies or accidents.

  • Are all emergency exit routes regularly checked to ensure that they are clearly marked, suitably lit and not obstructed? Verify verbally, by workplace inspection records, conversations with wardens and visual checking.

  • Have the first aid needs of the workplace been assessed and suitable provisions been made? Verify that there are enough trained First Aiders for the workplace. First aid boxes must be clearly marked with a white cross on a green background.

  • Are there arrangements to enable prompt attendance of first aid personnel? Check that trained first aiders work in the area and not routinely working away and that provision is made for when they are away.

  • If after hours working is normal, is provision made for managing emergencies at these times? Check that written instructions exist for this specific occurrence and that affected staff have been suitably instructed.

  • Where applicable, are there any specific workplace arrangements to cater for hearing, mobility or visually-impaired persons? If such personnel are routinely in the workplace, confirm the existence of emergency arrangements which are specific to their needs.

  • Section Assessment

Measurement and Evaluation

  • Are there processes to monitor and measure on a regular basis, the key activities of operational aspects that could cause injury or illness? This could be best verified through Health and Safety Committee meetings minutes but other equivalent processes would also be acceptable provided that there are documented outcomes.

  • Where applicable, is equipment used for monitoring and measurement of WHS risks identified, calibrated, maintained and stored as necessary? Sight calibration and maintenance records.

  • Do the processes incorporated in the WHSMS address the monitoring of:

    a) Health and Safety performance relevant to the local operations and in compliance with the UWA Safe System of Work?

    b) Compliance with relevant WHS legislation?

    If equivalent processes are employed and conform fully with (a) and (b) above then this is acceptable provided that it is understood that the use the UWA Safe System of Work should be implemented in future revisions.

  • Section Assessment

Health surveillance

  • Where applicable, has there been a process of identification of situations where worker health surveillance is required (in accordance with relevant legislation) and have appropriate systems been implemented? Sight health surveillance records and confirm their availability to those being monitored.

  • Section Assessment

Incident investigation, corrective and preventive action

  • Is there an established procedure for investigating and responding to minimise harm caused from incidents? Check that the Confidential Incident, Injury, Near Miss Report Form is properly used?

  • Is there a procedure for investigating and responding to system failures? Check that where system failures have occurred, investigation and corrective, preventative action has been implemented

  • Are staff and other workers aware of the resolution of issues process as set out by UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing? Seek evidence that staff and H&S personnel are aware of this process and how it operates.

  • Are cases of abuse, aggression, violence in the workplace and mental health issues properly managed? Seek evidence that supervisors and managers are aware of how to manage such situations.

  • Section Assessment

Records and Record Management

  • Does the workplace have arrangements for identifying and maintaining WHS records including:

    a) Risk assessments
    b) Outcomes of area inspections
    c) Audits
    d) Hazard reports
    e) Accident / incident reports
    f) Training records demonstrating competency
    g) Standard Operating Procedures for hazardous equipment

    Sight multiple examples of each of the above record types to ensure that appropriate records are maintained to demonstrate conformance to this Standard.

  • Are WHS records stored and maintained in such a way as to protect against damage, deterioration or loss? Verify by examination of the storage system.

  • Are the retention times established and recorded? Sight a process by which they verify that records are current and those which are out of date.

  • Section Assessment

WHS Management System Audit

  • Are there procedures for conducting periodic WHSMS audits by a competent person? This is already addressed by the UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Audit Programme. The execution of this audit program is direct evidence of these arrangements which are fully compliant with the AS/NZS 4801 Standard.

  • Have WHSMS audits with time schedules been documented and implemented? This is already addressed by the UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Audit Programme. If past audits have been completed, sight records of the outcomes.

  • Are audit programs and schedules based on WHS risks and significant aspects of business operations and processes? This is already addressed by the UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Audit Programme. Application of the AS/NZS 4801 Standard based audit process in this area is evidence of its application to significant business operations.

  • Do suitably qualified and independent auditors conduct WHSMS audits? This is already addressed. UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Audit Programme employs internal auditors who have completed training as “Lead auditors” to ensure proper application and professional approach to the conduct of internal audits.

  • Do WHSMS audits assess conformance to all requirements of selected WHSMS Standards and Specifications? UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing audits against the AS/NZS 4801 Standard which in turn implies compliance with the requirements of relevant health and safety legislation.

  • Do the audits cover implementation of WHS procedures and related processes developed for relevant business functions? UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing identifies specific workplaces according to an audit schedule where the importance of the activities carried out is a key selection factors in the overall context of the University’s activities.

  • Are audit results recorded and communicated to relevant personnel and functional levels? This is already addressed by the UWA Safety, Health and Wellbeing Audit Programme. All audit results are reported to stakeholders in the workplace and their completion is reported to the University Safety Committee.

  • Section Assessment

Management Review

  • Is there evidence that review of the WHSMS is carried out by appropriate levels of management to ensure suitability, adequacy, effectiveness and involvement of external stakeholders? Sight written evidence of local reviews of WHSMS.

  • Is responsibility for review of the WHSMS and commitment to continual improvement defined to account for organisational changes and implementation of corrective actions arising from audits? Sight management structure documents and evidence that health and safety responsibilities are appropriately defined.

  • Does senior management review the WHSMS at defined intervals? Sight written confirmation that local senior management engages in high level reviews at regular intervals to ensure adequate provision of resources needed to ensure high quality H&S standards.

  • Section Assessment

Emergency Preparedness and Response

  • Have all potential emergency situations in this workplace been addressed and have area specific emergency procedures been put in place to minimise illness or injuries. Sight evidence of local procedures for managing accidents and emergencies whilst also accounting for particular, unusual workplace specific hazardous activities.

  • Are emergency evacuation procedures displayed and communicated to all staff, students, contractors and visitors?
    Verify through conversation with local individuals that emergency evacuation procedures are understood. Check that workers can access the UWA Emergency Procedures booklet and that emergency information posters are displayed.

  • Have responsibilities been allocated for control of emergency situations and have they been communicated such that personnel know who are local First Aiders and Building Wardens? Verify that this is documented and prominently displayed.

  • Are emergency response procedures periodically tested and reviewed? The procedures should be tested where practical. Testing should include desk-top analyses where physical testing is not practical. Emergency response procedures should also be reviewed after occurrence of emergencies or accidents.

  • Are all emergency exit routes regularly checked to ensure that they are clearly marked, suitably lit and free of obstructions? Verify verbally, by workplace inspection records and then conduct a visual check.

  • Have the first aid needs of the workplace been assessed and suitable provisions been made? Verify that there are enough trained First Aiders in the building, that first aid boxes are clearly marked (with a white cross on a green background).

  • Are there arrangements to enable prompt attendance of first aid personnel? Check that trained first aiders work in the area and not routinely working away and that provision is made for when they are away.

  • If after hours working is normal, is provision made for managing emergencies at these times? Check that written instructions exist for this specific occurrence and that affected staff have been suitably instructed.

  • Where applicable, are there any specific workplace arrangements to cater for hearing, mobility or visually-impaired persons? If such personnel are routinely in the workplace, confirm existence of specific emergency arrangements.

  • Section Assessment

First Aid

  • Have the first aid needs of the workplace been assessed and provided?

    For more information on hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control see Appendix 1 pages 45 to 47in the 2002 Codes of practice: first aid facilities and services, workplace amenities and facilities, personal protective clothing and equipment available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/code_first_aid_0.pdf

  • Are there sufficient First Aid Officers trained in Senior First Aid within the building to ensure that appropriate first aid treatment can be administered for staff, students, contractors and visitors?
    Sight evidence of training programs and at least one, ideally multiple, qualified staff within each work area (having multiple staff who are qualified in senior first aid enables continued cover during officer absences from the workplace.)

    A Checklist for assessing the requirements for first aid facilities is available in Appendix 2 of the 2002 Codes of practice: first aid facilities and services, workplace amenities and facilities, personal protective clothing and equipment available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/code_first_aid_0.pdf.

    The 1996 Occupational Safety and Health Regulation states employers are required to provide the workplace with appropriate first aid facilitators. See section 3.12 (page 30) of the 1996 Occupational Safety and Health Regulation available at http://www.slp.wa.gov.au/pco/prod/FileStore.nsf/Documents/MRDocument:22361P/$FILE/OccupSftyAndHealthRegs1996_08-e0-00.pdf?OpenElement for more information.

  • Are arrangements in place to ensure that first aid personnel have a current certificate?
    Site evidence of system in place that ensures there is continual reviewing of the first aid services and facilities once they are established (e.g. scheduled annual refresher Senior First Aid courses).

  • Are first aid stations/boxes clearly marked with a label having a white cross on a green background?

    For more information on First aid boxes and the appropriate contents see section 1.11 (page 5) and Appendix 3 of the 2002 Codes of practice: first aid facilities and services, workplace amenities and facilities, personal protective clothing and equipment available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/code_first_aid_0.pdf

  • Are arrangements in place to ensure that first aid personnel have a current certificate?
    Site evidence of system in place that ensures there is continual reviewing of the first aid services and facilities once they are established (e.g. scheduled annual refresher Senior First Aid courses).

  • Are all significant injuries reported to the University? Sight evidence of a reporting system including use of the incident/ injury report form.

  • Are staff members aware of first aid arrangements, such as the location of equipment, facilities and personnel?
    Sight evidence of both formal and/or informal provision of information, instruction, and training as well as appropriate supervision of employees. Discuss with both workers and supervisor/manager(s).

    For more information on worker awareness see section 1.7 (page 3) of the 2002 Codes of practice: first aid facilities and services, workplace amenities and facilities, personal protective clothing and equipment available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/code_first_aid_0.pdf

  • Are the names and contact details of the first aid personnel displayed prominently throughout the building and made known to new persons? Sight wall plaques/posters bearing contact details

  • Are there arrangements to enable prompt attendance of first aid personnel?
    Sight communication systems in place which ensures rapid emergency communication with designated first aiders (includes both equipment and procedures).

    Consider the following:
    • The appropriateness and maintenance of the communication equipment available to workers - the requirements will vary depending on the type of workplace (i.e. an office-based work area verses remote areas of Western Australia).
    • The location of the communication equipment.
    • Are contact details of designated first aid officers readily available to cover the workplace during all working periods?
    • Is there a system in place to ensure that the communication system is reliable, effective, frequently checked and appropriately maintained?

  • Are provisions for when the first aid personnel are on annual leave, sick or maternity leave stipulated? Sight evidence of up to date procedures that can be actioned promptly if necessary.

  • Is provision made for out of normal working hours? Sight evidence of formal provision

  • Are travel first aid boxes provided for field staff and are their contents appropriate?

    For further information on appropriate first aid box contents see section 1.11 (page 5) and Appendix 3 of the 2002 Codes of practice: first aid facilities and services, workplace amenities and facilities, personal protective clothing and equipment available at http://www.docep.wa.gov.au/WorkSafe/PDF/Codes_of_Practice/Code_first_aid.pdf

  • Are there any specific hazards requiring specialist first aid training?

    For more information on high risk environments see section 1.1 Establishing first aid facilities and services (page 1) of the 2002 Codes of practice: first aid facilities and services, workplace amenities and facilities, personal protective clothing and equipment available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/code_first_aid_0.pdf

  • Section Assessment

Ergonomics

  • Have activities where there may be ergonomic issues / hazards been assessed and is there a plan to address these issues / hazards appropriate to the workplace (e.g. library repetitive shelving, labs, farms, workshops)?
    Sight the Risk Register or specific Risk Management Plan.

  • Is the appropriate ergonomic set up at the computer workstations (and/or use of laptops) checked at the time of induction of new staff and post graduate students? Sight induction records and evidence of good ergonomic layout at each workstation.

  • Do new staff complete the online Safety and Health modules relating to ergonomic setup? Sight evidence of completion of the online induction via local management’s access to Alesco training records.

  • Are there any posters or flyers on display in relation to correct computer workstation set up? Sight physical evidence.

  • Are the following all provided to employees to ensure appropriate use of equipment and work practices?
    • Posters and other graphical guidance
    • Written guidance
    • Ergonomic assessments
    • Training or external ergonomist referral
    Sight written/physical evidence of all of the above.

  • Are staff members who report discomfort at their computers referred to UWA Safety and Health? Sight incident reports and/or evidence of external ergonomist referrals for workers with reported discomfort.

  • Section Assessment

Psychological Well-Being

  • Are staff members aware of where to find procedures for managing mental health issues (e.g. bullying, harassment, discrimination) in the workplace? Sight induction records

    For more information on bullying please see Part II of the Code of Practice Violence, Aggression and Bullying at work 2010 which is available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/atoms/files/codeviolence.pdf

    For more information on wellness in the workplace view Workplace Wellness in Australia Aligning action with aims: Optimising the benefits of workplace wellness available at http://www.pwc.com.au/industry/healthcare/assets/Workplace-Wellness-Sep10.pdf

  • Is the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) communicated and promoted to staff? Sight induction records

  • Are there EAP posters or flyers on display?

  • Is training (e.g. Mental Health First Aid) offered and communicated to staff? Sight records of first aid programs made available to all staff

  • Are staff members aware of where to access procedures and forms for reporting psychological concerns (e.g. hazard reports, team meetings etc.)

  • Has consultation between employers and workers to establish whether bullying currently exists in the workplace or whether there is potential for bullying to occur, been considered in the planning of the bullying preventative policy? (Note: this process can be both formal and or informal).

    Sight evidence of consultation between manager/supervisor(s) and workers (e.g. surveys, safety and health reviews, minutes taken from meetings etc.).

    • Informal approach - no formal structures exist e.g. workplace meetings, surveys, and direct discussion with workers
    • Formal approach - where safety and health representatives and/or safety and health committees exist in the workplace

  • Section Assessment

Violence and Aggression

  • Have potential risk of violence and aggression been identified, assessed and a plan of action put in place?
    Sight the Risk Register or a specific Violence and Aggression Risk Management Plan.

    For more information on how to identify the hazard and assess the risk of injury or harm occurring see section 3.3.1 & 3.3.2 (pages 6-7) in the 2010 Code of Practice Violence, aggression and bullying at work available at http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/worksafe/PDF/Codes_of_Practice/Code_violence.pdf.

    For an example of a checklist to help find problem areas in the workplace see section 6.0 (pages 15-16) of the 2010 Code of Practice Violence, Aggression and Bullying at Work (see link above). For an example of a risk management plan see pages 13-14 of the 2010 Code of Practice Violence, Aggression and Bullying at Work (see link above).

  • If a risk management plan exists, have items been actioned?
    Sight evidence that items have been actioned.

  • Has a violence and aggression prevention and management policy been developed either independent of or in conjunction with a risk management plan. Sight policy

    Note: Policies should address the three phases of responding to an incident; before, during and after. For more information see Part I chapter 2 (page 10) in the 2010 Code of Practice Violence, Aggression and Bullying at Work (see link above).

  • Is an emergency management system in place which addresses violence and aggression? Note: this should be a part of a safety system set up to deal with all types of emergencies.

    Sight evidence of an emergency management system (e.g. effective communication systems to be used in an emergency, an induction and training in the emergency procedures available to all staff, information available to workers on emergency procedures etc.)

    For more information on what an emergency management system should aim to achieve see section 4.4 (page 12) in the 2010 Code of Practice Violence, Aggression and Bullying at Work (see link above).

  • Has consultation between employers and workers to establish whether bullying currently exists in the workplace or whether there is potential for bullying to occur, been considered in the planning of the bullying preventative policy? (Note: this process can be both formal and or informal).

    Sight evidence of consultation between manager/supervisor(s) and workers (e.g. surveys, safety and health reviews, minutes taken from meetings etc.).

    • Informal approach - no formal structures exist e.g. workplace meetings, surveys, and direct discussion with workers
    • Formal approach - where safety and health representatives and/or safety and health committees exist in the workplace

  • Has the provision of information and training to mangers/supervisors, employees and students regarding risk prevention and management of violence and aggression in the workplace been considered in the planning for work?

    Sight information available and training records. Note: Training records must be kept by the responsible work area, not by UWA Safety and Health.

    For more information on providing information and training see section 3.4 page 9 of the Violence, Aggression and Bullying at Work Code of practice (see link above).
    Examples of information provision could include nature and cause of violence and aggression in your organisation, potential triggers, gender, cultural and diversity discrimination issues, laws and regulations, procedures for responding to a potential incident or one which has already occurred and services available to assist workplace victims.

  • If answered yes or partial to the emergency management system question, have items been actioned?
    Sight evidence that items have been actioned.

  • Section Assessment

Hazardous Manual Handling Tasks

  • Do manual handling risk management plans take layout and design of the work area, equipment, environmental factors and nature of the load into consideration?

    Sight evidence that the following have been considered in the Risk Register/Manual Handling Risk Management Plan:

    • Layout and design of the work area, (i.e. space, work benches, conveyors, furniture and fittings, and equipment used by workers).
    • Provision of equipment which is readily available to awkward reaching postures with one or both hands above shoulder height (e.g. footstools, step ladders, hydra ladder/cheery pickers) that meet relevant Australian Standards.
    • Environmental factors which influence the risk of manual handling been considered in the planning for work (i.e. manual handling risk management plan).
    • Note: environment risk factors may include vibration, temperatures, humidity, wind, slippery or uneven surfaces, obstructions and lighting.
    • appropriateness of the nature, size and weight of things requiring manual handling (e.g. tools, humans, and animals) in regards to the skills and abilities of the involved worker(s) as well as the number of persons available, been considering in the planning for the work (e.g. MHRMP).

    See section 3.4 What are the sources of risk (pages 16-19) in Hazardous Manual Tasks - Code of Practice - Dec 2011 for further information.

  • If a manual handling risk management plan exists, have items been actioned? Sight evidence that items have been actioned.

  • Have specific hazardous manual tasks been considered in the local safety management plan for the workplace?
    Sight the Risk Register or specific Manual Handling Risk Management Plan

  • Have staff/students that undertake jobs involving heavy or repetitive manual handling tasks attended manual handling training in the past 2 years?

    Sight the training records. Note: these must be kept by the responsible work area (not safety and health)

    • Heavy load - determined by the workers personal capacity in conjunction with the nature, size, and weight of the load and number of persons available to handling the load.
    • Repetitive - a movement or force repeated more than twice a minutes
    • Sustained - posture or force is held for more than 30 seconds at one time
    • Awkward – where any part of the body is in an uncomfortable or unnatural position.
    • Vibration – two types: whole body vibration often transmitted via a supporting surface (e.g. driving vehicle on rough terrain, operating heavy earth moving machinery etc.) or hand-arm vibration occurs when vibration is transferred through a vibrating tool, steering wheel or controls in heavy machinery to the hand and arm (e.g. using impact wrenches, chainsaws, jackhammers, grinders, drills or vibrating compacting plates).

    For more detail on characteristics of hazardous manual handling tasks see chapter 2 Identifying hazardous manual tasks (page 7) and 2.2 (page 9) in the Hazardous Manual Tasks - Code of Practice - Dec 2011

  • Are new or inexperienced workers safety inducted into the workplace including being informed of policies and procedures regarding hazardous manual handling?
    Sight induction records.

  • Are staff members who complete hazardous manual handling tasks provided with work-readiness interventions to reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders as part of the planning process for tasks and activities (e.g. staff education, warm-up stretching programs, posters or flyers on display in areas where manual handling frequently occurs etc)? Sight evidence of posters, flyers or similar guidance. Also, records of the any training or education such as emails or training records.

  • Is appropriate manual handling equipment available for staff to use (e.g. trolleys, conveyors, lifting hoists, forklifts, turntables and others)?

    For more information on mechanical aids see section 4.5 Using Mechanical Aids in the Hazardous Manual Tasks - Code of Practice - Dec 2011

  • Are mechanical aids maintained by carrying out regular inspections and servicing in accordance with the manufacturer specification? Sight manufacturer instructions indicating servicing requirements and evidence of compliance.

  • Are regular inspection of the workplace practices and equipment conducted by senior management?
    Sight inspection register, reports or other written evidence.

  • Is there a mechanism in place for staff to report new or modified hazards in the workplace? Sight evidence of use of hazard reporting form.

  • Section Assessment

Dangerous Goods and Chemicals

  • Does the workplace have an up-to-date Hazardous Substances Register which is readily available to all workers?
    Sight register of hazardous chemicals in the workplace.

  • Are Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all hazardous and dangerous chemicals stored or used in this workplace, readily available to all workers?
    Sight storage location and test currency by production of MSDS for several randomly selected chemicals.

  • Do storage areas display clear and compliant safety signage?
    Check that appropriate safety signage is present.

  • Are all chemical containers clearly and compliantly labelled?
    Sight local rules and check several labels directly.

  • Are chemicals appropriately segregated according to dangerous goods classifications?
    Check that this is addressed in local rules and that required segregation is achieved.

  • Are all chemicals stored in appropriate locations and containers (e.g. flammable goods cabinet)?
    Check that the storage arrangements and container types are appropriate.

  • Do you have appropriate written risk assessments and procedures in place for the handling of all hazardous and dangerous chemicals stored or used in this workplace?
    Sight risk assessments for several randomly selected chemicals.

  • Do workers have access to appropriate personal protective equipment (e.g. gloves, glasses, aprons) in accordance with MSDS or risk assessment requirements, for all chemicals used in this workplace?
    Sight local rules or procedure and check for presence of appropriate PPE for any locally used, particularly high risk chemicals.

  • Have workers been adequately trained to take appropriate action in the event of a chemical emergency?
    Sight written evidence of local emergency planning including wall posters and instructions in local rules.

  • Section Assessment

Off-Campus Activities

  • Off-Campus activities include all work which is not carried out directly on UWA property. For many such activities this is of a routine, low risk nature which does not require specific risk assessment. For some, the category of activity implies that hazards could be encountered and Supervisors must give due consideration to assessment of risk and the need for related control measures. Fieldwork is defined as any approved practical work carried out by staff, students or volunteers for the purpose of teaching and / or research more than 5km outside urban areas. Remote fieldwork has additional implications as it includes working at greater distance from communications facilities, being in areas of little traffic, on waterways, in areas where available communication systems may not function adequately to obtain help and where medical or other emergency support is more than one hour away.

  • Do hazard identification processes give consideration to specific task related situations or combinations of circumstances that could give rise to injury or illness and are associated risks adequately assessed and controlled?
    Sight records of hazard identification, risk assessment or routine implementation of standard industry controls.

  • Are risks related to travel by air, overland and by boat included in fieldwork planning and is there a process to ensure that identified control measures are implemented?
    Sight evidence that travel considerations are included in fieldwork plans.

  • Are participants in off-campus activities made aware of associated hazards, control measures which are to be implemented and are they sufficiently trained and supervised?
    Is there a procedure which specifies an induction process/toolbox talk, training and appropriate supervision.

  • Is there a system to demonstrate and record that all risk control measures are implemented?
    Sight completed checklists or other evidence that identified controls are implemented and monitored

  • Are there appropriate first aid provisions for fieldwork?
    Sight evidence that trained first aiders are included in fieldwork teams and are responsible for providing first aid using adequate first aid kit appropriate to the fieldwork undertaken.

  • Is additional training provided for supervisors to ensure understanding of restrictions to be observed in particular areas including fire hazards, cultural considerations, hazardous wildlife and other environment factors?
    Check that there is specific supervisor training for fieldwork or other similar work which is appropriate for the tasks and activities to be undertaken.

  • Is there a formal system specified for managing emergency situations appropriate for the type of work undertaken?
    Sight procedures or instructions regarding management of emergency situations during fieldwork.

  • Is there a formal system specified for maintaining communications and managing potential evacuation of injured persons?
    Sight procedures or instructions which provide guidance appropriate to the type of fieldwork undertaken.

  • What arrangements are made when hiring equipment to ensure that the equipment is suitable and safe for the task?
    Sight procedures or guidance which require evidence that the equipment is safe for use and adequate for the purpose for which it is being hired

  • Section Assessment

Plant and Equipment

  • Is there a current Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for each item of hazardous equipment on display adjacent or as near as practical to it? Sight repository of SOPs and check that they available or displayed near to hazardous equipment. Sight SOPs for several randomly selected items.

  • For hazardous items where no SOP exists, have specific risk assessments been undertaken? Sight risk assessments for randomly selected items. Note: Use of SOPs fulfils the need for risk assessment of equipment and subsequently saves time by avoiding repetitive assessment of the same item as part of every job it is used in.

  • Have risk assessments been undertaken on hazardous processes involving use of new or modified equipment? New or modified hazardous equipment should have SOPs created or revised to reflect current status.
    Sight SOPs for modified or new equipment.

  • Does a supervisor assess equipment to ensure that suitable guards or other protective devices are fitted as protection from dangerous machine parts? Seek evidence that this consideration is properly accounted for i.e via workplace inspections. If no written evidence is available check physically and discuss with workplace Supervisors to confirm.

  • Is all equipment, where appropriate, fitted with suitable and rapid means of isolation from its energy source?
    Check for emergency stop buttons or other suitable isolation devices.

  • Is the equipment maintained in good working order? Sight routine maintenance and/or inspection records.

  • Are there procedures for tagging and lockout of defective equipment?
    Sight procedure or instructions to address this occurrence.

  • Are records kept of all equipment repairs and maintenance?
    Sight maintenance records.

  • Are all users trained, proportionate to the risk and competent to use the tools, machinery and equipment they operate?
    Sight training records and other proofs of assessment of competency.

  • Is there adequate lighting to safely operate equipment or machinery? Assess lighting in the workplace and at work stations to determine adequacy.

  • Are there procedures in place to ensure that the workplace is kept free of obstructions and hazards, and that a good standard of housekeeping is maintained? Sight procedures/instructions which address this.

  • Section Assessment

Noise

  • Have noise hazards been identified, assessed and risk reduction strategies implemented? Sight workplace inspection records or specific noise assessments and associated control measures

  • Are hearing tests conducted for staff involved in noisy work where there may be exposure to high levels of noise?
    Sight records of hearing tests associated with short term, high noise levels. Also any available hazard or incident reports.

  • Where staff maybe exposed to high levels of noise, are they provided with base line testing at the time of employment?
    Sight evidence of initial hearing assessment upon commencement of work types involving high noise levels.

  • Are staff members who have been identified as exposed to high levels of noise tested every 5 years and then again upon exit from employment?
    Sight 5 yearly retesting reports and also reports upon exit from employment.

  • Section Assessment

Biological

General

  • Do all new employees, postgraduates and others required to undertake activities in the workplace, complete a relevant safety induction? Sight induction records.

  • Does the workplace induction specifically highlight the differences between various types of biological safety cabinets, correct installation and operation? Sight the section of the relevant section of the workplace induction document(s).

    For further information see:
    • AS 2647; Biological Safety Cabinets - Installation and Use

  • Do you keep records of inspection of biological safety cabinets? Sight evidence that a NATA approved technician carries out annual inspections and testing, that results are recorded and next inspection dates are diarised.

  • Is a copy of AS/NZS 2243; Safety in Laboratories; Part 3: Microbiological aspects and containment facilities made available to reference? Sight a copy of this standard and evidence that it is used. If not present, it can be obtained via the Maths and Physical Sciences library.

  • Are material safety data sheets (MSDS) readily available in laboratories where hazardous materials are located?
    Sight storage location and test currency by production of MSDS for several randomly selected chemicals.

  • Are UWA Safety and Health procedures for care in use and disposal of sharps well understood and followed?
    Sight evidence that the procedures are available and in use.

  • Are all forms of personal protective equipment (PPE), likely to be required, readily available in the laboratory?
    Sight local rules or procedure and check for presence of appropriate PPE for any locally used, particularly high risk chemicals.

  • Do you have a system to ensure appropriate decontamination of work surfaces is carried out? Sight records demonstrating appropriate decontamination processes and associated checking for cleanliness of surfaces.

    Note: Ethanol or bleach should be readily available for use. The contents of the bottle should be clearly indicated on the label. Appropriate solutions for decontamination are shown in AS/NZS 2243; Safety in Laboratories; Part 3: Microbiological aspects and containment facilities

  • Is there a system of ensuring that workers understand infection control guidelines for prevention of transmission of infectious diseases and do they adhere to it when handling human blood or body fluids? Obtain confirmation via evidence of training and by interviewing workers.

  • Is there a schedule of regular checking that eyewash showers and dump showers are operational and remain in good working order? Sight written evidence of regular testing.

Gene Technology

  • Are all entry doors of OGTR certified facilities clearly labelled? Sight appropriate signage.

  • Is all recombinant DNA project work assessed by the Institutional Biological Safety Committee (IBC)? Sight written evidence of submissions to this committee and related responses.

  • Do you keep written records of maintenance, testing and spore strip evaluations of each autoclave's performance?
    Sight monitoring records.

    Written records must be kept for OGTR inspection and pressure vessels must be regularly inspected. This is required by the Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996; Part 4; Division 4; Reg 4.43; Plant Under Pressure.

Storage

  • Is there a system to ensure that all containers are correctly and legibly labelled?
    Sight procedure or local rules giving instructions in labelling. Also randomly check several containers for compliance.
    ChemAlert can generate labels for most chemicals.

  • Can all specimens that are stored in -20 deg and -80 deg freezers or dewars be readily identified and are they audited at least annually? Sight evidence of an inventory check which is regularly carried out. Confirm that recording processes and system of labelling is effective and identifies contents, owner and date. For large projects a timetable should be provided that outlines a timeframe for their completion after which samples may be disposed of. All freezers should be audited at least annually, and samples no longer required should be disposed of by autoclave or incineration.

Aerosol

  • Do laboratory users know what to do in case of emergency involving hazardous biological materials including spills, theft, or unauthorised movement of samples? Sight written evidence of local emergency planning including wall posters and instructions in local rules.

    For further information see:
    • AS/NZS 2243; Safety in Laboratories; Part 3
    • UWA Safety and Health Laboratory Safety Course Notes

  • Is all work where biological aerosols are produced carried out in a biological safety cabinet or a closed vessel?
    Sight procedure or local rule to confirm that this is local practice.

Waste Management

  • Do you have a system to ensure contaminated waste procedures/guidelines are adopted and adhered to? All waste should be disposed of by autoclaving or incineration.
    If no autoclave or means of incineration is present in the department, where are samples sent for disposal, and how are they transported? Sight evidence that these systems of work are used and are effective.

  • For autoclaves used for decontamination is their effectiveness assessed and are users notified of this?
    This should be initially checked for the temperature of the autoclave panel. If this is so, there should be spore tests or chemical checks carried out to ensure conformity. These should be done monthly for OGTR, and six monthly for non-OGTR work. Sight assessment records and confirm that method exists for informing users of current status.

  • Are records kept to show that autoclaves have been inspected by a competent person?
    Sight evidence of competence and signatory endorsement of assessments.

    As required by the Occupational Safety and Regulations 1996 Part 4, Division 4, Reg 4.43 - Plant Under Pressure.

Training

  • It is a requirement for laboratory users to attend the UWA Laboratory Safety training course and is this reflected in training records?
    Sight evidence of attendance through training records.

  • Is there a process for restricting access to PC2 facilities to authorised personnel only?
    Discuss the process and establish whether it is effective.

  • Is there guidance which specifies controlled transportation of potentially infectious materials?
    Sight evidence of a procedure which is used to achieve this.

  • Are PC2 facilities inspected or audited with outcomes reported to the UWA Biosafety Committee?
    Sight written evidence of submissions

  • Where there is potential for contamination from infectious materials, is there a procedure defining requirements for health monitoring and vaccination? Sight evidence of monitoring data and vaccination records.

  • Section Assessment

Radiation

  • Do you have adequate systems to record receipt, holdings, transfer and disposal of radioactive materials, irradiating apparatus and electronic products as required under the Radiation Safety (General) Regulations 1983?
    Sight written evidence of all of the above.

  • Do you have systems to ensure that your laboratory design complies with Standards Australia AS/NZS 2243.4 and 2982 and that it is registered under the WA Radiation Safety Act regulations?
    Sight written evidence of (a) registration of the laboratory kept by UWA Safety and Health (b) Written evidence that the laboratory design has been confirmed as compliant.

  • Do you have systems to ensure appropriate registrations, licenses and protocols are in place and updated or renewed where necessary? Sight written evidence that the workplace is inspected and that registrations, licenses and protocols are updated to reflect changes.

  • Do you have systems to ensure specific areas for radiation procedures are designated and suitably identified?
    Sight signage, instructions and other information which effectively highlights the area designation.

  • Do you have systems that ensure occupants of the laboratory are suitably supervised, trained, instructed and have knowledge of, and access to, local radiation working rules?
    Sight induction and training records. Question laboratory users to establish knowledge of where to find local rules.

  • Do you have systems to ensure appropriate survey monitoring equipment is readily available and calibrated?
    Sight evidence of regular recalibrations and stickers on equipment showing last and next recalibration dates.

  • Do you have systems to ensure personal monitoring procedures are in place, adhered to and dose records are kept?
    Sight written evidence of dose records and the procedure for collection and sending off film badges for analysis.

  • Do you have systems to ensure appropriate direct and indirect (wipe testing) monitoring is carried out and recorded?
    Sight written evidence of regular workplace contamination monitoring.

  • Do you have systems to ensure appropriate and sufficient shielding is available for the procedures being undertaken?
    Sight evidence that radiation shielding requirements are assessed prior to introduction of radiation to the work bench.

  • Do you have systems to ensure radioactive waste/storage procedures are in place and adhered to?
    Sight evidence that these systems of work are used and are effective

  • Do you have systems to ensure the occupants of the laboratory have adequate training and equipment to take necessary action in the event of an emergency involving radiation?
    Sight written evidence of local emergency planning including wall posters and instructions in local rules.

  • Section Assessment

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