Audit

WEEKLY ACCIDENT REVIEW

The week of September 2, 2013, Southland Industries reported one injury. The injury happened in the Southern California Division.

The only injury of the week happened at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden in Indian Wells, California. A service technician had completed his work, replacing a condenser fan motor. He had re-energized the equipment, when he noticed that a screw was missing. While attempting to fasten the screw, the fan blade struck his finger causing a laceration. He was seen by a physician and diagnosed with a fracture as well as a laceration. He was released to modified duty. The employee was not wearing gloves and did not lock out the equipment before attempting to replace the screw. He was in violation of two policies which would have prevented or minimized the injury.

WEEKLY TOPIC

LockOut/TagOut

Anyone who operates, cleans, services, adjusts, and repairs machinery or equipment should be aware of the hazards associated with that machinery. Any powered machinery or electrical equipment that can move in a way that would put people in danger is a hazard that can be prevented by following locking or tagging procedures. Failure to lock out or tag power sources on equipment can result in electrocutions, amputations, and other serious-sometimes fatal-accidents.

Just this past week there were 4 stories in the news about workers who died doing their job related to not having control of hazardous energy. What are the most common causes of these accidents?
• The machine or piece of equipment was not completely shut off before a maintenance or repair operation. Not only must the machine be turned off but also the power source that goes to it.
• The machine was turned on accidentally, either out of carelessness or because the person who turned it on didn't realize that another worker was there and could get hurt.
• The machine wasn't working correctly but wasn’t fixed, turned off, locked or tagged, and someone who didn't know about the problem used it.
• Moving equipment wasn't blocked.
• Safety procedures were inadequate or hadn't been properly explained.

Remember the dangers and be on your guard around any machinery and moving equipment. Even if you don't operate the machinery, you could get caught in it and injured if it isn’t properly disconnected. So what can you do to prevent accidental injury from moving machinery?

• Ensure you know the hazardous energy associated with your equipment prior to doing any work on it.
• Ensure you know all the energy that could affect the task (electric, gravity, water, pneumatic, hydraulic, steam, etc.)
• Ensure you control the accidental release of the energy prior to working on the equipment through lockout, tagout or alternative measures identified for your specific equipment.
• Never reach into moving equipment. In even the blink of an eye you could have a life changing injury.
• Test the energy after you believe it to be isolated. This is one of the most overlooked steps and probably the most important. Employees think they have isolated the energy at the source, but it isn't for one reason or another.
• Be aware of your personal safety and the safety of others when working with or around moving equipment and machinery. Always follow proper lockout and tagout procedures, even for a quick or minor repair!

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OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVEMENT

Opportunities for improvement are ALWAYS welcome! Use the Opportunity for Improvement template on iAuditor to submit.

JOBSITE SAFETY CHECKLIST
Select date

Job Name:

Job Number:

Checked By:

Signature:
1. RECORDKEEPING

a. Notices, Posters (5-in1, OSHA Notice, Payroll)

b. Emergency Contacts

c. OSHA 300 Log

2. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

a. In use: Safety glasses, Hard hats, Work boots, Gloves

b. Face shields or goggles used for overhead work

c. Respirators available

d. Welding screens

3. FIRST AID KITS

a. Available in gang box and job site trailer

b. Stocked adequately with gloves, bandages, and antiseptics

c. CPR and First Aid trained personnel

d. Medical facility location and contact information communicated

4. SCAFFOLDS

a. Competent person certified

b. Scaffold grade planking

c. Fall protection

d. Clear of debris / trash

5. LADDERS

a. Free from defects with safety feet, blocked, cleated, or otherwise secured.

b. Straight ladders at 1:4 pitch

6. CYLINDERS

a. Capped, stored in an upright position

b. Oxygen / Acetylene properly separated

c. Empty gas cylinders marked

7. TOOLS / EQUIPMENT

a. Inspected to ensure safe operating condition

b. Hand tools free from defects

c. Unsafe / Unusable tools / equipment tagged "Do Not Use"

d. Tools / Equipment properly guarded

8. HOUSEKEEPING

a. Maintained

b. Aisles and exit ways clear with 24" clearance

c. Work areas uncluttered and debris removed

9. ELECTRICAL

a. Electrical equipment grounded

b. Tools double insulated

c. Cords in good condition

d. Electrical panels covered if energized

10. FALL PROTECTION

a. Guard rails, mid rails, toe boards

b. Fall restraint systems

c. Open sides floors or platforms equipped with standard railing

d. Openings (interior / perimeter) properly barricaded or covered

11. FIRE PREVENTION

a. Flammable and explosive materials stored safely

b. Adequate number of fire extinguishers available with tags and clips

c. Vehicles and mobile equipment provided with extinguishers

12. EXCAVATIONS

a. Over 4 ft shored, benched, or sloped as required

b. Steps or ladders at 25 ft intervals

c. Competent person on site

13. HAZARD COMMUNICATION

a. MSDS and Labels available

b. Employees briefed on HAZCOM

c. HAZCOM information poster posted

d. Employees familiar with MSDS books and their location

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Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.