Audit

WEEKLY ACCIDENT REVIEW

The week of September 30, 2013 Southland Industries reported one new injury. The injury happened in the Northern California Division.
The only injury of the week happened at the SC-1 Project in Santa Clara, California. A pipefitter apprentice suffered back pain while lifting a box of washers. He initially declined medical attention, but after continuing discomfort, elected to see a doctor. The doctor diagnosed a back strain and kept him off work until his next visit. This is a recordable, lost time injury. Please remember to lift materials and equipment by a mechanical means, when possible. If you must physically lift something, use proper lifting technique, squat to lift and get help when needed. Do not lift anything over 50 lbs. without help!!

Weekly Topic

LIFT IT TWICE!!

Most of you have heard the general rules of safe lifting. Remember to “Get a firm grip on the load, keep it close, bend at the knees, use your legs to lift the load, and keep your spine in the natural position (with an arch in your lower back).” These principles always apply and should be incorporated into every lift--if possible!
Given the enormous number of “risky” lifting situations that you are faced with at your place of work, you may not be able to apply these principles every time. This is why you must always remember to LIFT IT TWICE! What?!
The act of lifting is the same as any other movement that you can learn to do better with practice. As you know, the more you practice a skill the better you become at doing it. But preparing to master a skill normally involves mental as well as physical training. Consider bowling, golf, skiing or sharp-shooting. You think carefully about the movements you’re going to make before you do them. This is the only way to get them right--at least until they become second nature. Similarly, lifting TWICE means applying the principal of planning your movements prior to performing the lift:

1. Your first lift is a mental lift. Think about the lift prior to actually doing it:
2. How am I going to lift the item? Can I do it myself or should I get some help?
3. How heavy is the item? Do I need to use mechanical assistance?
4. Where am I taking the item being lifted? Is the area clear where I need to set it down?
5. Is it a difficult path or a distance to go?
6. What hazards may hamper the lift or obstruct the travel path?
7. Eliminate those hazards before you lift the item. In other words, Plan the Lift First!
8. The second lift is the actual physical lift. Here is where you carry out your plan.
9. Use proper body mechanics and techniques while going through the motions. Bend those knees!
10. Most important: Keep the load as close to your body as possible and don’t twist.
Next time someone tells you to lift twice remember...

OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVEMENT

Opportunities for improvement are ALWAYS welcome! Use the Opportunity for Improvement template on iAuditor to submit.

JOBSITE SAFETY CHECKLIST
Select date

Job Name:

Job Number:

Checked By:

Signature:
1. RECORDKEEPING

a. Notices, Posters (5-in1, OSHA Notice, Payroll)

b. Emergency Contacts

c. OSHA 300 Log

2. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

a. In use: Safety glasses, Hard hats, Work boots, Gloves

b. Face shields or goggles used for overhead work

c. Respirators available

d. Welding screens

3. FIRST AID KITS

a. Available in gang box and job site trailer

b. Stocked adequately with gloves, bandages, and antiseptics

c. CPR and First Aid trained personnel

d. Medical facility location and contact information communicated

4. SCAFFOLDS

a. Competent person certified

b. Scaffold grade planking

c. Fall protection

d. Clear of debris / trash

5. LADDERS

a. Free from defects with safety feet, blocked, cleated, or otherwise secured.

b. Straight ladders at 1:4 pitch

6. CYLINDERS

a. Capped, stored in an upright position

b. Oxygen / Acetylene properly separated

c. Empty gas cylinders marked

7. TOOLS / EQUIPMENT

a. Inspected to ensure safe operating condition

b. Hand tools free from defects

c. Unsafe / Unusable tools / equipment tagged "Do Not Use"

d. Tools / Equipment properly guarded

8. HOUSEKEEPING

a. Maintained

b. Aisles and exit ways clear with 24" clearance

c. Work areas uncluttered and debris removed

9. ELECTRICAL

a. Electrical equipment grounded

b. Tools double insulated

c. Cords in good condition

d. Electrical panels covered if energized

10. FALL PROTECTION

a. Guard rails, mid rails, toe boards

b. Fall restraint systems

c. Open sides floors or platforms equipped with standard railing

d. Openings (interior / perimeter) properly barricaded or covered

11. FIRE PREVENTION

a. Flammable and explosive materials stored safely

b. Adequate number of fire extinguishers available with tags and clips

c. Vehicles and mobile equipment provided with extinguishers

12. EXCAVATIONS

a. Over 4 ft shored, benched, or sloped as required

b. Steps or ladders at 25 ft intervals

c. Competent person on site

13. HAZARD COMMUNICATION

a. MSDS and Labels available

b. Employees briefed on HAZCOM

c. HAZCOM information poster posted

d. Employees familiar with MSDS books and their location

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Please note that this checklist is a hypothetical example and provides basic information only. It is not intended to take the place of, among other things, workplace, health and safety advice; medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment; or other applicable laws. You should also seek your own professional advice to determine if the use of such checklist is permissible in your workplace or jurisdiction.