Audit

1. RIGHTS
1.1 The service or program, its staff and its volunteers treat individuals with dignity and respect.

Individuals are satisfied they have experienced being treated with respect and dignity.

Staff and volunteers can describe what treating individuals with dignity and respect means in practice, and provide examples of their practice.

Staff and volunteers can describe what treating individuals with dignity and respect means in practice, and provide examples of their practice.

Service information (such as mission or vision statements and service brochures) includes a commitment to respect and dignity.

1.2 The service or program, its staff and its volunteers recognise and promote individual freedom of expression.

Individuals are satisfied that their freedom of expression is supported and promoted, and describe how they seek, receive and share information and opinions.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement how they ensure that an individual has the freedom to seek, receive and share information and opinions.

A range of accessible information sources are available and used by individuals.

Service information (such as mission or vision statements and service brochures) includes a commitment to freedom of expression.

1.3 The service or program supports active decision-making and individual choice, including the timely provision of information in appropriate formats to support individuals, families, friends and carers to make informed decisions and understand their rights and responsibilities.

Individuals are satisfied that they are provided information in suitable formats, and that the service supports their decision-making and choice.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement how they ensure that an individual understands the information provided.

Records show the involvement of individuals, families, friends and carers in the development and review of information.

Records show that information is reviewed regularly to ensure that it is accurate, current and relevant, and the review process involves individuals, families, friends and carers.

Written policies and procedures are in place, which outline the range of information and format types to be provided to individuals, families, friends and carers from commencement to leaving a service.

1.4 The service or program provides support strategies that are based on the minimal restrictive options and are contemporary, evidence-based, transparent and capable of review.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates can describe how support strategies are developed and adapted to support human rights.

Staff can describe the frameworks supporting everyday practice.

Individualised plans show that actions, services and supports are based on contemporary evidence.

Records show that research is used to benchmark against contemporary best practice (such as database searches or information exchange with similar services).

Records show that staff participate in learning and development activities aimed at understanding contemporary practice frameworks (including minimal restrictive options) and improving practice.

Records document continuous review of practice to ensure relevance, appropriateness and transparency.

1.5 The service or program has preventative measures in place to ensure that individuals are free from discrimination, exploitation, abuse, harm, neglect and violence.

Individuals report being provided with information (in appropriate formats) that outlines how the service will ensure they are free from harm, neglect, abuse and violence.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement how they ensure individuals are free from harm, neglect, abuse and violence and can provide examples of when and how this has been done.

Staff and management are provided with training (beginning at induction) on the safeguarding of rights and freedom from harm, neglect, abuse and violence, and particularly on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Written policies and procedures that safeguard individuals rights and freedom from harm, neglect, abuse and violence are upheld in place and applied. These are, at a minimum, consistent with relevant legislative and regulatory frameworks.

Written policies and procedures provide guidance on roles and responsibilities in responding to alleged/suspected/actual critical incidents.

1.6 The service or program addresses any breach of rights promptly and systemically to ensure opportunities for improvement are captured.

Individuals report being provided with information (in appropriate formats) regarding their rights when accessing a service, how their rights will be safeguarded and how any infringements will be addressed.

Staff and management are able to describe the systems that are in place to investigate and respond to breaches of rights, key obligations of the organisation and how they relate to their role.

Senior management regularly review outcomes from incidents and use trends and themes to improve services.

Written policies and procedures are in place that detail actions to be taken in response to any breach of rights. This would include how to initiate, investigate and report on a claim regarding an infringement of an individual’s rights.

Records relating to alleged/ suspected/actual incidents describe actions taken to respond to the incident, supports provided to individuals, families, friends and carers and how the outcome was reported to relevant parties.

Records show that relevant supports are offered to the individual, family, friends or carer during the course of an investigation.

1.7 The service or program supports individuals with information, and if needed, access to legal advice and/or advocacy.

Individuals report being provided with information (in appropriate formats) from the time of commencement of the service, which outline external advisory and/or advocacy services available and how to access such supports.

Ways to access external advice and support is promoted in service publications.

Culturally appropriate assistance is provided to people from diverse cultural backgrounds in order to access external advice and advocacy.

Records indicate that staff use proactive strategies to enable involvement of external advocates.

Management can describe their legislative responsibilities in relation to facilitating access to independent advice and advocacy.


Written policy and procedures are in place to guide practice on the promotion of and facilitation of access to independent advice and advocacy.

1.8 The service or program recognises the role of families, friends, carers and advocates in safeguarding and upholding the rights of people with disability.

Families, friends, carers and advocates report that a range of supports are provided to assist them to fulfil their roles (e.g. referral to external supports in the case of an investigation).

Staff and management are required to describe and implement ways in which they include families, friends, carers and advocates in their everyday practice.

Written policies and procedures include reference to the role of families, friends, carers and advocates in upholding the rights of individuals.

Publicly available service information promotes the role of families, friends, carers and advocates and includes examples of how they can be involved.

Records show how families, friends, carers and advocates are involved in safeguarding and upholding the rights of people with disability

1.9 The service or program keeps personal information confidential and private.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement how they maintain confidentiality and privacy of personal information at an everyday level.

Individuals report being provided with information (in appropriate formats) which outlines how their personal information will be kept private and confidential. This would also include an explanation of when it may be necessary and lawful to share such information (e.g. referrals) with consent. This would also include when it is lawful and appropriate to a service to share personal information without consent (mandatory reporting).

Records describe how consent to release or share information is sought using methods appropriate for each individual.

The physical environment supports the maintenance of privacy in the course of everyday activities.

Systems are in place to ensure personal information is physically secure and safe, including the use and transfer of electronic information.

Written policies and procedures outline how personal information is dealt with (including destruction of personal information) and ensure compliance with relevant legislative and regulatory frameworks.

2. PARTICIPATION & INCLUSION
2.1 The service or program actively promotes a valued role for people with disability, of their own choosing.

Individuals report playing an active part in identifying options for participation and inclusion.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement why it is important to promote and support a valued role for people with disability in the community, and how this can be achieved.

Written and communicated policy is in place that outlines the service’s approach to promoting a valued role for people with disability in the broader community.

Organisational planning processes (strategic and operational) include activities aimed at promoting a valued role for people with disability.

Records provide evidence of people with disability participating in activities that support valued roles in the community.

2.2 The service or program works together with individuals to connect to family, friends and their chosen communities.

Individuals describe connections with family, friends and chosen communities.

Frontline staff can describe how they support individuals to connect to family, friends and their chosen communities on a day-to-day basis.

Written policies and procedures are in place to identify and regularly review chosen communities and support networks (including, but not limited to, family and friends) as part of individualised planning.

Records show individualised planning includes consideration and regular review of chosen communities and support networks and relevant support strategies.

2.3 Staff of the service or program understand, respect and facilitate individual interests and preferences, in relation to work, learning, social activities and community connection over time.

Individuals report having accessed a range of preferred activities within their chosen communities.

Staff are provided with training and information about the importance of connection and inclusion for the wellbeing of people with disability.

Staff can identify a range of innovative ways to support individual interests and preferences.

Written and communicated policy is in place that outlines the approach to promoting and supporting individual interests and preferences in a range of areas.

2.4 Where appropriate, the service or program works with an individual’s family, friends, carer or advocate to promote community connection, inclusion and participation.

Family and friends report having been involved (with appropriate consent) in individualised planning and review.

Where an advocate has been utilised, written evidence is in place that details activities and any relevant actions arising from this involvement.

Written and communicated policy is in place that outlines the approach to working with family, friends and carers in the delivery of services or supports.

Written and communicated policy is in place that outlines how and when the service facilitates access to individual advocates.

2.5 The service or program works in partnership with other organisations and community members to support individuals to actively participate in their community.

Staff can describe partnerships with other relevant organisations to support individuals.

Written policy and procedures are in place to guide liaison and collaboration with other agencies.

Service information (such as mission or vision statements and service brochures) includes a commitment to working with other organisations, where this supports individuals to participate.

Records show an active network of collaboration with other agencies aimed at supporting employment, learning, social activities and community connection.

2.6 The service or program uses strategies that promote community and cultural connection for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Individuals can describe how the service has responded to the cultural needs or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Management can describe how they lead a culture of respect and acknowledgement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

Staff can describe how they respect and promote cultural awareness in their everyday practice.

Staff participate in relevant training, where necessary, regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness.

Strategic and operational plans detail how the service responds helps to promote cultural connection, at both an organisational and individual level.

Written and communicated policy is in place that outlines an organisation-wide commitment to supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

Service information is available languages that is appropriate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and their families, friends and carers

3. INDIVIDUAL OUTCOMES
3.1 The service or program works together with an individual and, with consent, their family, friends, carer or advocate to identify their strengths, needs and life goals.

Individuals describe how they work with and are supported by the service to identify and act on, their needs and life goals.

Individuals describe how they work with and are supported by the service to identify and act on, their needs and life goals.

Written and communicated policy and procedures are in place that demonstrates a person-centred approach to service delivery.

Records show how feedback is sought from people with disability on the most appropriate ways to collaboratively work together to identify strengths, needs and life goals.

Individual plans show that the overall wellbeing of the person with disability is taken into consideration (where appropriate) through individualised planning and review.

3.2 Individual plans show that the overall wellbeing of the person with disability is taken into consideration (where appropriate) through individualised planning and review.

People with disability describe how they have choice/lead and direct the process of service planning.

Families, friends and carers report being actively involved, with consent, in the process of individualised planning and review.

The service has clear guidelines regarding how families, friends, carers and advocates can be involved in decision-making, and how consent for their involvement is determined.

Frontline staff can describe how they support the active involvement of people with disability in making decisions and life choices, including the involvement of an independent advocate when necessary.

Where an advocate has been utilised, written evidence is in place that details activities and any relevant actions arising from this involvement.

Records show that individualised planning includes an active consideration of risk against benefits when supporting individual choice.

3.3 The service or program plans, delivers and regularly reviews services or supports against measurable life outcomes.

Individuals describe how they participate in reviews of services or supports.

The practice of individualised planning, and review, is centred on the expressed strengths, needs and life goals of individuals accessing the service.

Staff can provide examples of individual life outcomes and how they are measured, and how they are reviewed with individuals and (where relevant) families, friends, carers or advocates.

Written policy and procedures are in place to guide assessment and needs identification as the first stage in individualised planning.

Records show that individualised planning includes expressed individual choices.

Records show that the achievement of life outcomes is monitored and reviewed regularly as part of the individualised planning process, and plans are modified where necessary to remain relevant and responsive."

3.4 Service planning and delivery is responsive to diversity including disability, age, gender, culture, heritage, language, faith, sexual identity, relationship status, and other relevant factors.

Individuals can describe how the service has responded to relevant diversity factors, such as faith, culture, relationship status and so on.

Management can describe how they lead a culture of respect and tolerance in relation to diversity.

Staff can describe how they respect and promote diversity in their everyday practice.

Staff participate in relevant training, where necessary, regarding population diversity, cultural competency and implications for service delivery.

Strategic and operational plans detail how the service responds to diversity, at both an organisational and individual level.

Service planning includes identification of the demographic characteristics of individuals accessing the service, as well as their families, friends and carers.

Written and communicated policy is in place that outlines an organisation-wide commitment to supporting diversity.

Service information is available in commonly used languages of individuals and their families, friends and carers.

3.5 The service or program collaborates with other service providers in planning service delivery and to support internal capacity to respond to diverse needs.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates can describe how other agencies are involved (where necessary) in supporting the individual’s life goals.

Service planning demonstrates collaboration with other support agencies to respond to the diverse needs.

Staff can describe how they refer to and then collaborate with other service providers in meeting the diverse needs of individuals.

Management can describe how they source external support to develop responses to diverse need.

Individualised planning indicates the involvement of other service providers to respond to diverse need.

4. FEEDBACK & COMPLAINTS
4.1 Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates are actively supported to provide feedback, make a complaint or resolve a dispute without fear of adverse consequences.

Individuals, families, friends and carers report a willingness to provide feedback, including negative feedback or complaints.

Individuals, families, friends and carers report active support when providing feedback, making a complaint or dealing with a dispute.

Written policies and procedures provide guidance on consistent practice in encouraging feedback.

Written policy and procedures provide guidance on the management of complaints and dispute resolution, including timeframes.

The service develops and implements a range of feedback mechanisms, as part of organisational planning and service provision.

Records show regular organisation-wide consultation processes and activities involve people with disability, families, friends, carers and advocates e.g. annual surveys, planning events, focus groups, and advisory committees.

4.2 Feedback mechanisms, including complaints resolution and how to access independent support, advice and representation, are clearly communicated to individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates.

Individuals, families, friends and carers report being provided with a range of information (at the commencement of service and at regular intervals) on how to provide feedback, including complaints and disputes, in a non-threatening and inclusive manner.

Written policy and procedures outline consistent practice relating to enabling access to independent advice and representation.

On commencement of a service, information is provided (in a range of formats) to individuals, families, friends and carers on how to provide feedback, including how complaints and disputes will be managed and how to access independent support, advice and representation.

Records of intake and assessment show that the provision of this information to individuals has occurred.

Records describe how individuals, families, friends and carers are involved in the development and review of information about feedback mechanisms to ensure relevance and appropriateness.

4.3 Complaints are resolved together with the individual, family, friends, carer or advocate in a proactive and timely manner.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates describe their experience of the complaints process as collaborative, proactive and timely.

Management and staff can describe how they resolve complaints and disputes in collaboration with individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates.

Complaints and dispute resolution policy and processes outline clear actions, timelines to be followed and mechanisms used to ensure independent review.

Records demonstrate that the complaints process is tailored to meet individuals’ needs (e.g. culturally diverse client-base; using appropriately structured questions to gather relevant information; people with a vision-impairment receiving their complaint statement on a tape; supporting the complainant to choose the mechanism and/or venue for making their complaint statement).

Records of complaints show policy and procedure is followed, and includes actions taken because of complaint.

4.4 The service or program seeks and, in conjunction with individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates, reviews feedback on service provision and supports on a regular basis as part of continuous improvement.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates report active participation in the review of feedback and can describe how it informs changes in practice.

Senior management can describe regular review and analysis of feedback (including themes and trends) and how this is used for decision making and planning.

The service uses continuous improvement processes and systems to support the review and analysis of feedback, including the use of relevant information support systems.

Records show the involvement of individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates, in the review of feedback.

4.5 The service or program develops a culture of continuous improvement using compliments, feedback and complaints to plan, deliver and review services for individuals and the community.

Staff, management and the governing body can articulate the importance of continuous improvement and its impact on quality service provision.

Records indicate outcomes from complaints and disputes are regularly reviewed by senior management and shared with the governing body as relevant.

Staff are provided with training and information on how feedback (including complaints) can be sought, acknowledged, analysed and utilised for service planning, provision and improvement.

Every day practice of staff seeking feedback and supporting feedback processes can be observed.

Written policy and procedures support a ‘no blame’ approach to the management of complaints and negative feedback.

4.6 The service or program effectively manages disputes.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement the systems in place for dispute resolution and how outcomes from disputes inform continuous improvement.

Staff report they are provided with information on how disputes are resolved within the organisation at commencement of employment.

Systems for dispute resolution include reference to external representative, advisory and complaints resolution bodies, including how to access such services.

Written policy and procedures are in place that outline how disputes are resolved, including reference to any relevant legislative obligations.

5. SERVICE ACCESS
5.1 The service or program systematically seeks and uses input from people with disability, their families, friends and carers to ensure access is fair and equal and transparent.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates report their involvement in providing feedback about access, including barriers to access.

Eligibility criteria are regularly reviewed to ensure transparency and equity.

Rationale for eligibility criteria and assessment decisions are provided both formally and informally.

Regular consultation activities include input on access and potential barriers to access.

Consultation activities include seeking feedback from members of the community not currently accessing a service regarding access and potential barriers to access.

5.2 The service or program provides accessible information in a range of formats about the types and quality of services available

Staff and management are required to describe and implement how they ensure that individuals understand information provided.

Written policies and procedures are in place that outline the range of information and format types to be provided to individuals, families, friends and carers from commencement through to leaving a service.

Records show the involvement of individuals, families, friends and carers in the development and review of information according to their needs.

Records show that information is regularly reviewed (as part of continual improvement) to ensure accuracy, currency and relevance, with the involvement of individuals, families, friends and carers.

5.3 The service or program develops, applies, reviews and communicates commencement and leaving a service processes.

Staff can describe commencement and cessation processes.

Management and the governing body can describe processes within the context of legislation, service and funding agreements.

Written policy and procedures guide all activities relating to commencement and/or leaving a service.

Processes are developed in line with relevant legislation and regulation.

Processes include the provision of relevant information on alternative service options and referral points (where necessary) upon leaving a service.

Information, in appropriate formats, is provided to individuals, families, friends and carers, and where appropriate, advocates, on the processes for commencement and leaving a service.

Records relating to the leaving a service show a clear and transparent rationale.

Processes (and relevant information) are regularly reviewed as part of a continuous improvement system, with input from individuals, families, friends and carers.

5.4 The service or program develops, applies, reviews and communicates commencement and leaving a service processes.

Written policy and procedures guide the development and application of eligibility criteria, priority of access and waiting lists.

Policy and procedures are developed within the context of relevant legislation and regulation such as the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

Records of intake and assessment show policy and procedures are followed.

Policy and procedures are regularly reviewed as part of a continuous improvement system, with input from individuals, families, friends and carers

5.5 The service or program monitors and addresses potential barriers to access.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates report being involved in regular audits of the physical environment in which services are provided.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates report being involved in regular audits of service delivery with a focus beyond the physical environment (such as communication, frontline services or programs).

Management and staff can identify potential barriers to access and describe how these have been addressed.

Records indicate how barriers to access have been addressed.

Records indicate regular review and benchmarking of client data to identify potential gaps in access.

5.6 The service or program provides clear explanations when a service is not available along with information and referral support for alternative access.

The service maintains up-to-date information on referral support for alternative access.

Management provide clear and transparent rationale when a service is not available, guided by developed eligibility criteria, priority of access and waiting list policy and procedures.

Staff can describe processes for information provision and referral support and describe examples relevant to their role.

Processes include the provision of relevant information on alternative service options and referral points in appropriate formats.

5.7 The service or program collaborates with other relevant organisations and community members to establish and maintain a referral network.

Strategic and operational planning describes activities aimed at maintaining a referral network.

Records show the regular review of options for referral to ensure appropriateness and quality.

Records indicate the service is an active member of referral networks.

Staff can describe how they refer to other agencies who may simultaneously deliver support and how they collaborate (e.g. communicate or plan together) to achieve shared outcomes.

6. SERVICE MANAGEMENT
6.1 Frontline staff, management and governing bodies are suitably qualified, skilled and supported.

Staff can communicate their key responsibilities according to their role as well as the organisation’s vision, mission and value statements, and have a clear understanding of reporting and management structures.

Feedback from managers and staff confirms that managers are supported in their functions as leaders.

Written policies and procedures guide recruitment and selection, induction and ethical conduct for all staff, management, governing bodies and volunteers, including position descriptions that outline required skills and knowledge (e.g. up to date records of qualifications and legal requirements, such as police clearances).

Individuals, families, friends and carers are provided with the opportunity to participate in recruitment activities and performance review.

The governing body, management, staff and volunteers have access to learning and development opportunities relevant to their role and function.

An up-to-date organisational chart is publicly available, including key decision-making roles, lines of management and delegation authority.

6.2 Practice is based on evidence and minimal restrictive options and complies with legislative, regulatory and contractual requirements.

Records show research is used to benchmark against contemporary best practice (such as database searches or information exchange with similar services).

Records show staff, management and governing bodies participate in learning and development activities aimed at understanding contemporary practice frameworks (including minimal restrictive option) and improving practice.

Records document continuous review of practice to ensure relevance, appropriateness and transparency.

Records show that the specific use of restrictive practice is monitored and reviewed regularly.

6.3 The service or program documents, monitors and effectively uses management systems including Work Health Safety, human resource management and financial management.

Management can describe their legislative, regulatory and contractual obligations.

Clearly defined strategic, business and operational/program plans are maintained, with goals, objectives, targets and performance indicators.

Planning processes include the consideration of emerging communities, demographic change, future needs and opportunities for service development.

Written policy and procedures are in place to ensure a safe and healthy environment for staff and individuals accessing the service.

Regular Work Health Safety audits are undertaken to identify potential safety hazards, ensure issues are addressed and inform continuous improvement.

Written policy and procedures are in place and followed for Human Resource Management, including industrial relations, organisational development, workforce planning and performance management.

Written policies and procedures are in place and followed for risk management, which includes (at a minimum) a risk register and monitoring risks associated with workplace, travel, individual’s home environment and weather conditions (i.e. extreme weather).

Written policies and procedures are in place and followed for financial management, including administration, delegation, approvals and other obligations (e.g. service agreements).

6.4 The service or program has monitoring, feedback, learning and reflection processes which support continuous improvement.

Individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates report being offered (and where appropriate, taking) opportunities to participate in review and improvement activities.

Staff and management are required to describe and implement how they are encouraged to reflect on their everyday practice as part of a continuous improvement system.

Staff, management and the governing body can articulate the benefits of continuous improvement and can provide examples of participation in continuous improvement activities.

Staff and management participate in relevant networks with other service providers and organisations to share and develop good practice.

Continuous improvement activities are embedded within strategic and operational planning.

Continuous improvement activities are coordinated at a senior level within the service and responsibilities are clearly communicated to staff and management.

Records show that senior management regularly reviews and analyses information (including themes and trends) arising from continuous improvement activities and uses this for decision making and planning.

Records indicate participation in a Quality Management System.

6.5 The service or program has a clearly communicated organisational vision, mission and values which are consistent with contemporary practice.

Individuals, families, friends and carers demonstrate an understanding of the vision, mission and values, and report having been involved in their development.

Staff, management and the governing body can apply organisational values in everyday practice across all levels of the organisation.

Induction and regular staff sessions are offered which reinforce the vision, mission and values.

Vision, mission and value statements exist which guide person-centred service provision and support the achievement of individual outcomes.

Vision, mission and value statements are displayed in premises, included in information packages and promoted in service brochures.

Records describe the processes undertaken to include staff, individuals, their families, friends and carers in determining or reviewing vision, mission and values.

6.6 The service or program has systems to strengthen and maintain organisational capabilities to directly support the achievement of individual goals and outcomes.

Staff report participating in regular performance planning and review and can articulate the link between individual goals and outcomes and their own capability.

A human resource management plan is in place that addresses areas such as performance planning and review, workforce planning, recruitment and retention and learning and development.

Avenues are available for the regular provision of feedback (both positive and negative) on staff capabilities from individuals, families, friends and carers.

Performance plans outline staff development needs and highlight opportunities to improve skills and knowledge.

Policies and procedures regarding learning and development for all staff, management, governing bodies and volunteers are in place and followed, including at a minimum, a qualifications and training register.

A regular program is in place for induction and other learning and development with a focus in individual goals and outcomes.

6.7 The service or program uses person-centred approaches including the active involvement of people with disability, families, friends, carers and advocates to review policies, practices, procedures and service provision.


A human resource management plan is in place that addresses areas such as performance planning and review, workforce planning, recruitment and retention and learning and development.

Avenues are available for the regular provision of feedback (both positive and negative) on staff capabilities from individuals, families, friends and carers.

Performance plans outline staff development needs and highlight opportunities to improve skills and knowledge.

Policies and procedures regarding learning and development for all staff, management, governing bodies and volunteers are in place and followed, including at a minimum, a qualifications and training register.

A regular program is in place for induction and other learning and development with a focus in individual goals and outcomes."

Individuals, families, friends and carers report being offered (and where appropriate, taking) the opportunity to participate in regular service reviews and other improvement planning activities.

Staff, management and the governing body can describe the consultative approaches relevant to their role within the service, and how they use them.

A range of consultation approaches are developed and implemented that meet the unique needs of people with disability, families, friends, carers and advocates.

Records show regular organisation-wide consultation processes and activities involve individuals, families, friends, carers and advocates such as annual surveys, planning events, focus groups and advisory and governance committees or Boards.

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Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.