Title Page

  • Name of Business / Applicant

  • Licensing Officer

  • Conducted on

  • An application is being made for an Animal Activity Licence covering the activity of selling animals as pets. This is required by the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 and is defined in Schedule 1 to the regulations as;

    "2. Selling animals as pets (or with a view to their being later resold as pets) in the course of a business including keeping animals in the course of a business with a view to their being so sold or resold."

    There are generic conditions that all Animal Activity Licences have to comply with in Schedule 2 to the regulations and then specific conditions for home boarding are set out in Schedule 3. The licence conditions and guidance on how to comply with these are also available in the DEFRA document 'guidance notes for conditions for providing home boarding for dogs - October 2018'. this document is available on our website at the following address;

  • Charnwood Borough Council's Animal Activity Licence website
    http://www.charnwood.gov.uk/animalwelfare

  • Is a Veterinary Inspector accompany the Licensing Officer on this visit

  • Name of Veterinary Inspector

  • This document provides a summary of the inspection and the Licensing Officers assessment against the licence conditions. It will also confirm the Licensing Officers risk rating and resulting star rating, which determines how long the licence is issued for. We will also give you information on what you can do if you are not happy with any of the Animal Activity Licensing process.

  • Civica Reference Number

Applicant

  • Applicants Name / Job Title

  • Address

  • Main Telephone Number

  • Other Telephone Number

  • E-mail Address

  • Is the applicant over 18

  • Business Name

  • Website Address

  • Has the applicant, or any person who will have control or management of the establishment, ever been disqualified from;

  • Has the applicant, or any person who will have control or management of the establishment, been convicted of any offences under the Animal Welfare Act 2006

  • Has the applicant, or any person who will have control or management of the establishment, ever had a licence refused, revoked or cancelled

DATA PROTECTION

  • For information about how and why we may process your personal data protection rights or how to contact our data protection officer, please view our Privacy Notice.
    http://www.charnwood.gov.uk/pages/privacynotice

  • .

Premises

  • Address of premises to be licenced

  • Telephone Number

  • E-mail Address

  • Have they obtained the appropriate planning permission for this business use

  • Is there a Head Office Address

  • Head Office Address

  • Telephone Number

  • E-mail Address

Additional Details

VETS

  • Name of usual veterinary surgeon

  • Name of veterinary practice

  • Address

  • Telephone number

  • E-mail Address

EMERGENCY KEY HOLDER

    Details of Emergency Key Holders
  • Name

  • Address

  • Telephone Number

  • Alternative Number

  • E-mail Address

PUBLIC LIABILITY INSURANCE

  • Do they have public liability insurance to cover the business activities

  • What steps are they taking to obtain such insurance

  • Name of the Insurance Company

  • Policy number

  • Period of cover

  • Amount of cover (£m)

UKAS ACCREDITITATION

  • Is the business certified by a UKAS accredited body

  • Further details of the UKAS accreditation

PAYMENT

  • There are two fees associated with this application, the application fee which should have been paid at the time of the application and also then a licence fee which needs to be paid once the decision to grant the licence has been made.

  • Has the application fee been received

  • How much application fee was paid for this application

  • How was the application fee received

  • Receipt Number

  • Has the licence fee been received

  • How much licence fee was paid for this application

  • How much licence fee was paid for this application

  • How was the licence fee received

  • Receipt Number

  • Please can you arrange to pay the licence fee ASAP.

Specific Details

Selling Animals as Pets Activities

  • The following types of selling animals as pets business activities are carried out from this site

  • Do they intend to sell dogs

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell cats

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell rabbits

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell guinea pigs

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell ferrets

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell domestic small rodents

  • Further details on the types of domestic small rodents

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell other non-domestic species (mammals)

  • Further details on the types of domestic small rodents

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell birds

  • Further details on the types of birds

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell reptiles and amphibians

  • Further details on the types of reptiles and amphibians

  • Maximum number to be kept is

  • Details of their accommodation including size

  • Do they intend to sell fish

  • They intend to sell the following type of fish

  • Details of their accommodation including size

Employees / Volunteers

  • Are there any employees that assist with the business of selling animals as pets

  • How many employees are there

  • Are there any volunteers that assist in the business of selling animals as pets

  • Provide details of any volunteers

General Conditions

  • This section details the general licence conditions from Schedule 2 of the Regulations that you need to comply with and the Licensing Officer will indicate for each licence condition the following;
    Yes (Green) - You have complied with this licence condition.
    Yes but review (Amber) - You just need to look at this a little bit further to be considered fully compliant.
    Yes will be (new) (Amber) - this will be in place once the licence is issued.
    No (Red) - you have not complied with this licence condition.
    If Yes, is not selected then the Licensing Officer may also select all or part of the guidance from that particular licence condition for your information and to assist you in complying with the licence condition. Further text may also be provided.

1.0 Licence Display

  • 1.1 A copy of the licence must be clearly and prominently displayed on any premises used for the licensable activity.

  • 1.2 The name of the licence holder followed by the number of the licence holder’s licence must be clearly and prominently displayed on any website used in respect of the licensable activity.

2.0 Records

  • 2.1 The licence holder must ensure that at any time all the records that the licence holder is required to keep as a condition of the licence are available for inspection by an inspector in a visible and legible form or, where any such records are stored in electronic form, in a form from which they can readily be produced in a visible and legible form.

  • 2.2 The licence holder must keep all such records for at least three years beginning with the date on which the record was created.

  • Electronic records must be backed up.

3.0 Use, number and type of animals

  • 3.1 No animals or types of animal other than those animals and types of animal specified in the licence may be used in relation to the relevant licensable activity.

  • No types of animals other than those specified in the licence, can be stocked for the purposes of the activity.

  • For reptiles, amphibians, fish, and rodent groups this can be groups of species (e.g. tropical fish, snakes, newts, hamsters, gerbils).

  • 3.2 The number of animals kept for the activity at any time must not exceed the maximum that is reasonable taking into account the facilities and staffing on any premises used for the licensable activity.

  • The licence conditions must state the numbers for each species or species group that may be kept on the premises, with the exception of fish. Undeclared breach of these numbers can invalidate the licence, especially if not reflected in increased staffing levels.

  • With the exception of fish, the stocking densities for each taxa group are given in the relevant annexes and must be adhered to.

4.0 Staffing

  • 4.1 Sufficient numbers of people who are `competent for the purpose must be available to provide a level of care that ensures that the welfare needs of all the animals are met.

  • No animal must be stocked or sold unless the staff or at least one member of staff on site during opening hours is familiar with the care and welfare of the animals stocked and has a recognised qualification and/or can demonstrate suitable experience/ training.

  • Where there is evidence that the welfare needs of the animals are not being met, the inspector must consider if the staffing levels are appropriate. Staffing levels can in part be influenced by site-specific and automated processes.

  • Licence holders keeping venomous species hazardous to human health must ensure that sufficient staff are trained or have experience in the species management.

  • Written instructions must be provided for staff on the provision of health care and the procedures to be followed in the event of an incident involving any venomous animal and a visitor or staff member.

  • 4.2 The licence holder or a designated manager and any staff employed to care for the animals must have competence to identify the normal behaviour of the species for which they are caring and to recognise signs of, and take appropriate measures to mitigate or prevent, pain, suffering, injury, disease or abnormal behaviour.

  • Animals must be handled/cared for by staff who possess the appropriate ability, knowledge and professional competence. This can be demonstrated by holding or being registered for an OFQUAL regulated Level 2 qualification that is appropriate to the species kept, by having undertaken relevant industry recognised training or an in-store training programme or based on experience.

  • Individuals undertaking an OFQUAL regulated qualification must have suitably progressed in 12 months and have completed the qualification within two years.

  • 4.3 The licence holder must provide and ensure the implementation of a written training policy for all staff.

  • The training policy must be reviewed and updated on an annual basis and must include: o annual appraisal; o planned continued professional development; o recognition of knowledge gaps; o Use of online courses and literature; o If no staff are employed the licence holder must demonstrate their own knowledge development.

  • It will be applicable to any members of staff and can be shown by engagement with courses, written or online learning, keeping up to date with any research or developments for specific species and the documentation of the annual appraisal.

  • Evidence of staff attendance or completion of the training must be provided.

5.0 Suitable Environment

  • 5.1 All areas, equipment and appliances to which the animals have access must present minimal risks of injury, illness and escape. They must be constructed in materials that are robust, safe and durable, in a good state of repair and well maintained.

  • Housing must be secure in order to prevent injuries and reduce risk of disease transmission. Structural integrity must be maintained and housing designed to ensure dry, easily cleansed surfaces (including junctions) for non-aquatic species. Materials must be non-toxic and constructed of non-porous materials, or be appropriately treated.

  • Accommodation must be regularly inspected for damage and potential injury or escape points. Damaged accommodation must be repaired or replaced immediately.

  • Hazards must be minimised in accommodation. There must be no projections or rough edges liable to cause injury. No electrical cables must be within reach of any animal that could chew or damage them.

  • All licence holders must be able to demonstrate that both environmental and biosecurity, including zoonotic disease, risks have been considered in the enclosure selection and use.

  • Drainage in enclosures, activity areas, passageways and preparation areas must be adequate to reduce the risk of pathogens associated with standing water.

  • 5.2 Animals must be kept at all times in an environment suitable to their species and condition (including health status and age) with respect to—

  • (a) their behavioural needs,

  • Accommodation must provide shelter from adverse environmental conditions and predators.

  • Enclosure size must be appropriate to the species, adjusted according to its size as the animal grows and where animals are kept communally any change in group dynamics may require separation or larger enclosures.

  • Whilst offered for sale the business is considered a short-term transitional holding facility. Acceptable enclosure sizes may be smaller than those intended for long term husbandry, and are outlined for each taxonomic group within the individual schedules with regard to specific stocking densities. The transitional period is considered to be no more than three months from the date of arrival. If retained for longer or permanently then the animal must be moved to an enclosure size representing current best practice for the individual species comparable with that expected to be found with the final purchaser, at a minimum this must be equivalent, or preferably larger, to those described in the higher standard minimum enclosure size for each species where specified.

  • For businesses selling animals exclusively to other businesses, there are no current agreed standards for cage sizes and stocking densities, and so businesses must provide evidence to demonstrate that welfare is being met with reference to the guidance in the rest of this document. Set standards will be developed. This does not apply to businesses selling dogs and cats which must follow the accommodation sizes stipulated in the guidance.

  • Animals must be able to move around freely climb, fly, swim or jump where appropriate, and exhibit normal behaviour in their environment.

  • Where appropriate, animals must have separate areas for hiding, sleeping, toileting and exercising. Sleeping areas must be dry, draught-free, well ventilated and clean as well as large enough to allow all the animals housed to rest together fully outstretched where appropriate and turn around unimpeded. Any substrate used must be appropriate to the species concerned.

  • (b) its situation, space, air quality, cleanliness and temperature,

  • Licence holders must ensure that environmental conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, ventilation, lighting conditions are carefully controlled at all times, are within the appropriate range for the species housed and monitored as appropriate, with any deviations recorded.

  • Staff must be able to outline the remedial action taken when parameters deviate from the acceptable ranges for the species housed. Over-exposure to direct sunlight and other unintended heat sources must be avoided.

  • Animals held or displayed outdoors must always have access to suitable protection from adverse weather conditions.

  • Animals must not be exposed to draughts.

  • (c) the water quality (where relevant),

  • For species where water quality forms an integral part of life support, or where poor water quality has welfare implications, appropriate water testing and recording must be undertaken. The frequency of such testing must be appropriate to the system, with a minimum of weekly records maintained. Such records must detail any remedial action which has been undertaken to restore acceptable parameters.

  • (d) noise levels,

  • Noise and vibration must be maintained at levels appropriate to species, and enclosures must be situated remotely from sources likely to cause stress or disturbance.

  • (e) light levels,

  • Light must be provided in a suitable natural cycle for the species and where natural light is insufficient, suitable artificial lighting must be used.

  • (f) ventilation.

  • Ventilation must be provided to all interior areas. Ventilation must be appropriate to the species and have no detrimental effect on temperature or humidity.

  • Humidity must be appropriate for the species.

  • 5.3 Staff must ensure that the animals are kept clean and comfortable

  • Where accommodation is on a tiered system, water, food or waste products must not be allowed to contaminate lower levels. In certain systems, such as aquaria or mixed-species aviaries, where isolation is inappropriate, waste must be adequately managed to prevent contamination of food and water.

  • 5.4 Where appropriate for the species, a toileting area and opportunities for toileting must be provided.

  • 5.5 Procedures must be in place to ensure accommodation and any equipment within it is cleaned as often as necessary and good hygiene standards are maintained. The accommodation must be capable of being thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

  • Accommodation must be cleaned and disinfected with products effective against likely pathogens. At normal usage levels, disinfectants must be non-toxic to the species housed, used at an appropriate dilution factor and as per the manufacturer’s instructions, with appropriate timed separation between disinfection and (re)introduction of livestock observed.

  • Soiled bedding must be removed in a timely fashion and immediately replaced.

  • Empty enclosures must be fully cleaned, disinfected and allowed to dry when vacated and before new stock arrives. Substrate must be replaced as appropriate, and enclosure fixtures and fittings must be adequately disinfected.

  • Enclosures must be spot-cleaned at least daily and as necessary, unless this has negative effects on the welfare of the animals.

  • 5.6 The animals must be transported and handled in a manner (including for example in relation to housing, temperature, ventilation and frequency) that protects them from pain, suffering, injury and disease.

  • Any animals received or consigned must be transported according to the regulations laid down in current legislation.

  • Predators and prey must not be kept within sight, sound or smell during transport

  • Vehicles must be cleaned and disinfected after each collection/delivery.

  • Animals must be transported in suitable containers and must not be mixed with different species or unfamiliar animals. Where a number of animals are mixed in the same container then it must be of an appropriate size to prevent overcrowding.

  • Animals must not be left in vehicles for unreasonable periods and must never be left unattended in a car or other vehicle when the temperature may pose a risk to the animal.

  • Injured, diseased or ill animals must not be transported unless being taken to a veterinarian, quarantine or isolation facility. In these situations, there must be barriers between containers to reduce the transmission of disease, where applicable, and the vehicle and equipment must be appropriately disinfected following transportation.

  • 5.7 All the animals must be easily accessible to staff and for inspection. There must be sufficient light for the staff to work effectively and observe the animals.

  • In order to avoid exposure to direct sunlight, inappropriate heat levels or stressful stimuli, animals must not be placed on display in windows on external aspects.

  • Enclosures must allow for daily visual inspection, with minimal disturbance to the animal, unless increased frequency is required for the species (see relevant Schedules).

  • Consideration must be given to the specific requirements of nocturnal species.

  • 5.8 All resources must be provided in a way (for example as regards. frequency, location and access points) that minimises competitive behaviour or the dominance of individual animals.

  • Resources include, but are not limited to: food, water, enrichment items and resting/sleeping areas.

  • There must be sufficient resources for each individual animal in any shared enclosure to minimise dominance, and where this is identified, additional resources must be provided or dominant animals removed where appropriate.

  • Feeding and / or play must be separate or supervised where necessary.

  • Staff must be trained to recognise signs of group disruption (e.g. competition and aggression), which could compromise animal welfare.

  • 5.9 The animals must not be left unattended in any situation or for any period likely to cause them distress.

6.0 Suitable Diet

  • 6.1 The animals must be provided with a suitable diet in terms of quality, quantity and frequency. Any new feeds must be introduced gradually to allow the animals to adjust to them.

  • The quantity, frequency, delivery and type of food must be determined by what is appropriate for the species and the individual’s behavioural and nutritional needs. Staff must have knowledge of the requirements for all the species held for which they are responsible. The purchaser must be advised to continue feeding the diet given by the licence holder initially.

  • Food supplements, including vitamins and minerals, must be provided if necessary at the correct dosage for the individual species and in a form appropriate to ensure adequate supplementation is delivered to the target species.

  • Fresh foods must be kept refrigerated where appropriate. Frozen foods intended for use must be stored in an appropriate deep freeze and defrosted thoroughly to room temperature before use.

  • Live food intended for use must be housed in suitable escape proof containers. Live food, if uneaten in a short period, must be removed where it may pose a risk to the species housed e.g. crickets biting reptiles.

  • The feeding of live vertebrate prey should be carried out only in exceptional circumstances (e.g. non-feeding snake). This must be on an individual animal basis for specified animals only. A written justification must have been completed, be made available to inspectors, and be agreed by senior staff, including veterinary advice, weighing up the welfare of predator and prey. Animals known to only feed on live prey must not be sold to members of the general public, only to specialists or institutions. Live feeding must be observed by a competent staff member and uneaten prey removed in a timely manner. Such feeding must not take place in the presence of the public.

  • 6.2 Feed and (where appropriate) water intake must be monitored, and any problems recorded and addressed.

  • Abnormalities in eating and/or drinking habits must be recorded, reported to the appropriate member of staff and acted upon. Appropriate veterinary advice must be sought if necessary.

  • Significant weight loss or gain must be assessed by a competent person. Where the underlying reason cannot be identified and/or remedial measures have been unsuccessful, the animal must be assessed by a veterinarian. If it is housed as part of a social group, the establishment must have the ability to isolate an individual to ascertain whether it is eating or not.

  • For small mammals, guinea pigs, rabbits and birds, if there is no improvement in food intake within 12 hours following remedial action by a competent person or the condition of the individual deteriorates a veterinarian must be consulted without delay.

  • 6.3 Feed and drinking water provided to the animals must be unspoilt and free from contamination.

  • Spoilt perishable food stuffs must be removed as soon as noted and within 24 hours of being supplied.

  • Refrigeration facilities for feed storage must be provided. High risk feeds (such as cooked or raw meat and fish, or dairy products) and the remains of opened tins or pouches must be stored in covered, non-metal, leak proof containers in the fridge.

  • 6.4 Feed and drinking receptacles must be capable of being cleaned and disinfected, or disposable.

  • Water and food bowls must be checked daily, cleaned daily as appropriate and disinfected at least weekly.

  • 6.5 Constant access to fresh, clean drinking water must be provided in a suitable receptacle for the species that requires it.

  • Fresh clean water must be available at all times, except for those species where it may be harmful and during the transitional period when water supplies are being changed e.g. when water bottles are removed for filling.

  • Water bottles must be free flowing and free from leakages and blockages.

  • Water must be located away from the sleeping area to help prevent this becoming damp or waterlogged if the bottle leaks.

  • Raptors should be provided daily with fresh clean water in a bath but it should be withdrawn during freezing weather, where they are kept outdoors, to avoid health problems.

  • 6.6 Where feed is prepared on the premises used for the licensable activity, there must be hygienic facilities for its preparation, including a working surface, hot and cold running water and storage.

  • Staff must observe strict standards of personal hygiene and should conform to good hygiene practice in the preparation of food, having due regard to the risk of cross contamination between equipment, utensils and surfaces. There must be appropriate disinfectants available to clean the food preparation area immediately following its use.

  • Food must be protected against dampness, deterioration, mould or from contamination by insects, birds, vermin or other pests.

  • The food preparation area must be kept clean and vermin free.

  • Human and animal food preparation must not take place in shared preparation areas at the same time or using shared utensils.

  • Where fresh food is used there must be refrigeration facilities.

  • Staff must not use receptacles for food and drink for any other purposes.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

  • 7.1 Active and effective environmental enrichment must be provided to the animals in inside and any outside environments.

  • Environmental enrichment accessories which stimulate natural behaviour must be provided as appropriate to the species maintained. These must not have the potential to cause injury and must be replaced if damaged.

  • As appropriate to the species, enrichment devices must be changed on a regular basis to introduce novelty and maintain interest. When adding new enrichment devices, staff must ensure that the animal is closely monitored for signs of distress.

  • Accessories must be disposable or be disinfected between animals.

  • 7.2 For species whose welfare depends partly on exercise, opportunities to exercise which benefit the animals’ physical and mental health must be provided, unless advice from a veterinarian suggests otherwise.

  • Animals must be able to exhibit normal behaviour patterns and this may require the provision of additional suitable space for exercise.

  • All animals must have daily exercise, as appropriate for species, age, ability and physical capability. Animals convalescing or within a resting or quarantine period should be allowed rest and exercise may be provided after this.

  • Animals which cannot be exercised for veterinary reasons must be provided with additional enrichment.

  • 7.3 The animals’ behaviour and any changes of behaviour must be monitored. Advice must be sought, as appropriate and without delay, from a veterinarian or, in the case of fish, any person competent to give such advice if adverse or abnormal behaviour is detected.

  • 7.4 Where used, training methods or equipment must not cause pain, suffering or injury.

  • Training must be based on the principles of positive reinforcement (i.e. reward desired behaviour and ignore unwanted behaviour).

  • 7.5 All immature animals must be given suitable and adequate opportunities to— (a) learn how to interact with people, their own species and other animals where such interaction benefits their welfare, and (b) become habituated to noises, objects and activities in their environment.

  • Where there is demonstrable welfare benefit, young animals must be adequately and appropriately socialised and habituated, by appropriately knowledgeable staff, to prevent fear behaviour towards, for example, people, animals, situations and environments they are likely to encounter in their adult lives.

8.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

  • 8.1 All people responsible for the care of the animals must be competent in the appropriate handling of each animal to protect it from pain, suffering, injury or disease.

  • Where a customer or client is handling an animal, a competent member of staff must ensure the interaction is appropriate and is stopped if the animal shows sign of fear, suffering or fatigue.

  • Animals which may be aggressive must only be handled by, or in the presence of, competent staff.

  • Customers, especially children, handling animals prior to purchase must be supervised and offered facilities (and encouraged) to clean their hands before and afterwards (e.g. hand sanitisers). Where gross faecal or urinary contamination is present customers must be offered facilities to wash their hands.

  • 8.2 The animals must be kept separately or in suitable compatible social groups appropriate to the species and individual animals. No animals from a social species may be isolated or separated from others of their species for any longer than is necessary.

  • Where appropriate, all animals must be housed in social groups of suitable size.

  • Group-housed animals must be monitored for any signs of group disruption and remedial action taken, and documented without delay.

  • Acceptable reasons for isolation/separation of social species if remedial action has not been successful are demonstrable risk of disease, injury or danger/stress.

  • Where appropriate for the species, to help avoid unwanted litters, all animals must be sexed immediately on arrival to the premises and housed in single sex groups unless this would compromise welfare e.g. a litter of puppies.

  • 8.3 The animals must have at least daily opportunities to interact with people where such interaction benefits their welfare.

  • Animals must never be forced to interact with people, and must have a facility to avoid people for example, have access to a hiding place, unless this would adversely impact their welfare. Interaction includes handling and non-physical interactions with people.

9.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

  • 9.1 Written procedures must—(a) be in place and implemented covering—

  • (i) feeding regimes,

  • (ii) cleaning regimes,

  • (iii) transportation,

  • (iv) the prevention of, and control of the spread of, disease,

  • (v) monitoring and ensuring the health and welfare of all the animals,

  • (vi) the death or escape of an animal (including the storage of carcasses);

  • (b) be in place covering the care of the animals following the suspension or revocation of the licence or during and following an emergency.

  • Written procedures should be proportional to the size, and reflect the complexity, of the business. The written procedures must be made available to the inspectors and all people responsible for the care of the animals must be made fully aware of these procedures.

  • The procedures must demonstrate how the conditions outlined in this guidance are met.

  • 9.2 All people responsible for the care of the animals must be made fully aware of these procedures.

  • 9.3 Appropriate isolation, in self-contained facilities, must be available for the care of sick, injured or potentially infectious animals.

  • Provision must be made for the isolation of sick/injured/infectious animals and those that might reasonably expected to be carrying serious infectious diseases.

  • Adequate isolation facilities may be on site or at another location, such as a local veterinary practice or through specific changes in management practices demonstrated by written procedures. If the isolation facility is at another location, such as a local veterinary practice a letter must be provided by the practice stating that they are prepared to provide such facilities.

  • Where infectious disease is present in a premises, barrier nursing procedures must be implemented. This includes use of protective clothing and footwear (where applicable) changed between enclosures; separate storage of equipment, including cleaning utensils, and segregation of waste.

  • Isolated animals must be kept in a secure, comfortable location where their condition and needs can be monitored and a record kept of their treatment.

  • Sick animals must not be handled by members of the public.

  • 9.4 All reasonable precautions must be taken to prevent and control the spread among animals and people of infectious diseases and parasites.

  • Signage, care information and/or staff must inform customers about the risks of infectious disease transmission.

  • An animal which is suffering from, or could reasonably be suspected of having come into contact with any other animal suffering from any infectious or contagious disease or which is clinically infested with parasites, must not brought into or kept on the premises unless effectively isolated.

  • 9.5 All excreta and soiled bedding for disposal must be stored and disposed of in a hygienic manner and in accordance with any relevant legislation.

  • Excreta and soiled bedding must be removed from the premises on a regular basis, at least weekly, disposed of to the satisfaction of the appropriate local authority, and in accordance with current regulations and good waste management practice.

  • All excreta and soiled bedding must be stored away from where food and animals are kept.

  • 9.6 Sick or injured animals must receive prompt attention from a veterinarian or, in the case of fish, an appropriately competent person and the advice of that veterinarian or, in the case of fish, that competent person must be followed.

  • Any sick or injured animal must receive appropriate care and treatment without delay. These must only be treated by appropriately competent staff or veterinarians. “Care and treatment” may include euthanasia.

  • Where any animal shows any sign of disease, injury or illness it must be kept separate from the other animals and veterinary advice, or that of a competent person’s in the case of fish, must be sought within 24 hours, unless otherwise stated in taxa specific Schedules. Any instructions for its treatment must be strictly followed.

  • 9.7 Where necessary, animals must receive preventative treatment by an appropriately competent person.

  • 9.8 The licence holder must register with a veterinarian with an appropriate level of experience in the health and welfare requirements of any animals specified in the licence and the contact details of that veterinarian must be readily available to all staff on the premises used for the licensable activity.

  • The name, address and telephone contact number, including out of hours provision, of the veterinary practice used by the establishment must be easily available to all staff members.

  • Where there is a lack of local veterinary expertise with regard to the taxa being sold then a competent secondary veterinary practice must provide support to the primary practice as required.

  • 9.9 Prescribed medicines must be stored safely and securely to safeguard against unauthorised access, at the correct temperature, and used in accordance with the instructions of the veterinarian

  • Any prescribed medication given must be prescribed for the individual animal by a veterinarian, and each instance of use must be recorded.

  • 9.10 Medicines other than prescribed medicines must be stored, used and disposed of in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturer or veterinarian.

  • 9.11 Cleaning products must be suitable, safe and effective against pathogens that pose a risk to the animals. They must be used, stored and disposed of in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and used in a way which prevents distress or suffering of the animals.

  • The compatibility of different bactericides, fungicides and virucides (if used together and/or with a detergent) must be considered.

  • Manufacturers’ recommended guidelines for use, correct dilutions and contact time for use in cleaning and disinfection procedures must be followed.

  • Any equipment that has been used on an infectious or suspected infectious animal must be cleaned and disinfected after use.

  • 9.12 No person may euthanase an animal except a veterinarian or a person who has been authorised by a veterinarian as competent for such purpose or—(a) in the case of fish, a person who is competent for such purpose;(b) in the case of horses, a person who is competent, and who holds a licence or certificate, for such purpose.

  • Where euthanasia is not carried out by, or under the direct supervision of, a veterinarian the rationale for why the animal was euthanased, the method deployed and the member of staff carrying out the euthanasia must be recorded and records made available at subsequent inspections. This does not apply to fish.

  • Where a licence holder is breeding or purchasing live vertebrate animals that are to be euthanased for the purpose of feeding to other stock held on the premises the method of euthanasia must be assessed by a veterinarian and signed off as to the satisfaction of the veterinarian that the method is humane and effective, and continues to be so. The method of euthanasia must be safe and humane for both the culled animal and the animal being fed.

  • Under no circumstances may an animal be euthanased other than in a humane and effective manner. In case of doubt as to humane and effective methods, veterinary advice must be sought.

  • 9.13 All animals must be checked at least once daily and more regularly as necessary to check for any signs of pain, suffering, injury, disease or abnormal behaviour. Vulnerable animals must be checked more frequently. Any signs of pain, suffering, injury, disease or abnormal behaviour must be recorded and the advice and further advice (if necessary) of a veterinarian (or in the case of fish, of an appropriately competent person) must be sought and followed.

  • Checks must not cause unnecessary stress or disturbance. Visual checks are acceptable.

  • A system of recording abnormalities must be maintained.

  • Where necessary for specific species, vulnerable animals, such as young, whelping, sick or injured animals, must be checked more frequently than the minimum once daily.

10.0 Emergencies

  • 10.1 A written emergency plan, acceptable to the local authority, must be in place, known and available to all staff on the premises used for the licensable activity, and followed where necessary to ensure appropriate steps are taken to protect all the people and animals on the premises in case of fire or in case of breakdowns for essential heating, ventilation and aeration or filtration systems or other emergencies

  • Staff must be aware of the emergency procedures and a copy must be displayed for staff to refer to as and when needed.

  • Suitable emergency response plans must cover arrangements for emergency evacuation, housing, husbandry and loss of power/water. Emergency evacuation must detail how and by what means animals, staff and the public should evacuate the establishment, identify designated fire assembly points, designated holding areas for animals and which animals can and cannot be evacuated (such as aquaria and ponds).

  • Consideration must be given to using systems which would allow timely removal of the animals in the case of emergency. Where emergencies are potentially life threatening, humans must not be put at risk attempting to remove animals.

  • Emergency plans must also include consideration of business continuity management including steps to be taken in the case of life support failure, power cut or other utility failures that will have direct impacts on animal welfare.

  • Emergency drills must be regularly practised and practices recorded with any failings noted and addressed in the procedures. Drills must be undertaken at least annually, or as determined by fire risk assessments.

  • All staff must undergo regular training and records must be kept of such training. Sufficient nominated staff must be properly trained on the use of equipment provided.

  • The emergency plan must include a list of any listed species on the current Schedule of the Dangerous Wild Animals Act held on site, where applicable, and the specific action plan for their safe removal and immediate appropriate rehoming in the case of emergency.

  • Entrances and fire exits must be clear of obstructions at all times.

  • All electrical installations must be installed by appropriately qualified persons and maintained in a safe condition; and sited such that they do not present a risk. There must be an effective contingency plan for essential heating, ventilation and aeration/ filtration systems, as appropriate.

  • All equipment must be maintained in a good state of repair and serviced according to manufacturer’s guidelines. Suitable fire fighting, prevention and detection equipment must be provided, maintained, regularly serviced and sited as advised by the local fire protection/prevention officer and approved by the local authority.

  • 10.2 The plan must include details of the emergency measures to be taken for the extrication of the animals should the premises become uninhabitable and an emergency telephone list that includes the fire service and police.

  • 10.3 External doors and gates must be lockable.

  • 10.4 A designated key holder with access to all animal areas must at all times be within reasonable travel distance of the premises and available to attend in an emergency.

  • A reasonable distance would, in normal conditions, be interpreted as no more than 30 minutes travelling time.

  • When the licensed premises are sited within other premises, the licensee or key holders must have access at all times to the premises containing the animals.

Specific Conditions - Selling Animals as Pets

  • This section details the SPECIFIC licence conditions from Schedule 3 of the Regulations that you need to comply with and the Licensing Officer will indicate for each licence condition the following;
    Yes (Green) - You have complied with this licence condition.
    Yes but review (Amber) - You just need to look at this a little bit further to be considered fully compliant.
    Yes will be (new) (Amber) - this will be in place once the licence is issued.
    No (Red) - you have not complied with this licence condition.
    If Yes, is not selected then the Licensing Officer may also select all or part of the guidance from that particular licence condition for your information and to assist you in complying with the licence condition. Further text may also be provided.

2.0 Records and advertisements

  • 2.1 A register must be maintained for all the animals or, in the case of fish, all the groups of fish, on the premises. The register where they are kept for sale which must include —

  • (a) the full name of the supplier of the animal,

  • (b) the animal’s sex (where known),

  • (c) (except in the case of fish) the animal’s age (where known),

  • (d) details of any veterinary treatment (where known),

  • (e) the date of birth of the animal or, if the animal was acquired by the licence holder, the date of its acquisition,

  • (g) the date of the animal's death (if applicable)

  • The register can be a stand-alone dedicated document or can be collated invoices and proof of sales receipts that allows an accurate representation of acquisitions and sales. This can be a centralised system but must be accessible in store. Deaths can be recorded as part of daily observational records or as a standalone document. Actions taken following any unusual mortality must also be recorded. For fish, deaths should be recorded when mortality exceeds 5% of animals on site, over a 24 hour period. This register is confidential and must be reviewed on site and not routinely removed.

  • The register must contain sufficient detail as to allow identification of the source (i.e. the supplier) of the animals.

  • The register must be available for inspection by the appropriate authority.

  • 2.2 Where an animal is undergoing any medical treatment— <br>a) this fact must be clearly indicated— <br>(i) in writing next to it, or <br>(ii) (where appropriate) by labelling it accordingly, and <br>(b) it must not be sold

  • Any animal with an abnormality which would materially affect its quality of life must not be offered for sale. In instances were animals are being treated and it is in their best welfare interests to remain in their enclosure they can remain on display but must be clearly marked as under treatment.

  • When in doubt, veterinary advice must be sought.

  • Where treatment is administered as part of any preventative medicine protocols and there is no known disease or contact with known diseased animals then this is not considered an animal under treatment e.g. worming treatment as part of new acquisition admission policies.

  • 2.3 Any advertisement for the sale of an animal must—(a) include the number of the licence holder’s licence, (b) specify the local authority that issued the licence, (c) include a recognisable photograph of the animal being advertised,(d) (except in the case of fish) display the age of the animal being advertised, (e) state the country of residence of the animal from which it is being sold, and (f) state the country of origin of the animal.

  • An advert refers to those used to advertise an animal to the public. It does not include internal sales in store and business to business sales.

  • For dogs and cats a specific photograph must be used. For other species, a stock photograph of the species is considered acceptable.

  • The country of origin must refer to the country of birth of the specific animal. Where this is not known this can be the country of export of the specific animal.

3.0 Prospective Sales: pet care and advice

  • 3.1 The licence holder and all staff must ensure that any equipment and accessories being sold with an animal are suitable for the animal.

  • Any advice with regards to accommodation size must exceed the minimum sizes outlined in this document. Advice on enclosure size should represent or exceed current higher standards as listed in the species specific schedules below when an animal is sold as a business to public sale.

  • Staff must be able to provide the correct advice regarding the suitability of items for sale on the premises.

  • 3.2 The licence holder and all staff must ensure that the prospective owner is provided with information on the appropriate care of the animal including in relation to—<br>(a) feeding, <br>(b) housing, <br>(c) handling,<br>(d) husbandry, <br>(e) the life expectancy of its species <br>(f) the provision of suitable accessories, and <br>(g) veterinary care.

  • Pet care leaflets or other similar written or electronic instructions, given at the point of sale to the general public, in addition to outlining the Five Welfare Needs, must encourage responsible pet ownership and ideally make reference to an owner’s obligations as per the Animal Welfare Act (2006). Staff have the right to refuse a sale if they are concerned and/or are not satisfied to the best of their knowledge that the prospective owner is able to meet that animal’s welfare needs.

  • Advice must be given on microchipping.

  • DOGS - This must include advice on updating microchip registration, vaccinations, socialisation and neutering. A transitional feeding schedule must also be provided showing the day by day ratio if changing puppies on to a different food. A puppy contract and puppy information pack must be provided at the point of sale.

  • CATS - This must include advice on, vaccinations, socialisation and neutering. A transitional feeding schedule must also be provided showing the day by day ratio if changing kittens on to a different food.

  • RABBITS - Where sold singly, the licence holder and/or staff must ask if the purchaser owns a suitable conspecific and if not, encourage them to purchase one, or check that they have a care plan in place for a single housed rabbit. This must also include advice on vaccinations and reproductive health care.

  • FERRETS - This must include advice on vaccinations, socialisation and reproductive management.

  • REPTILES - Advice must be given on environmental conditions.

  • 3.3 Appropriate reference materials on the care of all animals for sale must be on display and provided to the prospective owner

  • Pet care leaflets or other similar written or electronic information must be made available to customers free of charge at the time of purchase, in addition to anyoffer to purchase pet care books or leaflets. Information can be in the form of Codes of Practice issued by governments and may also be made available electronically.

  • 3.4 The licence holder and all staff must have been suitably trained to advise prospective owners about the animals being sold.

  • 3.5 The licence holder and sales staff must ensure that the purchaser is informed of the country of origin of the animal and the species, and where known, the age, sex and veterinary record of the animal being sold.

  • This must also include whether the animal was wild caught or captive bred, where known.

4.0 Suitable accommodation

  • 4.1 Animals must be kept in housing which minimises stress from other animals and the public.

  • The design and layout of the premises must allow animals to be able to control their visual access to surroundings and animals in other enclosures. It should also minimise the number of animals that staff disturb when removing any individual animal.

  • Care must be taken to avoid sensory contact between prey and predator species.

  • 4.2 Where members of the public can view or come into contact with the animals, signage must be in place to deter disturbance of the animals.

  • If animals are on public display, signs must be displayed on enclosures to deter members of the public from tapping on glass or poking fingers into cages.

  • Clear signage must be in place at all times outlining health and safety risk to customers and appropriate behaviour around animals on site relevant to the specific species. In addition to signs, other measures may be required, such as limiting access to some sides of animal enclosures.

  • 4.3 Dangerous wild animals (if any) must be kept in enclosures that are secure and lockable and appropriate for the species

  • When considering species listed on the Dangerous Wild Animal Act (DWAA) Schedule, licence holders must be able to demonstrate that the safety of staff and the general public has been considered in the design of the enclosures, lay out of the premises where the animals are kept, and in the design of any safety barriers that may be present. Design must also demonstrate that prevention of escape has been considered.

  • Licence holders selling animals on the Schedule to the DWAA must inform the purchaser that they require a licence under the DWAA and also inform the issuing authority of the details of the purchase.

  • Whilst pet shops are exempt from the DWAA, consideration must be given to complying with any special requirement(s) specified in the DWAA for the safe accommodation and care of any DWAA listed animal.

5.0 Purchase and sale of animals

  • 5.1 The purchase, or sale, by or on behalf of the licence holder of any of the following is prohibited—<br>(a) unweaned mammals;<br>(b) mammals weaned at an age at which they should not have been weaned;<br>(c) non-mammals that are incapable of feeding themselves;<br>(d) puppies, cats, ferrets or rabbits, aged under 8 weeks.

  • Dogs, cats and ferrets must remain with their mother for the first eight weeks of life unless the mother dies or there is a health risk to the offspring from remaining with her. Where necessary, a veterinarian and/or certified clinical animal behaviourist may certify that it is in the best interests of the animal to be removed earlier.

  • 5.2 The sale of a dog must be completed in the presence of the purchaser on the premises.

6.0 Protection from pain, suffering, injury and disease

  • 6.1 All animals for sale must be in good health

  • Animals must be allowed to acclimatise before being offered for sale. Where animals are obtained for sale to a specific client it may be acceptable for the animal to be sold immediately.

  • Suitable acclimatisation periods;

  • Rabbits 2-3 days;

  • Guinea pigs 2-3 days;

  • Chinchilla 2-3 days;

  • Small mammals 1-2 days;

  • Birds - Feeding and behaving normally for the species

  • Reptiles and amphibians - Feeding and behaving normally for the species

  • Fish - Feeding and behaving normally for the species

  • 6.2 Any animal with a condition which is likely to affect materially its quality of life must not be moved, transferred or offered for sale but may be moved to an isolation facility or veterinary care facility if required until the animal has recovered

  • 6.3 When arranging for the receipt of animals, the licence holder must make reasonable efforts to ensure that they will be transported in a suitable manner.

  • 6.4 Animals must be transported or handed to purchasers in suitable containers for the species and expected duration of the journey

Part C – Dogs

  • Do they intend to sell dogs as part of their Animal Activity Licence?

  • The following specific conditions apply to selling dogs;

4.0 Staffing

  • There must be adequate staffing to feed and socialise puppies every 4-5 hours and a minimum of 4 times over a 16-hour period.

  • Dogs must not be left for long periods without being assessed. Dogs must be checked every 4 hours during the working day and at least once during the overnight period and outside of normal working hours.

5.0 Suitable Environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • Partitions between kennels and individual exercise areas must be of solid construction sufficiently high to prevent nose-nose contact.

  • Kennel doors must be strong enough to resist impact chewing and scratching and must be capable of being effectively secured.

  • Units and exercise areas must open onto secure corridors or other secure areas. These corridors must not be used as an exercise area. All windows must be escape proof.

  • Timber must be of good quality, well-kept and any damaged areas sealed or over clad. Wood must be smooth and treated and properly maintained to render it impervious.

  • Floors must have a non-slip, solid surface.

  • Large apertures to unlock a door must be avoided. Gaps or apertures must be small enough to prevent a dog’s head passing through, or entrapment of any limb or body parts. To protect against entrapment any such gaps must prevent the passage of a 50mm sphere, or smaller if appropriate.

  • All wire mesh/fencing must be strong and rigid and kept in good repair to provide an escape and dig proof structure. Where metal bars and/or mesh and/or frames are used, they must be of suitable gauge (minimum 2mm diameter, approximately British Standard 14 gauge) with spacing adequate to prevent dogs escaping or becoming entrapped.

  • Door openings must be constructed such that the passage of water/waste is not impeded, or allowed to gather due to inaccessibility.

  • Drainage must be effective to ensure there is no standing or pooling of liquids. A minimum gradient of 1:80 is advised to allow water to run off. Waste water must not run off into adjacent pens/dog units. Drainage channels must be provided so that urine is not allowed to pass over walk areas in corridors and communal access areas. There must be no access to the drainage channels by the dogs housed in the dog units.

  • Any drain covers in areas where dogs have access must be designed and located to prevent toes/claws from being caught.

  • Each unit must have minimum headroom height of 2.0m and be designed to allow staff to access dogs and clean all parts of the unit safely. Where this is not feasible there must be a documented procedure in place to demonstrate the safety of staff.

Environmental conditions including sizes

  • Dogs must be monitored to check if they are too hot or too cold. If an individual dog is showing signs of heat or cold intolerance steps must be taken to ensure the welfare of the dog.

  • A dog must be able to remove itself from a direct source of heat.

  • Dogs, particularly puppies, may be adversely affected by the sound of other barking dogs. Dogs under one year of age must be located in the quietest part of the establishment.

  • The kennel area must be large enough to allow for separate sleeping and activity areas. The kennel must allow each dog to be able to walk, turn around and wag its tail without touching the sides of the kennel. The dogs must have sufficient room to play, stand on their hind limbs and to lie down without touching another individual. The kennel size required will increase in relation to the size and number of dogs housed at any one time. The length and width must be sufficient to allow all the dogs to lie outstretched without their noses or tails touching the walls or other individuals.

  • Dogs must have free access to the activity area at all times. In certain circumstances, it is permissible to have separate activity areas to sleeping areas but in such cases dogs must be given access to the activity area at regular intervals, at least four times a day. Any separate activity area must be fully cleaned and disinfected between use by different groups of dogs.

  • Where adult dogs are kept, an outdoor exercise area must be available for toileting and exercise. It must be secure and escape proof to allow off lead activity.

  • Puppies must be housed in litter groups but have the ability to move away from litter mates.

  • Dogs kept in a domestic premises must have free access in at least one room, providing the size of this room meets the minimum enclosure sizes for dog.

  • The minimum kennel sizes are listed in table C-01. Bitches with litters must be provided with double the space allowance. As puppies grow the space available to them must be increased accordingly.

  • TABLE C-01 MINIMUM KENNEL SIZE FOR DOGS

    C01.png

Bedding and substrate

  • Beds and bedding must be provided and be suitable to allow dogs to be comfortable. A dog bed must be of a durable construction, situated away from draughts, and be a suitable size for the breed of dogs kept. It must be large enough for each dog to be able to lie flat on its side.

  • Bedding mist be kept clean, dry and parasite free. It must be cleaned and disinfected between new dogs.

  • Bedding must be capable of being easily cleaned and disinfected, or disposable, and all bedding material in use must be clean, non-irritant and dry. Any bedding must be soft and absorbent.

  • There must be some part of the sleeping area maintained at a minimum temperature relevant to the breed/type of dog. For most this is likely to be between 15℃ and 26℃ (this may require consideration for certain breeds, e.g. huskies).

Cleaning

  • Each occupied kennel must be cleaned daily at a minimum.

  • Dogs must be removed from the area whilst it is being cleaned.

  • All dogs kept must benefit from adequate routine grooming and other health regimes as needed e.g. cleaning of eyes or keeping long fur from matting.

Toileting

  • Dogs must have regular opportunities for toileting away from their sleeping area.

  • Toileting area must be separate from the bedding area and puppy pads or similar material must be provided with the quantity determined by the number of puppies.

  • Faeces must be removed from the kennel units as often as necessary and a minimum of twice a day.

Cleaning

  • Moveable items must be removed for cleaning and disinfection at least weekly.

  • Each unit must be thoroughly cleaned, disinfected and dried at a change of occupancy. This must be adequate to protect the new occupant from any disease or parasites of its predecessor. If certain diseases have been present, e.g. parvovirus, further actions and precautions are needed and veterinary advice must be sought.

  • All bedding, water and feeding utensils must be changed and disinfected. All fittings must also be thoroughly cleansed and disinfected at that time.

Transporting and handling

  • When being transported, the licence holder must demonstrate that a suitable vehicle is available to transport the dogs. Dogs must be suitably restrained using a dog crate, cage or dog guard. Dog cages and crates must be of adequate size, designed to provide good ventilation and firmly secured out of direct sunlight and away from heating vents.

  • Dogs must never be left unattended in vehicles for unreasonable periods and must never be left in a vehicle where the temperature poses a risk.

  • If transporting dogs by road, sufficient breaks must be offered for water and the chance to go to the toilet

6.0 Suitable diet

Diet

  • Adult dogs must have their own feeding dish.

  • Puppies must be fed as least four times daily at appropriate intervals. The diet must be appropriate for puppies.

  • Adult dogs must be fed at least once daily and in accordance with the individual dog’s needs. Dogs must be fed a complete diet appropriate to their age, breed, activity level and stage in the breeding cycle.

  • If there are concerns about an individual dog’s diet, veterinary advice must be sought.

Monitoring

  • Food and water must be checked four times a day.

  • Weekly records of weight and body condition score (BCS) must be kept to ensure the health of puppies and adult dogs and to allow any issues to be tracked.

  • Monthly records of weight and BCS must be kept to ensure the health of adult dogs and to allow any issues to be tracked.

  • Dogs must not remain inappetent (without appetite)for longer than 24 hours without seeking veterinary advice.

Water

  • Each adult dog must have a non-slip water bowl.

  • Water must be changed or refreshed as often as necessary and a minimum of once per day.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

Enrichment

  • All dogs must receive toys and / or feeding enrichment unless veterinary advice suggests otherwise. Items must be checked daily to ensure they remain safe.

  • A written programme must be available setting out a variety of enrichment both inside and outside including training, grooming, socialisation and play.

Exercise

  • Opportunities to exercise must involve at least two walks per day for adult dogs, which may be on a lead and last for at least 20 minutes. Consideration must be given to life stage, physical and mental health and breed when planning daily exercise. Exercise must also involve opportunities to play and interact with humans.

  • Puppies cannot be walked so will require at least four opportunities, of at least 20 minutes each, to engage in play and human interaction during the day.

  • Dogs must be monitored whilst in outdoor exercise areas.

Behaviour

  • The behaviour of individual dogs must be monitored daily. All staff must be able to identify dogs that are anxious or fearful about contact. Where a dog show signs of being nervous, stressed or fearful, steps must be taken to address this.

  • A daily socialisation and habituation programme must be documented and implemented.

  • Puppies must be habituated to events likely to be encountered. This must include the sights and sounds in households. Introduction to novel sights and sounds must be gradual so that puppies do not show a fearful response such as startling or withdrawal.

  • Puppies must also be introduced to a variety of people including adults of both sexes, children of different ages, and people wearing a variety of clothing styles.

  • Beneficial and positive contact can include grooming, exercise, play, petting and training as appropriate for the individual.

8.0 Animal handling and interactions

Handling

  • Dogs must be protected from over handling by staff or the public as they require time to rest. Handling of dogs by customers must only take place with potential owners as an element of a socialisation programme.

  • Dogs must always be handled humanely and appropriately to suit the requirements of the individual dog and to minimise fear, stress, pain and distress. Dogs must never be punished so that they are frightened or exhibit aversive behaviour.

Puppies

  • Weaned puppies must be housed with littermates.

  • Ideally, single dogs must not be left alone in a kennel, but where they are, special attention must be paid to specific human interaction and additional enrichment. When they are mixed they must be of similar age, temperament and there must be good supervision of mixing.

  • Puppies from separate litters must be responsibly paired or grouped with the correct monitoring in place, including consideration as to whether separation overnight is appropriate.

  • A plan must be in place to provide for additional enrichment and socialisation for any puppies that are held for longer than one month.

9.0 Protection from pain, suffering, injury and disease

New dogs

  • In a domestic environment, there must be the capacity for all newly introduced dogs to be kept away from any litters of puppies or places where the litters go.

Prevention of disease etc.

  • Litters of puppies must not be mixed until they have been on the premises for seven days or have shown no sign of infectious disease for seven days.

Excreta

  • Storage of excreta must be away from areas where animals or food is kept.

Preventative treatment.

  • Dogs must have current vaccinations against canine parvovirus, canine distemper, canine adenovirus/infectious canine hepatitis, leptospirosis when appropriate for their age.

  • Routine and documented treatment must be in place for internal and external parasites (adult dogs and puppies must be wormed and given flea and tick treatment as appropriate).

  • Vaccines used must be licensed by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate for use in the UK.

  • Homoeopathic vaccination is not acceptable.

  • If there is evidence of external parasites (fleas, ticks, lice) the dog must be treated with a product authorised by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate. Treatment must be discussed with the veterinarian before administration.

Euthanasia

  • Dogs must only be euthanased by a veterinarian.

Checking animals

  • Premises must have procedures in place for providing for overnight care and during premises closures.

Part D – Cats

  • Do they intend to sell cats as part of their Animal Activity Licence?

  • The following specific conditions apply to selling dogs;

4.0 Staffing

  • There must be adequate staffing to feed and socialise kittens every 4-5 hours over a 16-hour period.

  • Cats must not be left for long periods without being assessed. Cats must be checked at least once in 8 hours during periods when the premises are closed, every 4 hours during normal opening hours and at least once in the overnight period outside normal opening hours.

5.0 Suitable environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • All windows must be escape and entry proof at all times.

  • Doors must have secure latches or other closing devices.

  • Enclosures must be arranged to ensure separated animals are not in direct contact.

  • Units and exercise areas must open onto secure corridors or other secure areas.

Environmental conditions, including sizes

  • For kittens under 26 weeks, the dimensions in Table D-01 must be used for minimum cage sizes.

  • TABLE D-01 MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR KITTENS UP TO 26 WEEKS OF AGE

    d01.png
  • Cats over 26 weeks must be kept in cattery-style pens, follow the Guidance for Providing Boarding for Cats.

  • Cat units must be large enough to allow for separate sleeping and activity areas.

  • The unit must allow each cat to be able to walk and turn around without touching the sides of the unit. The cats must have sufficient room to play, stand on their hind limbs and to lie down without touching another individual.

  • The unit size required must increase in relation to the size and number of cats housed at any one time. The length and width must be sufficient to allow all the cats to lie outstretched without their noses or tails touching the walls or other individuals.

  • In certain circumstances it is permissible to have separate exercise areas to sleeping areas but in such cases cats must be given access to the exercise area at least four times a day. Any separate exercise area must be fully cleaned and disinfected between use by different litters of cats.

  • Cats must have access to a variety of levels (e.g. shelving) in their runs unless advised differently due to a medical condition (e.g. cage rest). Raised areas must be easily accessible and ramps or steps may need to be used for very young or old cats.

  • Cats kept in a domestic premises may be kept in one room, providing the size of this room meets the minimum enclosure sizes for cats. Litters of kittens or cats from different sources must not be housed in the same room. If queens are already in a social group in the house, their litters may mix.

Bedding and substrate

  • Cats must have a warm, soft, sleeping area, away from their litter tray and food.

  • Bedding must be capable of being easily cleaned, disinfected and all bedding material in use must be clean, non-irritant and dry. Any bedding must be soft and absorbent.

  • All cats must be provided with a bedding area or bench, to allow the animal to lie comfortably.

Temperature

  • For adult cats temperature in the sleeping area must stay between 15℃ and 26℃.

  • Kittens must be provided with additional effective and safe heat sources. Nursing queens must have the opportunity to move away from the kittens and the additional heat source. Kittens without a queen require higher temperatures.

Cleaning

  • Cats must be separated from the area being cleaned e.g. placed in a cat carrier or separate unit.

  • Where required or beneficial to the individual cats, adequate routine grooming and other health regimes must be carried out e.g. cleaning of eyes or keeping long fur from matting.

Toileting

  • Where there are multiple adult cats, there must be multiple litter trays, which must be accessible at all times. A litter of kittens must have two litter trays.

  • Faeces must be removed from the litter tray at least daily. Where there is excessive soiling it must be removed more frequently. A clean tray must be provided when cats are left overnight.

  • Litter trays must be placed as far away as possible from the resting and feeding areas.

  • Storage of excreta must be away from areas where animals or food is kept.

  • Litter trays must be large enough to allow the cat to move around, dig and cover faeces and urine. A suitable absorbent material for litter must be provided and must be deep enough (at least 3cm for adult cats) to absorb the urine and allow the cat to dig and cover.

  • Cleaning

  • Moveable items must be removed for cleaning at least weekly.

  • Litter trays must be completely emptied, cleaned and disinfected at least once a week or more frequently as required.

  • Disinfectants which are toxic to cats must not be used e.g. phenol-based.

Transporting and handling

  • Cats must always be transported in a suitably sized and firmly secured cat carrier which allows an ability to hide and with suitable ventilation.

  • There must be one cat per carrier except for a litter of kittens. Kittens under 8 weeks must be transported with their mother except if she is ill/dead.

6.0 Suitable diet

Diet

  • Cats must be fed a diet appropriate to their age, breed, activity level and stage in the breeding cycle.

  • Kittens less than 12 weeks of age must be fed at least four times daily, at appropriate intervals, with more frequent intervals for hand-reared kittens.

  • Cats must have their own feeding and water dish. These must be separate receptacles.

  • Each queen must have access to food that is not accessible to the kittens.

  • Cats must be fed at least twice per day and in accordance with the individual cat’s

  • needs.

  • Food and water must be placed away from the litter tray and each other, ideally at least 60cm apart.

Monitoring

  • Food and water must be checked four times a day.

  • Weekly records of weight and body condition score must be kept to ensure health of kittens under 6 months and to allow any issues to be tracked.

  • Monthly records of weight and BCS must be kept to ensure the health of adult cats and to allow any issues to be tracked.

  • Cats must not remain inappetent for longer that 24 hours without seeking veterinary advice.

Water

  • Each adult cat must have a non-slip water bowl.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

Enrichment

  • All cats must have the opportunity for predatory behaviour and play specific to the needs of that cat. Kittens must have at least four play sessions a day.

  • There must be environmental enrichment in all cages such as toys, climbing frames and platforms. Toys must be easily cleaned or replaced between litters. Items must be checked daily to ensure they remain safe.

Exercise

  • All cats must have a provision for daily exercise appropriate for breed, age, ability and physical capability.

  • Exercise must involve the opportunity to play and interact with people, taking care to ensure that this contact does not cause the cats, particularly kittens, stress.

Behaviour

  • A daily socialisation and habituation programme must be documented and implemented for kittens less than 12 weeks. Kittens must have positive interactions with a variety of people. They must be gently introduced to handling, grooming, being lifted and touched all over. Kittens must be positively exposed to sights, sounds, tastes, textures and smells that they are likely later to encounter in the environment in which they are going to live.

8.0 Animal handling and interactions

Handling

  • Cats must be protected from over handling by staff or the public as they require time to rest. Handling of cats by the public must only take place with potential purchasers as an element of a socialisation programme.

  • Cats must always be handled humanely and appropriately to suit the requirements of the individual cat and to minimise stress and distress, such as anxiety, fear, frustration and pain. Cats must never be punished so that they are frightened or exhibit aversive behaviour. Scruffing of cats (picking up a cat by the scruff of its neck) must not be done except as an absolute last resort.

Kittens

  • Litters must not be routinely mixed and if several litters are kept in one area then the pen must have solid sides to prevent direct contact or by sneezing with each different litters.

  • Single kittens must receive additional human interaction.

  • Kittens should only ever be mixed when their queens have already mixed e.g. in a domestic house. Litters from different sources must never be mixed.

Interaction with people

  • Cats must have beneficial human contact and interaction e.g. staff on a daily basis.

  • Interaction contact sessions with cats must each last for a minimum of 10 minutes and must occur on three separate, evenly spread, occasions during the day. Kittens must be visited a minimum of 4 times per day with 20 minutes of interaction per litter.

  • A plan must be in place to provide for additional enrichment and socialisation for any kittens that are held for longer than one month.

9.0 Protection from pain, suffering injury and disease

Preventative treatment.

  • Cats must have current vaccinations against feline parvovirus (aka feline infectious enteritis, feline panleukopenia) and against feline respiratory viruses (feline herpesvirus and feline calicivirus) when appropriate for their age.

  • Homoeopathic vaccination is not acceptable.

  • If there is evidence of external parasites the cat must be treated with a product authorised by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate. Treatment must be discussed with the veterinarian before administration.

Part E – Rabbits

  • Do they intend to sell rabbits as part of the Animal Activity Licence

  • The following specific conditions apply to selling rabbits;

5.0 Suitable Environment

  • Slatted, grid or wire mesh floors must not be used in rabbit accommodation.

Environmental conditions, including sizes

  • Enclosures must be large enough for rabbits to be able to stand fully upright on their haunches without their ears touching the roof and lie fully outstretched (without touching the sides of the enclosure or another rabbit).

  • Where rabbits are housed in hutches, provision must be made for regular exercise in a secure area outside of the hutch.

  • Minimum enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table E-01

  • TABLE E-01 MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR RABBITS

    e1.png

Bedding and substrate

  • Rabbits must be provided with a suitable nesting material in sufficient amounts.

  • Suitable nesting materials include good quality dust-free hay.

  • Rabbits must be provided with a suitable litter and substrates in sufficient amounts.

  • Suitable litter materials include dust-free wood shavings, supplemented with hay.

  • Sawdust is not suitable as either nesting or litter materials.

Temperature

  • Ambient temperature should be no lower than 12°C and no higher than 26°C.

  • In very hot weather, cooling procedures must be in place, such as, but not limited to, fans to increase air movement, ice packs or air conditioning.

  • In cold temperatures, extra nesting material must be provided, unless alternative temperature control is provided e.g. heating.

Light

  • An example of a suitable light-dark cycle for rabbits is 12 hours light:12 hours dark.

  • Outdoor rabbits are subject to seasonal light variation.

Transporting and handling

  • Rabbits must be able to sit, lie down and turn around in the carrier.

  • Pregnant does are not to be transported within ten days of their expected birth date unless on veterinary advice. Veterinary advice must also be sought before transporting lactating does and kittens. If nursing does and kittens are to be transported they require additional care including adequate bedding and nesting material

Housing and competition

  • There must be sufficient cover for each rabbit housed within an enclosure and there must be two entrance/exit points to prevent monopolisation.

6.0 Suitable Diet

Diet

  • All rabbits must be fed a suitable diet primarily consisting of a constant supply of ad lib fresh hay. Hay needs to be free from contamination.

  • A small portion of commercially available rabbit foods can be given to supplement the primary diet of hay. Food must be appropriate to the age and breed of the rabbit and manufacturer’s instructions must be followed. Licence holders must ensure that selective feeding is considered when selecting muesli or other similar type foods.

  • If used, leafy greens and treat foods must be given in moderation and in small amounts as appropriate to the individual rabbit.

Monitoring

  • A veterinarian must be consulted if there is no improvement where a rabbit has mild anorexia or reduced appetite within 12 hours of onset or the condition of the individual(s) deteriorates.

  • A veterinarian must be consulted if a rabbit shows signs of constipation or diarrhoea.

Water

  • Water may be provided in a clean gravity fill drinking bottle (which must be of a suitable size for the individual), automatic drinkers, or in bowls. Bowls are not suitable if kittens are present.

  • Any changes to drinking receptacles must be made gradually and drinking monitored to ensure animals are drinking normally.

  • Water must be provided for rabbits in multiple bottles or bowls. During hot weather, both a bottle and a bowl must be provided (unless kittens are present, in which case only bottles are suitable).

10.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

  • Suitable enrichment items include, but are not limited to, tunnels, paper bags filled with hay, willow sticks/balls and branches from non-toxic, untreated fruit trees (e.g. apple).

  • New objects must be introduced carefully and not exchanged daily.

11.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

Handling

  • Rabbits must be protected from over handling by staff or the public. Handling of rabbits by a third party must only take place with potential owners as an element of a socialisation programme.

  • Rabbits must not be placed on their back in positions of tonic immobility, or picked up by the scruff of their neck or ears.

Interactions

  • Rabbits must be correctly sexed.

  • All efforts must be made to ensure rabbits are not housed singly. Where this is unavoidable, special attention must be paid to specific human interaction and they must be provided with extra enrichment. A plan must be in place for all singly housed rabbits.

  • Rabbits must not share accommodation with guinea pigs.

12.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

Disease prevention

  • Advice that rabbits should be vaccinated against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (aka RHD 1 and 2) must be provided with sales.

Checking

  • Rabbits’ front teeth and nails must be checked regularly unless inappropriate at the stage of the breeding cycle, and treated as necessary, to ensure they are not overgrown or misaligned - only a veterinarian may correct overgrown/misaligned teeth. Rabbits must have a pre-mating check and then a check at weaning time.

Part F – Guinea Pigs

  • Do they intend to sell guinea pigs as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following specific conditions apply to selling guinea pigs

5.0 Suitable Environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • Slatted, grid or wire mesh floors must not be used in guinea pig accommodation.

Environmental conditions, including sizes

  • Minimum enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table F-01.

  • TABLE F-01 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZE FOR GUINEA PIGS

    f1.png
  • Accommodation needs to be of sufficient size to allow all the guinea pigs housed to be able to lie fully outstretched (without touching the sides of the enclosure or another guinea pig), run, play, tunnel and stand without touching the roof of the enclosure.

  • Ramps must be no steeper than 45o as guinea pigs are poor climbers.

  • Where guinea pigs are housed in hutches, provision must be made for regular exercise in a secure area outside of the hutch.

  • Guinea pigs must be provided with constant access to places to hide, which may include hay piles, in addition to their sleeping area. At a minimum each hiding place is to be large enough to allow one guinea pig to rest alone.

Bedding and substrate

  • Guinea pigs must be provided with a suitable nesting material in sufficient amounts.

  • Suitable nesting materials include, but are not limited to, good quality dust-free hay and/or shredded paper.

  • Guinea pigs must be provided with a suitable litter in sufficient amounts. Suitable litter materials include dust-free wood shavings, supplemented with hay.

  • Sawdust is not suitable as either nesting or litter materials.

Temperature

  • Extreme temperatures must be avoided, outside of 12 – 26˚C. Sufficient nesting material can help achieve this. In very hot weather, cooling procedures must be in place, such as, but not limited to, fans to increase air movement, ice packs or air conditioners.

Transporting and handling

  • Guinea pigs are only to be transported in suitable carriers and must not be mixed with unfamiliar animals in the same carrier. The carrier must be of an appropriate size so that it is not overcrowded.

Housing and competition

  • There must be sufficient cover for each guinea pig housed within an enclosure and there must be two entrance/exit points to prevent monopolisation.

6.0 Suitable Diet

Diet

  • All guinea pigs must be fed a suitable diet primarily consisting of a constant supply of ad lib fresh hay. Hay needs to be free from contamination.

  • Guinea pigs must have sufficient vitamin C in their diet as they are unable to synthesise this specific vitamin. Therefore, a portion of specific guinea pig food must be given daily or alternatively, a stabilised vitamin C commercially available supplement can be provided. Care must be taken in product selection and suitability and if in doubt the veterinarian must be consulted.

  • Guinea pigs can also be given a portion of washed leafy green vegetables daily.

  • Commercially available guinea pig foods can be given to supplement the primary diet of hay. These must be appropriate to the age and breed of the guinea pig and manufacturer’s instructions must be followed. Staff must ensure that selective feeding is considered and mitigated when selecting muesli or other similar type foods.

Monitoring

  • A veterinarian must be consulted if there is no improvement where a guinea pig has mild anorexia or reduced appetite within 12 hours of onset or the condition of the individual(s) deteriorates.

  • A veterinarian must be consulted if a guinea pig shows signs of constipation or diarrhoea.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

  • Suitable enrichment items include, but are not limited to, tunnels, paper bags filled with hay, willow sticks/balls and branches from non-toxic, untreated fruit trees (e.g. apple).

8.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

Handling

  • Guinea pigs are not to be placed on their back in positions of tonic immobility, nor must they be picked up by the scruff of their neck.

Interactions

  • Guinea pigs must be housed in single sex groups unless sold/used for breeding.

  • Guinea pigs and rabbits must not share the same accommodation.

9.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

Checking

  • Guinea pigs front teeth and nails must be checked regularly, unless inappropriate at the stage of the breeding cycle, and treated as necessary, to ensure they are not overgrown or misaligned - only a veterinarian may correct overgrown/misaligned teeth. Guinea pigs in breeding harems must be checked as appropriate based on the management system.

Part G – Ferrets

  • Do they intend to sell ferrets as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following conditions apply to the selling of ferrets

5.0 Suitable Environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • Slatted, grid or wire mesh floors must not be used in ferret accommodation.

Environmental conditions, including sizes

  • Minimum enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table G-01

  • TABLE G-01 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR FERRETS

    g01.png
  • Accommodation needs to be of sufficient size to allow all the ferrets housed to be able to lie fully outstretched in any direction, run, forage, explore or play, as well as to stand fully upright without touching the roof of the enclosure.

  • Ferrets must be provided with constant access to places to hide. As a minimum, each hiding place must be large enough to allow one ferret to rest alone.

Bedding and substrate

  • Sleeping areas need to be dry, draught-free, well ventilated and clean as well as large enough to allow all the ferrets housed to rest together fully outstretched, turn around unimpeded and move around comfortably. Appropriate bedding materials include good quality dust-free hay and/or shredded paper, or fabric items that can be laundered (although these must be monitored for chewing/damage and removed and replaced as necessary).

  • Ferrets must be provided with a suitable substrate in sufficient amounts to allow foraging and other behaviours. Suitable litter materials include dust-free wood shavings, supplemented with dust-free hay.

  • Sawdust and sand are not suitable as either nesting or litter materials.

Temperature

  • Ambient temperature should be no lower than 12°C and no higher than 26°C.

  • In very hot weather, cooling procedures must be in place, such as, but not limited to, fans to increase air movement, ice packs or air conditioning.

  • In cold temperatures, extra nesting material must be provided, unless alternative temperature control is provided e.g. heating.

Light

  • Ferrets need to experience appropriate light: dark cycles (minimum of 8 hours light and 16 hours dark; this is not to exceed 16 hours light and 8 hours dark).

Toileting

  • Ferrets require space for their toilet area removed from their sleeping or eating areas. Litter trays can be placed in this area to assist with cleaning.

Housing and competition

  • There must be at least one hiding place for each ferret housed within an enclosure and there must be two entrance/exit points to prevent monopolisation.

6.0 Suitable Diet

Diet

  • All ferrets must be fed a suitable, complete ferret diet, provided at appropriate intervals.

  • Ferrets must not be fed dog or cat food, as these contain cereal and plant proteins which ferrets are unable to digest. For the same reason, bread or cereals must also not be given to ferrets.

  • Ferrets mustn’t be given anything that contains small bones, excluding day old chicks.

Monitoring

  • A veterinarian must be consulted if there is no improvement in poor intake or anorexia within 24 hours of onset or if the condition of the individual(s) deteriorates.

Water

  • Where water is supplied in bowls they must be heavy based.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

Enrichment

  • There must be environmental enrichment in all enclosures.

  • Ferrets must not be given enrichment made of rubber, due to the risk of ingestion leading to intestinal blockages if chewed and swallowed.

Exercise

  • Ferrets need access to an area in which to exercise.

8.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

Handling

  • Ferrets must be not be lifted using only one hand.

Interactions

  • Ferrets must be housed in single-sex groups or pairs, ideally comprising of littermates or individuals introduced as juveniles.

  • Being induced ovulators, adult jills must be prevented from remaining in season to mitigate oestrogen related diseases. Veterinary advice must be sought about reproductive management. This must be documented and the reproductive issues explained to prospective purchasers.

9.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

Preventative treatment

  • The purchaser must be advised that ferrets should be vaccinated against canine distemper, usually at 6-8 weeks of age and again at 10-12 weeks old, thereafter annually but as per manufacturer’s recommendations.

Checking

  • Ferrets nails must be checked regularly to ensure they do not become overgrown.

Part H – Domestic Small Rodents

  • Domestic small rodents means hamsters, gerbils, rats, mice, chinchillas, degus.

  • Do they intend to sell domestic small rodents as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following specific conditions apply to the selling of domestic small rodents

5.0 Suitable Environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • If wire cages are used, bars must be narrow enough to avoid the risk of escape.

  • Slatted, grid or wire mesh floors are not to be used in small animal accommodation.

  • Chinchillas can be housed in cages with wire mesh floors if there are areas of alternative flooring such as solid wood.

  • Minimum enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table H-01.

  • TABLE H-01 -MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR SMALL MAMMALS (RODENTS)

    h01.png

Environmental conditions, including sizes

  • Every animal must be able to lie fully outstretched, turn around unimpeded, stand fully upright without touching the cage roof, hide, dig, run and play.

  • Sleeping areas need to be dry, draught-free, well ventilated and clean as well as large enough to allow all the small rodents housed to rest together fully outstretched, turn around unimpeded and move around comfortably.

Bedding and substrate

  • Small rodents must be provided with suitable nesting material in sufficient amounts.

  • The type used will depend on the animal kept; see list below. Small rodents must not be given nesting materials which can separate into thin strands, e.g. cotton wool. Suitable nesting materials for small rodents include, but are not limited to:

  • o Hamsters - hay, wood wool, shredded paper or cardboard.

  • o Rats and mice - hay, shredded paper, paper strips and paper tissues.

  • o Gerbils - ink-free cardboard (e.g. empty toilet rolls, egg boxes, plain cardboard boxes) or paper and hay.

  • o Chinchillas and degus must be provided with constant access to a nest box filled with hay.

  • Any hay, nesting materials and substrates provided must be good quality and dust- free.

  • Small rodents must be provided with a suitable litter and substrate in sufficient amounts. There are a number of different litters available and the type will depend on the animal kept. Suitable materials include but are not limited to:

  • o Hamsters - dust-free wood shavings or granulated corn-cob

  • o Rats and mice - non-aspen woodchips, cellulose based chips or shredded paper

  • o Gerbils - peat-free compost or rough-grained woodchip/hay mix.

  • o Chinchillas - shredded paper, dust-free wood shavings and hay.

  • o Degus - dust-free wood shavings and hay.

  • Small rodents must be provided with constant access to places to hide, in addition to their sleeping area. As a minimum each hiding place needs to be large enough to allow one individual to rest alone.

  • Small rodents must be provided with a choice of different nesting materials.

Temperature

  • Temperatures must be appropriate to species specific or life stage consideration. In general ambient temperatures must not go below 12OC or exceed 26OC. This may be provided with nesting material.

  • High temperatures above 18oC can be detrimental to chinchillas and extra checks and precautions must be made on these in very hot weather

  • Providing sufficient nesting material can help achieve these temperatures.

Handling and transport

  • Small rodents must be transported in suitable carriers and must not be mixed with unfamiliar animals (in the same carrier). They must be transported with their companion small rodent(s), where applicable, and the carrier is to be of an appropriate size so that it is not overcrowded.

6.0 Suitable Diet

Diet

  • All small rodents must be fed a suitable diet, ad libitum

  • Chinchillas and degus must have constant access to good quality dust-free hay

  • All small rodents must be fully weaned on admission.

Monitoring

  • If there is no improvement in poor intake or not eating within 12 hours or the condition of the individual deteriorates, a veterinarian must be consulted.

  • A veterinarian must be consulted if a small mammal shows signs of constipation or diarrhoea.

Water

  • Water must be provided in a bottle or automatic water systems and located away from the sleeping area to help prevent this becoming damp/waterlogged if the bottle leaks.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

Enrichment

  • Suitable enrichment items include, but are not limited to, tunnels, paper bags filled with hay, willow sticks/balls and branches from non-toxic, untreated fruit trees (e.g. apple).

  • Chinchillas and Degus must be given the opportunity to use a sand bath by offering one on a regular basis, e.g. 10 minutes daily. This should not be permanently available.

  • Small mammals must not be given enrichment made of rubber, due to the risk of ingestion leading to intestinal blockages if chewed and swallowed.

8.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

Handling

  • Small rodents must not be picked up by the scruff of their necks, ears or unsupported by the tail, nor must they be placed on their backs in positions of tonic immobility. Picking small mammals up unsupported by the tail can result in their tail breaking or the skin sloughing off (degloving). Additionally, if chinchillas are handled roughly they may shed some of their fur.

Interactions

  • All small rodents must be housed in single sex groups unless a solitary species (or sold/used for breeding).

  • Small rodents must only be housed with other rodents of the same species.

9.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

Checking

  • The front teeth and nails of every small rodent must be checked monthly, unless inappropriate at the stage of the breeding cycle, to ensure they are not overgrown or misaligned - only a veterinarian may correct overgrown/misaligned teeth. They should have a pre-mating check and then a check at weaning time.

Part I – Other Non-Domestic Species (Mammals)

  • Other Non-Domestic Species (Mammals)’ includes any other mammal that is offered for sale excluding those already listed in this document or is any mammal not normally domesticated in Great Britain.

  • Do they intend on selling other non-domestic species (mammals) as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following specific conditions apply to selling other non-domestic species (mammals) as pets

3.0 Use, Number and Type of Animal

  • Staff must have demonstrable knowledge of the species or a closely related species

  • Staff must comply with UK legislation with regard to the selling or procurement of invasive alien species.

4.0 Staffing

  • ‘Other non-domesticated species’ covers a wide range of species seen in general trade. When approaching a novel species, it must be ensured that the same welfare requirements are met as for other species.

  • Note that courses and qualifications relevant to pet vending may not cover the care of other non-domesticated species, particularly those that are less commonly traded.

  • Primary sources of information and guidance on appropriate standards of care include, where they are available, government-issued Codes of Practice, husbandry guidelines from the zoo industry, guidance notes for related Dangerous Wild Animals Act Schedule listed species or other peer reviewed, industry or competent non-governmental organisation produced guidance materials.

  • Inspectors unfamiliar with individual novel species are strongly advised to seek appropriate competent advice, for instance zoo licence inspectors, experienced private keepers or breeders or appropriately qualified individuals, including veterinarians listed on the British Veterinary Zoological Society (BVZS) website.

  • Where specialist advice is required it is recommended that copies of training and husbandry documents are retained and secondary opinions sought.

5.0 Suitable Environment

  • Where available, government-issued Codes of Practice must be adhered to.

  • Licence holders must ensure that animals are maintained to a minimum standard as outlined in zoo standards, or industry or competent non-governmental organisation recommendations. Where these do not exist, standards for similar or related species must be considered as to their appropriateness and standards extrapolated. Note: where using non-vending standards consideration must be given to the situation of the animal and whether it is in permanent accommodation

  • or transitional vending accommodation, if the latter then it must be noted that most husbandry guidelines focus on permanent accommodation which may not be appropriate in a vending premises and smaller areas could be considered, but not fencing specification. Other aspects of care likely will apply but common sense must be applied to each individual situation.

  • Where there are no similar species and no husbandry guidance notes, or similar, then the inspector must seriously question licensing the licence holder to stock and sell to the general public those species.

7.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

  • In many cases, handling is not in the animal’s best interests and in such cases mustbe kept to a minimum

Part J – Birds

  • Do they intend to sell birds as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following conditions apply to selling birds as pets

3.0 Use, Number and Type of Animal

  • Staff must have demonstrable knowledge of the species or a closely related species.

5.0 Suitable Environment

  • Care must be taken where aviaries or cages are constructed of newly galvanised mesh to prevent heavy metal poisoning, particularly in psittacines which will often chew the metal. The licence holder must be able to demonstrate the steps taken to minimise or prevent any poisoning.

Environmental conditions, including enclosure sizes

  • All immature arboreal birds, at the point of fledging and for several following weeks, require larger cage sizes in order to stimulate flight.

  • Where a bird uses a cage for sleeping, and the vast majority of the day is spent outside of the cage in a flight aviary where it is given the option to fly, then the cage must be a minimum of 1.5x the bird’s flying wingspan for each of the length, depth and height of the cage.

  • For birds that spend the majority of their time in the cage, the cage must be a minimum of 2x the bird’s flying wingspan for the length, and 1.5x flying wingspan for the depth and height of the cage. A pair of birds must have enough space to fly past each other with the depth being increased to a minimum of 2x flying wingspan.

  • In multiple occupancy cages, for every additional bird over two birds the cage dimensions must be increased by a set percentage per additional bird (either length or width or split between the two dimensions) of the individual’s flying wingspan for that species as outlined in table J-02. Larger sizes are preferred and recommended. See table J-01 for specific examples.

  • In the case where the flying wingspan is unknown a rough estimate of two-to-three times the length of the bird (bill-tip to tip of longest tail feather) can be used as a guide for flying wingspan.

  • Where non-flying birds are maintained, enclosure dimensions must reflect current best practice for the individual species using sources similar to those outlined for mammals in Schedule I, Section 3.0 and 4.2.

  • Birds that are ordinarily confined to smaller enclosures for the specific purpose of egg-laying and/or rearing of chicks (particularly chickens and pigeons) are exempted from the cage size dimensions referenced. However, the time kept in these enclosures should be minimised and should not, in any case, exceed 5 months in any one 12 month cycle. Businesses must also provide outcome based evidence to demonstrate that the welfare of the birds is being met with reference to guidance in the rest of this document, and ensure that they are complying with the legal requirements laid down in other relevant legislation.

  • Where appropriate for the species outdoor aviaries must include sufficient sheltered and non-sheltered space. Shelter must be sufficient to allow all the birds to be undercover at the same time and preferably a third of a typical aviary should be covered with wind and rain-proof materials.

  • Where a separate flight aviary is available, the licence holder must be able to demonstrate the frequency with which the birds have access to this larger aviary to the inspector. This must be a demonstrable minimum of 6 hours in a 24 hour period on a daily basis.

  • The mesh hole size must be small enough that birds housed within cannot put their head or wing through it. The mesh gauge must be stout enough that the birds cannot break or bend it.

  • As appropriate to species, birds must be given access to water for bathing and preening to encourage feather health.

  • Birds must not be exposed to toxic or cooking fumes in the areas where they are maintained as these can be toxic to the birds e.g. Teflon poisoning, as such aviaries or cages must not be located next to kitchens or bathrooms.

  • Aviaries should have a covered roof of debris netting or be of solid construction due to the presence of avian influenza in migratory waterfowl.

  • TABLE J-01 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR BIRDS

    j01.png
  • J-02 AVIAN ENCLOSURE SIZE INCREASES FOR MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY

    j02.png

Bedding and substrate

  • There must be adequate perching space for all birds at the same time. Perches must be positioned to encourage activity, preferably flight, and so that birds do not defecate on each other or into food receptacles.

  • Flooring (for ground dwelling birds) and perching must be varied and non-abrasive to prevent bumblefoot.

Light

  • Lighting levels must approximate those of daylight with regard to intensity and colour.

  • Species requiring UVB lighting must have appropriate UVB emitting lamps manufactured for use with birds. These must be replaced according to manufacturer’s recommendations, and effective provision must be monitored through the use of a UV meter. Evidence to this effect must be demonstrable to inspectors.

Temperature

  • Species whose range originates from tropical or sub-tropical zones must not be subjected to temperatures below 5oC, except where there are known exceptions. These species should be housed at temperatures between 12 and 26oC (where appropriate for the species).

Cleaning

  • Faeces and urates must be removed at least once a week, but more frequently as required. For species which are in poor health or should not be disturbed during breeding seasons, cleaning should be minimalized, provided that appropriately hygienic living conditions are maintained.

  • Flooring must be drop-through or easily cleaned, with consideration of selection of substrate type and minimal disturbance for ground dwelling birds.

Suitable Diet

Diet

  • Birds that require it must have a constant ad lib supply of food.

  • Food supplements must be provided as appropriate to the species concerned.

  • Specialist feeding practices must be taken into consideration in aviary design e.g. access for breeding aviaries or flycatcher manure piles. At times these may be in perceived conflict with expectations for hygiene and where in doubt specialist advice must be sought. Licence holders must be able to demonstrate the rationale behind any specialist feeding practices being utilised.

6.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

Enrichment

  • Enclosures must be designed, furnished and of a size which allows inhabitants to exhibit a range of natural behaviours, including flying, climbing and hiding as appropriate.

  • Psittaciformes, and other species as appropriate, must be provided with suitable toys which encourage them to play and to ‘forage’ for foods.

  • Cages and aviaries must have at least one side (one of its horizontal dimensions) clad in an opaque material, so that the occupants are not vulnerable on all sides to viewing and disturbance.

  • Birds of prey subject to restraint by tethering for part of their lives must be flown at least four times a week unless tethered under veterinary advice for medical treatment. Licence holders must not permanently tether any bird. All birds must be given the opportunity to fly or move around freely during part of the year, for example in an aviary (free lofted) for rest periods from sale, demonstrations, breeding or moulting. The recommended period is a minimum of one month in a twelve-month period but daily or overnight is preferred.

Habituation

  • Handling must be kept to a minimum at all times except where the licence holder can demonstrate that it is in the best interest of the animal e.g. for the purpose of health checking, flying birds of prey etc.

8.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

Interactions

  • Social species must be kept in social groups suitable to the species. Where this is unavoidable, special attention must be paid to specific human interaction and they must be provided with extra enrichment. A plan must be in place for all singly housed birds

  • Decisions to pair- or group-house social bird species must be made by suitably trained and competent staff.

  • Compatible species-specific sex ratios and suitable group sizes must be observed bearing in mind potential for persistent aggression.

  • Only compatible species must be kept communally.

  • In particular, consideration for management of psittacine species, known to be sociable and live in flock situations, must be shown in the housing arrangements and stocking densities.

  • All immature birds must be housed with, OR housed in close proximity to, others of their own or similar species, using adjacent cages or aviaries where they are in visual contact.

  • Where behavioural problems are likely to arise in ‘adult’ non-colonial birds, consideration must be given to managing them separately with the same species adjacent in visual contact. Examples of species that breed in a group include budgerigars and cockatiels, non-colonial breeders include African greys, Amazons and cockatoos. Once non-colonially nesting species approach breeding age, keeping two or more in a cage can be dangerous, as paired birds of breeding age can be aggressive to each other/their own mate.

Part K – Reptiles and Amphibians

  • Do they intend to sell reptiles and amphibians as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following conditions apply to selling birds as pets

  • The following conditions apply to selling reptiles and amphibians as pets

  • Abbreviations

  • SVL Snout-to-vent length (distance from nose to cloaca).

  • STL Snout-to-tail length (distance from nose to tip of tail).

  • SCL Straight-carapace-length (straight length of the curved part of the shell of a tortoise). Carapace is the curved top part of the tortoise or terrapin shell, as opposed to the flat bottom part which is the plastron.

  • PL Plastron length

3.0 Use, Number and Type of Animal

  • Staff must have demonstrable knowledge of the species or a closely related species.

5.0 Suitable Environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • Vivaria must allow for ease of cleaning and the maintenance of hygienic standards. This includes the use of impervious materials for construction.

  • Venomous animals must be kept in appropriate, secure enclosures (with suitable means of escape-proof ventilation).

  • Service areas for venomous species must be secure Service areas must be free of escape routes or places to hide, for example access into cavity walls.

  • Enclosures containing venomous species must be individually marked with warning signs identifying the species and number of animals.

  • Venomous animal enclosures must be kept locked and access available only by authorised persons.

Environmental conditions, including sizes

  • Minimum enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table K-01

  • K-01 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS

    k01.png
  • The size of the vivarium must allow a demonstrable and species-appropriate thermogradient to be maintained.

  • All vivaria must be provided with hides or species appropriate areas of shelter.

  • The vivarium must be large enough to allow the animals separate types of activity including resting, thermo-regulating, feeding, hiding and, if applicable, swimming.

  • Height and Width of the enclosure must be appropriate to the species, with arboreal species requiring more height than terrestrial species and recommendations, stipulated below, adjusted accordingly: when considering vivarium size for arboreal species the licence holder must increase the height to the sizes outlined below for length and can reduce the length of the vivarium dimensions by 1/3.

  • The following vivarium size guidelines are for a single reptile and/or amphibian, up to a maximum of four animals for group managed species, unless specifically stated. For 5-8 animals the enclosure sizes must double and for 9-12 triple, and so on.

  • Most amphibians and reptiles are not social and may, therefore, be keptindividually. Decisions to pair- or group-house amphibian or reptile species must be made by suitably trained and competent staff. Compatible species-specific sex ratios and suitable group sizes must be observed bearing in mind potential for persistent aggression.

  • Only compatible species of similar size and from similar habitat and geographical areas must be kept communally.

  • Generally mixed taxa (e.g. lizards and tortoises) enclosures are not recommended, although paludaria (vivaria with terrestrial and aquatic areas) which combine fish with small reptiles and/or amphibians of appropriate species are acceptable.

  • Frogs and Toads: Mixing of taxa (e.g. frog & toad) is not generally recommended.Cannibalistic species, such as horned frogs (Ceratophrys sp.) and African bull frogs (Pyxicephalus sp.) must be housed individually.

  • Reptiles may be housed individually or in small groups, of the same species. Species known to be cannibalistic (e.g. king snakes Lampropeltis spp., leopard lizards Gambelia spp.) and adult males in breeding condition must be housed individually.

  • Aquatic species must be able to swim (or submerge) adequately, i.e. water depth must be at least 2 times the length (snout to vent) of the animal where appropriate for the species. Water depth should be adjusted according to the specific needs of the species.

  • To prevent trauma, materials with rough surfaces (e.g. metal mesh) must be used with caution in the construction of vivaria, unless there are species specific requirements that indicate their use e.g. for species requiring high ventilation rates. Where possible, plastic or other suitable alternative materials are preferred.

  • For reptile species or life stages where evidence suggests that smaller spaces are required for feeding and/or security then the animal must be maintained in the size- appropriate vivarium (as defined below) with the addition of a number of small hides, ensuring the animal has the choice to move out into the wider vivarium at any time and enable appropriate thermoregulation whilst ensuring the reptile feels secure. Where there are documented problems with feeding individual reptiles in larger spaces they may be maintained in smaller enclosures.

Bedding and substrate

  • Substrate may include, but not be limited to: paper towel, bark chip, wood chip, terrarium humus, moss, gravel, terrarium sand, depending on the species.

  • Burrowing species must have an appropriate substrate to facilitate burrowing.

  • Measures must be taken to minimise ingestion of substrate.

  • A moisture gradient is recommended for many amphibians. In setups which are misted on a regular basis to keep humidity levels elevated, it is important that a drainage layer is provided in the enclosure to avoid the substrate from becoming waterlogged. Drainage must be considered in all setups where there is a risk of waterlogging.

Temperature

  • Licence holders must be able to demonstrate that enclosures provide an appropriate thermogradient (the temperature range from the cool end to the hot end of the vivaria) for each species.

  • Temperature must be monitored using a reliable and repeatable method, with licence holders able to demonstrate systems are in place to allow assessment of the range of temperatures an animal experiences over a 24 hour period e.g. using a maximum/minimum thermometer.

  • Temperature must be checked daily on initial set up of a vivarium and once the temperatures are stable, where thermostatically controlled heat sources are used, assessment can be reduced to once per week.

  • The target appropriate temperatures for each species must be documented in written procedures and include, at a minimum ambient day temperature range, minimum ambient night temperature, basking zone temperature (where appropriate), and UV requirements (where appropriate). Where clearly defined ambient and basking temperatures are not available for a species then comparable species, from a similar geographical habitat, can be used to define the range. For such species where there is no known care guidelines and specialist husbandry is required these species must not be sold to a member of the general public, only competent specialist keepers.

  • Any deviations from the expected temperature range must be recorded along with the action taken to ensure the appropriate temperature is provided for the animal.

  • Heating equipment must be controlled with the use of thermostats, where compatible, and the vivaria sited so as to prevent overheating.

  • Where rack systems or other vivaria are utilised in thermally stable heated rooms, temperature monitoring of one tray per level is acceptable if accompanied by spot checks demonstrating that the recorded temperatures are representative of the other rack systems in the shared space and that the temperatures are maintained at the correct ranges for the species housed within. During inspection licence holders must be able to demonstrate that this is the case.

  • Ambient and basking temperatures must be appropriate to the species concerned, with the following guidance for commonly kept species. Ambient temperature ranges below represent the thermal gradient from the cold end to the hot end of the enclosure:

  • Licence holders and staff must have access to relevant credible reference material for normal environmental parameters

  • Basking spots may be provided by convection or radiant heat sources (e.g. light bulb, or heat mat), as appropriate to the species.

  • Heat sources, both terrestrial and aquatic, must be guarded or positioned so no direct contact to the heating element is possible by animals living in the enclosure. This includes heat-emitting light sources but excludes heat mats and hot rocks or similar such heating devices.

  • Hides/shelters must be provided in different areas across the thermogradient.

Water quality

  • Aquatic and semi aquatic amphibians must have water quality measurement similar to that for fish, with species specific requirements being met.

  • Water for aquatic species of amphibians must be dechlorinated. Methods include harvested rain water, where appropriate; or using commercial dechlorinating products.

  • Containers must be thoroughly washed between each use.

  • For semi-aquatic and aquatic reptilian species (terrapins, turtles, crocodilians) and species where water features form a part of the enclosure design water must be maintained in a clean hygienic state.

  • Where appropriate terrapins must also have an adequate land basking area typically 25/75 land to water ratio.

Light

  • Species requiring UVB lighting, must have appropriate UVB emitting lamps manufactured for use with reptiles and amphibians which must be replaced according to manufacturer’s recommendations. On installation of a new lamp, a UV meter (preferably a UVI meter) must be used to ensure adequate and appropriate UVB levels are provided at the level the animal is located. Evidence of the frequency of lamp changes and assessment of UVB output on installation must be demonstrable to inspectors.

  • UV light sources must not be screened by non-UV transmitting glass, mesh or plastic such that the animals do not receive the appropriate UVB levels. Animals must have areas of shade so that they can escape from the light if desired.

Cleaning

  • Faeces and urates must be removed a minimum of once daily. An exception to this is a system involving a larger enclosure with small species that has a mature bioactive system of management.

  • There must be a programme of waste water management and treatment for all amphibians to ensure no microorganisms are accidentally released. Specifically, those selling amphibians must treat waste water to prevent the spread of chytridiomycosis (fungus) and some viral agents prior to disposal into the sewage e.g. sodium hypochlorite (>1% for 1 min). Evidence as to how this is achieved must be available to inspectors.

5.0 Suitable Diet

Diet

  • Live invertebrates must be gut loaded and/or dusted with suitable vitamin/mineral supplement used according to the manufacturer’s instructions and with regard to the specific needs of the animal.

Feeding

  • Licence holders must maintain written records of feeding for all snakes, including hatchlings, which must be made available to buyers and inspectors.

  • In situations where a specific reptile species is known to prefer to have food left in for 24 hours this practice is considered acceptable but must be reflected in the individual species’ care sheet.

Water

  • Fresh water must be available at all times, with the exception of certain desert species, which must be offered water at a frequency suitable to the species.

  • As appropriate to species, amphibians and reptiles must be given access to water in a form that allows them to submerge or bathe within.

  • Certain species, such as chameleons and some amphibians, do not often drink from standing water and must be offered water appropriately, e.g. by a dripper system or sprayer.

6.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

Enrichment

  • Enclosures must be furnished in such a fashion as to allow inhabitants to exhibit natural behaviour, e.g. climb or hide where appropriate.

  • All vivaria must be provided with hides or species appropriate areas of shelter.

Habituation

  • Handling must be kept to a minimum at all times except where the licence holder can demonstrate that it is in the best interest of the animal e.g. to habituate the animal to handling for the purpose of health-checking. Beneficial and positive contact depends on species and can include feeding and training.

7.0 Animal Handling and Interactions

Handling

  • For amphibians, water of quality similar to that used to house them, often dechlorinated, must be used for hand washing prior to handling to prevent damage to species with moist skin. Hands must be clean and wet.

8.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

  • A dedicated area for storage of cadavers must be present separate from food stores.

Part L – Fish

  • Do they intend to sell fish as part of their Animal Activity Licence

  • The following conditions apply to the selling of fish;

  • “Coldwater” refers to freshwater ornamental fish species including, but not limited to: Goldfish (all varieties), common carp (including Koi), Tench, Orfe, Rudd and sturgeon species, which are kept in unheated aquaria/vats/ponds;

  • “Tropical freshwater” refers to all those freshwater ornamental fish species which require to be kept in heated aquaria;

  • “Tropical Marine” refers to all those ornamental fish species which require to be kept in sea water and heated aquaria;

  • “Temperate” refers to those species that are suitable for unheated aquaria kept in centrally heated rooms only;

  • “Centralised systems” refers to multiple aquaria or vats which are connected via pipework to a central sump tank and filter. Water is circulated through the system such that no water travels directly from one aquaria/vat to another but always via a biological filter and (possibly) other devices such as UV, ozone etc. Water quality in such systems is wholly dependent on the management of the whole system.

  • “Standalone system” refers to aquaria or vats which do not share water with others. Filtration (and heating) is provided individually to each aquarium/vat. Water quality in such systems is wholly dependent on the management of each individual aquarium/vat;

3.0 Use, Number and Type of Animal

  • There are in excess of 4000 species of fish in trade whose welfare needs can be met based on a broad categorisation. It is acceptable for fish to be categorised in broad groupings of (i) cold water, (ii) tropical marine and (iii) tropical freshwater.

  • The maintenance of water quality standards is used to determine working stocking densities.

  • The water quality standards must not be met at the expense of a correct feeding regime.

  • Exceptions to these standards might occur e.g. when aquatic organisms are diseased, after transport or other stress. However, in these cases appropriate remedial actions e.g. treatment, acclimatisation or isolation must being undertaken.

  • It is not considered necessary nor feasible to individually identify all fish held within an establishment.

5.0 Suitable Environment

Risk of injury, illness and escape to be prevented

  • Fish must be able to move freely and turn around in aquariums or ponds.

  • Some facilities will be handling very high numbers of animals on a daily basis and at such facilities some standing water may be expected. It must not be excessive and should be removed as soon as practicable. Where there is some standing water all facilities must take precautions to prevent and control the spread of disease and infection.

Temperature

  • Aquatic organisms must not be exposed to excessive heat or light, or a lack of adequate warmth. Sudden fluctuations in temperature, and water quality parameters must be avoided.

  • Temperature must be maintained within the optimal range for the fish species housed and kept as stable as possible (see Table L-01 for temperature ranges). Changes in temperature must take place gradually.

  • For centralised systems, the water temperature must be appropriate to meet the husbandry requirements and temperature range for that fish category i.e. coldwater, tropical freshwater, tropical marine, and will usually be set at the mid-range between different species within a category.

  • Water temperature for temperate fish must never fall below 17oC. Temperate fish are defined as those sold as being suitable for unheated aquariums, kept in centrally heated rooms only. Consideration must be given to the few fish species to which this is considered to be suitable and purchasers must be advised accordingly as to appropriate conditions to meet the welfare needs of the fish. In the case of doubt, licence holders must adopt a cautious attitude (i.e. unless the species is a recognised coldwater species, it must be kept in a heated aquaria i.e. in an aquarium with a thermostatically controlled heater).

  • Temperatures must be monitored daily and checked weekly with any deviations from the expected range being recorded. At high temperatures it may be necessary to provide supplementary aeration or oxygenation of enclosure water

Water quality

  • Minimum water standards must comply with those outlined in table L-02

  • TABLE L-02 -WATER QUALITY MINIMUM WATER STANDARDS

    l02.png
  • Water quality must be checked weekly and records kept of all tests. Water testing must take place in stocked tanks.

  • Centralised systems must be tested weekly. 10% of individually filtered tanks or vats must be tested weekly. On aquaria or vats in which visual inspection indicates unusual behaviour or deaths, and any necessary remedial action must be undertaken and recorded.

  • Ammonia and nitrite are toxic to fish and their accumulation must be avoided.

  • Fish must not be subject to sudden fluctuation in chemical composition of their water, other than for the controlled treatment of disease or as part of a controlled breeding programme. In case of doubt expert advice must be sought.

Light

  • Fish must be maintained on an appropriate photoperiod (i.e. day/night cycle) as far as possible.

  • For fish kept in outdoor ponds, vats and stock tanks shade from direct sunlight must be provided, for example, by the provision of plants or other shade

Cleaning

  • All aquaria/vats/ponds must be kept free of accumulations of suspended waste products or uneaten feed. Excess accumulation may affect water quality and therefore damage fish health. Waste material must be removed as necessary. Cleaning regimes must be sensitive to species-specific needs e.g. certain fish species may benefit from controlled algal build-up to facilitate grazing behaviour. Care must be taken to minimise stress during cleaning.

Accessibility to staff

  • Racked systems must be accessible by use of a stepladder or other such means.

Feed

  • Food must be added direct to the tank or pond.

5.0 Suitable Diet

Diet

  • Fish must be fed a diet suitable for that species at an appropriate feeding rate and frequency and so as to avoid competition e.g. feeding across the whole surface of the aquaria/pond, extending feeding times.

  • Licence holders selling to the general public must have an understanding of the nutritional requirements of the categories of fish they sell, and must advise the owner of these requirements.

Feeding

  • Given the numbers of fish that might be held in any one facility it is not feasible to monitor and record changes in eating habits of individual fish. The feeding behaviour of groups of fish must be recorded if such behaviour changes significantly and appropriate advice obtained from a competent specialist when appropriate.

6.0 Monitoring of behaviour and training of animals

  • Any items that get in the way of the safe and easy capture of fish must not be used or must be removed from tanks prior to capture.

7.0 Animal handling and interactions

  • Handling must be kept to a minimum at all times.

8.0 Protection from Pain, Suffering, Injury and Disease

  • Staff must take precautions to prevent cross-contamination between aquaria/vats.

  • Equipment, for example nets, must normally be cleaned and disinfected between uses or dedicated to a specific tank.

  • Aquaria/vats must be checked daily and cleaned as often as is necessary (as determined by water quality) to maintain good hygiene standards, consistent with the rate of stock turnover and consequent stocking densities.

  • For fish, in-line UV treatment or other sterilising devices effectively provide a means of isolating individual tanks in multiple tank systems and are a suitable alternative to self-contained isolation facilities. They must be of a proper size and maintained in accordance with manufacturers’ recommendations.

  • Newly introduced stocks must be given an appropriate acclimatisation period, as deemed necessary, as far as possible separate from existing stocks. New stocks must be closely monitored and any disease problem which arises must be treated promptly.

  • Fish waste, including cadavers, may be incinerated or disposed of through general waste in sealed double-bagged plastic bags.

  • Fish showing signs of illness or disease may be kept with other animals provided that all the fish in the same tank (or in connected systems, without a sterilisation filter are given appropriate treatment. In cases of doubt about appropriate treatments, expert advice must be sought (e.g. from a veterinarian, competent person, fish specialist).

  • Anyone responsible for euthanising fish must follow recommended practices, written procedures and have been suitably trained.

  • In the case of fish, it is sufficient to check daily and maintain records limited to observed signs of ill health and disease.

  • Where problems are identified remedial action must be taken.

  • In cold weather ice may form on outdoor displays such as ponds. In such cases it is important that a hole in the ice is made e.g. by floating a plastic ball which can be removed if the water freezes.

Guidance for inspectors on businesses consolidating imports of fish

  • “Consolidators” refers to businesses which import live ornamental fish for the sole purpose of supplying imports directly to wholesalers/retailers. Routinely opening boxes compromises the welfare of the fish.

  • Do they consolidate imports of fish

  • Then the following applies to businesses consolidating imports of fish.

  • Aquaculture Production Businesses (APBs) that are authorised under regulation 5(1) of the Aquatic Animal Health (England and Wales) Regulations 2009( ), and that are inspected by the Fish Health Inspectorate are exempt from the requirement to have a licence. In the case of APBs, if local authorities consider they need specialist advice, they may consult the Fish Health Inspectorate who are experienced in the inspection of these businesses.

Relevant conditions for businesses consolidating imports of fish

  • This section outlines the conditions that can be checked on inspection and the additional conditions that must be applied to such businesses.

General conditions:

  • 1.0 (licence display)

  • 2.1 (type of animals to be specified)

  • 3.3 (written training policy) - at least one designated member of staff to be on site with an understanding of import regulations, CITES, IATA standards and Welfare of Animals in Transport Regulations (WIT).

  • 4.10 (animals not left unattended) - Fish boxes must be handed over into the care of a person competent to provide necessary care from that point. They must not be dropped off and left unattended.

Pet sales conditions:

  • 2.1 (Register of animals) – purchase records maintained (see retailer).

  • 2.5 (Advertisements) – as retailer.

  • Fish must be transported in accordance with IATA and WIT regulations. The licence holder must be able to demonstrate that they have undertaken appropriate due diligence in this regard. In particular that:

  • Fish will be packed and transported according to IATA standards.

  • Distributers will meet legal obligations under WIT.

  • Anyone transporting fish has the appropriate, i.e. WIT Type 1/Type 2 authorisation

  • They keep records of all imported / transported fish that enables traceability to source. This condition can be met by retaining invoices and receipts. Additional record keeping is not required.

  • They allow access by the relevant authority to these records.

  • Have a contingency plan in place that is available to inspecting authorities and includes:o Provision for the care of fish in the event of an accident.o Provision for the care of fish in the event of failure to deliver, e.g. delayed delivery.o Emergency contact telephone numbers.

Higher Standards

  • A number of higher standards have been agreed. Meeting the higher standards is optional but is the only way to gain a higher star rating. The higher standards are classified in to two types: required (blue) and optional (red) and are outlined in the activity guidance document. To qualify as meeting the higher standards, the business needs to achieve all of the required higher standards as well as a minimum of 50% of the optional higher standards.

REQUIRED HIGHER STANDARDS (BLUE)

General

  • Businesses selling animals exclusively to other businesses must meet the cage sizes and stocking densities as stipulated in the species-specific minimum standards.

  • A documented health checklist should be completed daily and must cover physical, psychological and behavioural issues and any abnormality recorded.

  • There must be a member of permanent, full-time staff with an OFQUAL regulated

  • The following required higher standards are applicable;

Dogs

  • There must be adequate staffing to undertake more regular/frequent checks than required by the minimum standard.

  • The floor area must be at least 1.5 times larger than the minimum required.

  • Dogs must be provided with a design and layout that provides them with choice.

  • Separate areas for different activities should be provided. This can be achieved by, for example, inclusion of raised platforms.

  • There must be a travel plan that sets out how animals are managed for long journeys over 4 hours.

  • Adult dogs must have a feeding plan which sets out feeding twice a day.

  • Each dog must, every day, be fed some of their food through scatter feeding or other feeding device. If this is not done, the reason must be documented e.g. due to veterinary advice.

  • The floor area must be at least 1.5 times larger than the minimum required.

  • The last interaction session must take place within 1 hour before the end of the working day.

Cats

  • There must be adequate staffing to undertake more frequent checks than required by the minimum standard.

  • Each adult dog must have a documented daily exercise regime including lead exercise and free running.

  • Cats must be provided with a design and layout that provides them with choice.

  • Separate areas for different activities should be provided. This can be achieved by, for example, inclusion of a choice of raised platforms or hiding places.

  • For cats a privacy area where they are not visible to people or cats in neighbouring pens must be provided for toileting.

  • Cats must have a feeding plan which splits meals into small portions throughout the day.

  • Where the individual cat will benefit, they must every day be given some food through scatter feeding or other appropriate feeding device. Cats must still get the majority of their daily food allowance in a feeding dish. If this is not done the reason must be documented e.g. due to veterinary advice.

  • A written programme must be available setting out a variety of enrichment both inside and outside, including training, grooming, socialisation and play.

  • The last interaction session must take place within 1.5 hours of the end of the working day.

Rabbits

  • Where rabbits are housed in hutches, they should have permanent attached access to a secure pen.

  • Enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table E-02.

  • TABLE E-02 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR SMALL RABBITS - HIGHER STANDARDS

    e2.png
  • Litter trays must be provided that are impermeable, easy to clean and disinfect or be disposable. Where used litter trays must be deep cleaned at least weekly.

  • Containers must open from the top to facilitate removal of the animal. Containers must be lined with newspaper or bedding to absorb urine.

  • Hay must be provided in a hay receptacle or feeder at an appropriate height, which keeps it off the floor and reduces the risk of contamination of the hay.

  • Foraged foods (that have been foraged in uncontaminated areas and correctly identified) must be fed to the rabbits. Commercially available dried forages including willow can also be used to supplement the diet and provide a low risk alternative to foraged foods.

  • Dietary enrichment must be used. For example, nuggets can be scattered around the enclosure, fed in puzzle feeders or hidden in paper bags/cardboard tubes. Where puzzle feeders/dispensers are used, rabbits must be monitored to ensure they can access the food.

Guinea pigs

  • Where guinea pigs are housed in hutches, they must have permanent attached access to a secure pen.

  • Minimum enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table F-02.

  • TABLE F-02 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR GUINEA PIGS - HIGHER STANDARDS

    f2.png
  • Carriers must open from the top to facilitate removal of the animal. Carriers must be lined with newspaper or bedding to absorb urine.

  • Forage foods (that have been collected in uncontaminated areas and correctly identified) must be fed to the guinea pigs. Commercially available dried forages including willow can also be used to supplement the diet and provide a low risk alternative to foraged foods.

  • Dietary enrichment must be used. For example, nuggets can be scattered around the enclosure, fed in puzzle feeders or hidden in paper bags/cardboard tubes. Where puzzle feeders/dispensers are used, guinea pigs must be monitored to ensure they can access the food.

  • Where guinea pigs have to be housed singly they must be provided with extra sources of enrichment. A plan must be in place for singly housed guinea pigs.

Ferrets

  • Carriers must open from the top to facilitate removal of the animal; cardboard carriers are not advised as they are easily chewed and can become damp/insecure. Carriers can be lined with newspaper and some bedding material, e.g. good quality dust-free hay and/or shredded paper can be provided for comfort.

  • Dietary enrichment must be used. For example, nuggets can be scattered around the enclosure, fed in puzzle feeders or hidden in paper bags/cardboard tubes. Where puzzle feeders/dispensers are used, ferrets must be monitored to ensure they can access the food.

  • Where ferrets have to be housed singly they must be provided with extra sources of enrichment. A plan must be in place for all singly housed ferrets.

Domestic small rodents

  • Enclosure sizes must be adhered to as described in table H-02.

  • TABLE H-02 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR S,ALL MAMMALS (RODENTS) - HIGHER STANDARDS

    h02.png
  • Light-reducing shelters for rats, mice and hamsters (such as, but not limited to, a box or red tinted acrylic) must be provided. However, these must be monitored daily for signs of chewing and removed/replaced as necessary.

  • Small rodents must be provided with a choice of different nesting materials.

  • After cleaning, some used unsoiled litter and nesting material must be transferred back to help keep scents familiar for them.

  • Where social species of small rodents have to be housed singly they must be provided with extra sources of enrichment. A plan must be in place for singly housed small rodents (only those of a social species).

Birds

  • Cages/aviary sizes must meet, or exceed, higher requirements set out in the Schedule E Section 4.2 below. The enclosure size must allow the bird to have variety and choice in its environment.

  • Birds must be displayed for sale in aviaries that are 4 times the bird’s flying wingspan or larger in size for length, depth and height.for an individual bird and

  • 20% increase for each successive bird for multiple occupancy.

  • A variety of substrates, including a variety of perches for arboreal birds must be provided. Perches of a variable thickness and materials must be provided.

  • Output of UVB bulbs must be monitored with a UV meter and recorded. Species specific requirements must be documented and available for inspection.

  • Specialist nutritional advice must be sought where appropriate.

  • Birds must not be housed or sold with their wings clipped. Wings are kept entire and flight actively encouraged.

  • All birds of prey, or other trained birds where appropriate, must have daily periods of flight; either in aviaries or flown outdoors by a competent person.

  • Birds must not be removed from their parents (for ‘hand rearing’) until their eyes have been opened for more than one week to avoid risk of mal imprinting on humans as adult birds.

  • Adult non-colonial birds must be managed in large flights, to allow birds space to escape from each other if required to prevent behavioural problems. Sufficient staff to manage the population must be provided as needed.

Reptiles and Amphibians

  • For thermostatically stable vivaria temperature assessment must be increased to 3 times weekly to document maximum and minimum temperatures.

  • Where applicable a minimum of two hides or sheltered areas must be provided, located in different areas of the thermogradient.

  • Output of UVB lamps must be monitored with a UV meter and recorded on a weekly basis. Species specific requirements must be documented and available for inspection.

  • Specific written protocols for the quarantine and/or prevention of release of chytridiomycosis and potentially other biological agents must be available for inspection where amphibians are maintained.

  • A dedicated area of isolation or quarantine must be available with associated protocols and policies in place to ensure biosecurity of the premises.

Fish

  • Water quality must be assessed 3 times weekly and documented.

  • There must be evidence that UV systems are maintained regularly.

  • The business must have in place reasonable measures to prevent the import, outbreak and spread of disease/pathogens. This must be demonstrated by implementation of a biosecurity plan.

Businesses consolidating imports of fish

  • Businesses must have documented procedures that control and manage the purchase and sale of fish, internal controls in place to detect irregular transactions and a well maintained accounting system with a full audit trail.

OPTIONAL HIGHER STANDARDS (RED)

  • Level 3 qualification that is appropriate to the species kept.

  • The following optional higher standards are applicable;

Dogs

  • Ventilation must be a managed, fixed or portable air system to ensure appropriate temperatures are maintained in all weather. This can be an air conditioning unit or use of removable fans.

  • There must be a routine monthly visit to check health and welfare by the veterinary practice and the veterinary record held.

  • A person that is competent in providing for the welfare of the animals must be on the premises at all times.

Cats

  • Ventilation must be a managed, fixed or portable air system to ensure appropriate temperatures are maintained in all weather. This can be an air conditioning unit or use of removable fans.

  • A noise management plan must be in place e.g. physical barriers, cat unit design, location of noise producing equipment, with demonstration of effectiveness.

  • There must be a routine monthly visit to check health and welfare by the veterinary practice and the veterinary record kept.

  • A person that is competent in providing for the welfare of the animals must be on the premises at all times.

Rabbits

  • For open top cages rabbits that are physically able to use platforms must be provided with access to a platform or multiple platforms. For closed top cages, rabbits must be able to access these easily and be able to sit on them fully without touching the cage roof.

  • Rabbits must be provided with access to growing grass to graze on, which can be in planted grass trays. Alternatively, rabbits can be provided with two different types of hay.

  • Water must be provided for rabbits in multiple bottles or bowls. During hot weather, both a bottle and a bowl must be provided (unless kittens are present, in which case only bottles are suitable).

Guinea pigs

  • Guinea pigs must be provided with access to growing grass to graze on. This can be achieved by placing planted grass trays in their exercise areas. There must be enough grass for all guinea pigs housed to graze simultaneously. Alternatively, guinea pigs can be provided with fresh vegetables high in vitamin C every day.

Domestic small rodents

  • Small rodents that are physically able to use platforms must be provided with access to a platform (singly housed) or multiple platforms. Animals must be able to access these easily and be able to sit (ideally stand) up on it fully without touching the cage roof.

  • When work is occurring near, or nocturnal animals are checked at night, dim red light or dim white light must be used to minimise disturbance. Light level must be sufficient enough for observation/to undertake required tasks.

Other Non-Domestic Species (Mammals)

  • A written programme must be available setting out a variety of appropriate enrichment provided.

Birds

  • All cages must have direct access to a flight aviary.

  • Furniture must be changed on a regular basis to provide novelty and enclosures designed to provide choice for the animals within.

  • The licence holder must have signage identifying potentially aggressive birds including clearly labelled aviaries/cages.

Reptiles and Amphibians

  • Sizing of vivaria and associated environmental parameters must meet or exceed those outlined in the higher standards (table K-02).

  • TABLE K-02 - MINIMUM ENCLOSURE SIZES FOR REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS - HIGHER STANDARDS

    k02.png
  • For species that require brumation, designated facilities must be available and a related policy regarding temperature and other husbandry requirements available for inspection.

  • Suitable thermogradient, humidity and UVB index, where applicable, for the species must be displayed on each vivarium.

  • Large established or permanent reptilian vivaria with water features must have water filtration systems to ensure hygiene is maintained.

  • Moist, non-powdered nitrile gloves, or similar, must be used to handle amphibians.

Fish

  • A suitable temperature range for the fish must be displayed on each tank

  • For premises with no natural light there must be automated systems and/or procedures to ensure gradual change in light levels.

HIGHER STANDARDS ASSESSMENT

  • Have they met all required higher standards (blue) and 50% of the optional higher standards (red)

Risk Rating

  • This licence application and visit is regarding


  • As the application is for a new business activity then you will automatically be classed as 'high risk', this is because we have no previous history and your business activities are not fully operational.

  • If you are an existing licence holder then your activities have been risk rating by the Licensing Officer and used to determine both your star rating and length of licence to be issued. Further information is available in the DEFRA guidance 'Procedural guidance notes for local authorities' which is available on our website below;

  • 'Procedural guidance notes for local authorities'
    http://www.charnwood.gov.uk/animalwelfare

  • The following risk ratings apply;

  • Compliance History - Inspections

  • Documented evidence from formal inspections over the previous three years reveal consistent and high levels of compliance in terms of welfare standards and risk management.

  • Formal inspection over the previous three years reveal some degree of non-compliance that has required the intervention of the inspector for the business to ultimately recognise and address these.
    More serious breaches would attract other enforcement action: suspension, revocation, prosecution.

  • Compliance History – follow up action

  • No evidence of follow-up action by local authority in the last year apart from providing the licence holder with a copy of the inspection report, or sending them a letter identifying some minor, administrative areas for improvement (e.g. minor record keeping issues).

  • Follow up action by the local authority, such as sending them letters, triggered by low level non-compliance that is not addressed, or the business does not recognise the significance of the need to address the non-compliance.

  • Compliance History – re-inspection

  • No re-inspection necessary (apart from standard unannounced inspection) before next planned licence inspection / renewal

  • Re-inspection necessary to ensure compliance.

  • Complaint History – complaints to the LA

  • No complaints received direct to the LA that are justified in relation to welfare standards or procedural issues during the previous three years.

  • Low level substantiated complaints identifying concerns over the business / licence holder have been received within the previous three years.

  • Complaint History – complaints to the business

  • Licence holder records and documents any feedback received directly, in order to demonstrate compliance and willingness to address issues, and can provide evidence of this.

  • Licence holder does not record feedback received directly or show willingness to address any issues identified.

  • Appreciation of welfare standards - enrichment

  • Sound understanding by the licence holder of relevant environmental enrichment applicable to the activity (guided by expert advice), with demonstrated implementation.

  • Little environmental enrichment present, inconsistently used and its importance not understood or really valued.

  • Appreciation of hazards / risks

  • Licence holder clearly understands their role and responsibilities under the legislation. Hazards to both staff and animals clearly understood, properly controlled and reviewed with supporting evidence where applicable.

  • Licence holder not fully engaged with their role/responsibilities, lacks time to fulfil role, no system for review and reassessment of hazards to both animals and staff.

  • Appreciation of hazards / risks - maintenance

  • A suitably planned maintenance, repair and replacement program for infrastructure and equipment is in place.

  • No planned maintenance program. Building, installations and equipment allowed to deteriorate before action is implemented.

  • Appreciation of hazards / risks – knowledge and experience

  • Staff have specialist and appropriate knowledge of the taxa / species that are kept. There is sufficient staff, time and resource for daily, adequate routine monitoring, evidenced through records and staff rotas.

  • Key staff lack experience / knowledge of the species. Staff appear overburdened and / or unsupported by management, corners being cut.

  • Appreciation of hazards / risks – dealing with issues

  • Clear defined roles / responsibilities of staff, with clear processes for reporting and addressing any identified issues.

  • Lack of any process, or ownership and responsibility within the business to identify and deal with issues.

  • Welfare management procedures – written procedures